Scrapbookpages Blog

July 4, 2017

3 American presidents died on the 4th of July

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — furtherglory @ 9:10 am

July 3, 2017

Das Panzerlied [German song]

Filed under: Germany, Music, Uncategorized, World War II — Tags: , — furtherglory @ 12:46 pm

I love the rendition above because it has both English and German subtitles and uses footage from a number of American movies, including the classic 1965 Battle of the Bulge and Saving Private Ryan.

A few days back, I had a “Name That Tune” contest with another version of this song. I am announcing the winner of the last Name that Tune contest!  It is Hermie!  He is one of the best commenters on my blog.

Here is the winning comment in the Name that Tune contest:

https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2017/06/30/name-that-tune/#comment-81103

Ursula Haverbeck

Filed under: Auschwitz, Germany, Holocaust, Language, True Crime, World War II — Tags: , — furtherglory @ 7:54 am

The above Video is about Ursula Haverbeck.  Much of it is in German with English subtitles.

[Her name is also spelled as Ursala.]

The video is around 10 minutes in length; it is a little bit too long, so  I have made a link to 2 minutes and 13 seconds into the video, where Ursula actually starts speaking German with English subtitles.

Visit her German Language web site: http://ursula-haverbeck.info/

This blog post was inspired by a comment to my article “Old Ladies Don’t Blog or do they?” 

I have written two previous blog posts about Ursula Haverbeck getting into trouble with the law:

https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2015/11/13/87-year-old-ursula-haverbeck-convicted-of-holocaust-denial-in-germany/

https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2015/06/09/holocaust-denier-ursala-haverbeck-in-trouble-again-in-germany/

July 2, 2017

Should the President be impeached?

Filed under: Trump, Uncategorized — Tags: — furtherglory @ 2:26 pm

You can read a news article here about whether the President should be impeached: http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-impeachment-march-20170702-story.html

The following quote is from the news article:

Begin quote

Thousands of protesters marched down 5th Street and Broadway in downtown Los Angeles on Sunday, chanting, “Down, down, down with Trump — up, up, up with the people” as they urged Congress to impeach the president.

John Meranda, 56 of Long Beach, held a sign showing Trump’s face on the body of a chubby baby, with the word “impeach” spelled out in wooden blocks.

“Every day when I wake up, something is more terrible than it was yesterday,” Meranda said. He has attended all five of the recent anti-Trump marches and plans to keep coming, he said.

He said he’s been most recently frightened by the Republican proposal to cut billions of dollars from the Medicaid program. Meranda is insured privately, he said, “but I have friends who are kept alive by it.”

Further down Broadway, Allen Levenson, 55 of Redondo Beach, and two of his friends clutched a plastic frame supporting a 15-foot-long banner reading, “Illegitimate Corrupt Puppet.”

“It cuts to the heart of his personal insecurities and fears,” said Levinson. “And we wanted something G-rated.”

Levinson has cancer and is undergoing chemotherapy, but chose to attend the march Sunday because showing his displeasure with Trump — “who aspires to be a despot” — and the Republican Congress “is that important,” he said.

The march is one of dozens planned across the country, with demonstrations in California scheduled in Fresno, Orange County, Ventura, San Diego and San Francisco.

The Los Angeles event began about noon at Pershing Square and will end at Fletcher-Bowron Square at Main and Temple streets.

End quote from news article

 

Old ladies don’t blog — or do they?

Filed under: Language, Uncategorized — furtherglory @ 1:50 pm

There used to be a commercial for “Visiting Angels” which showed an attractive old woman sitting in front of a computer while a young girl, who was a “Visiting Angel” sat beside her, helping her with her computer.

At one point, in the commercial, the old lady said something about her “blog.”  After a few days, the word “blog” was cut out of the commercial — probably because many people called in to complain that old women do not blog.

I am an old woman of 84 and I have been blogging for many years. So old women do have blogs. Be careful about what you say because some old woman might blog about it.

Displaced Persons [DPs] then and now

Filed under: Dachau, Germany, Uncategorized, World War II — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 11:03 am

As I have mentioned many times, I spent 20 months living in Germany after World War II. My husband was an Army officer. The Army wives lived on the Army base and rarely interacted with the German people.

My husband wanted to “live on the economy” meaning that he wanted to live in a German house, not on the Army base. He wanted to meet the German people and interact with them, so he had rented the upstairs rooms in a German house before I arrived.

As soon as I arrived in Germany, I was taken to the German house, that my husband had rented, and left there all alone while my husband continued doing soldier stuff. Of course, I started crying immediately. My German land lord immediately bounded up the steps and brought me some wine. He spoke to me very soothingly, but I couldn’t understand a word that he said.

Minutes later, two scruffy looking DPs came up the stairs and knocked on my door. They asked me if they could have the cigarette butts from my ash tray. I assumed that they were going to smoke these cigarette butts, and I didn’t want them to do that, so I handed each of them a carton of cigarettes, and they left.

When my landlord saw them leaving with the cigarette cartons, he came running up the stairs, screaming at me not to give these people anything — because they were DPs.  I said “What’s a DP?”

That was my introduction to the aftermath of war and the people who were displaced by war.

I recently posted a video about displaced persons, which you can see by following the link below:

https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2017/07/01/video-germany-45-the-other-story-part-1-east-prussia/

I also wrote about the DPs, in the context of the Dachau camp, on my website at

https://www.scrapbookpages.com/DachauScrapbook/KZDachau/DachauLife01E.htm

The photo below shows a display in the Dachau museum.

Display about the refugee camp at Dachau

The photo above shows information in the Dachau Museum about the Dachau refugee camp which housed ethnic Germans who had been expelled from the Sudetenland in what is now the Czech Republic, after World War II ended. Many of the “expellees” from the Sudetenland settled in Bavaria where Dachau is located. One of the streets near the former Dachau camp is named Sudetenland Strasse.

Unless visitors spend a lot of time in the Museum at the Dachau Memorial Site, they will probably leave without learning that Dachau was a refugee camp for Volksdeutsche (ethnic Germans) longer than it was a concentration camp. Even then, visitors are likely to be confused about who the refugees were.

Some guides at Dachau tell visitors that the refugees were people from the Soviet Union or Russia who were fleeing Communism, although they were actually Germans who were the victims of ethnic cleansing after German land in East Prussia, eastern Pomerania, eastern Brandenburg and Silesia was given to Poland, and the Sudetenland in the former Czechoslovakia was given to the newly formed Czech Republic.

A total of 9,575,000 ethnic Germans were expelled from the eastern territories of Germany and 3,477,000 were expelled from Czechoslovakia in 1945 and 1946. An additional 1,371,000 ethnic Germans were expelled from Poland. Altogether, a total of 17,658,000 Volksdeutsche were expelled from their homelands and forced to flee to Germany, which was about the size of the state of Wisconsin after World War II. (Source: A Terrible Revenge by Alfred-Maurice de Zayas)

This building was a restaurant for the refugees at Dachau. It was torn down years ago.

The photograph above shows an old building that was used for disinfecting the clothing at Dachau. Before it was torn down, this building was used as a restaurant when the Dachau camp was a refugee camp for Germans who had been expelled from the Sudetenland in what is now the Czech Republic after the war. It was torn down in 1965 to make room for a Memorial Site. The location of the building is where the Jewish Memorial building now stands.

In her book entitled “The High Cost of Vengence,” Freda Utley wrote the following in a Chapter entitled “Our Crimes Against Humanity”:

The Poles, who were given possession of the territory “east of the Oder-Neisse line,” drove out the inhabitants with the utmost brutality, throwing women and children, the aged and the sick, out of their homes with only a few hours’ notice, and not sparing even those in hospitals and orphanages.

The Czechs, no less brutal, drove the Germans over the mountains on foot, and at the frontier stole such belongings as they had been able to carry. Having an eye for profit as well as revenge, the Czechs held thousands of German men as slave laborers while driving out their wives and children.

Many of the old, the young, and the sick died of hunger or cold or exposure on the long march into what remained of Germany, or perished of hunger and thirst and disease in the crowded cattle cars in which some of the refugees were transported. Those who survived the journey were thrust upon the slender resources of starving occupied Germany. No one of German race was allowed any help by the United Nations. The displaced-persons camps were closed to them and first the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration (UNRRA) and then the International Refugee Organization (IRO) was forbidden to succor them. The new untouchables were thrown into Germany to die, or survive as paupers in the miserable accommodations which the bombed-out cities of Germany could provide for those even more wretched than their original inhabitants.

How many people were killed or died will never be known. Out of a total of twelve to thirteen million people who had committed the crime of belonging to the German race, four or five million are unaccounted for. But no one knows how many are dead and how many are slave laborers. Only one thing is certain : Hitler’s barbaric liquidation of the Jews has been outmatched by the liquidation of Germans by the “democratic, peace-loving” powers of the United Nations.

As the Welsh minister, Dr. Elfan Rees, head of the refugee division of the World Council of Churches, said in a sermon delivered at Geneva University on March 13, 1949 : “More people have been rendered homeless by an Allied peace than by a Nazi war.”

The estimate of the number of German expellees, or flüchtlinge as the Germans call them, in Rump Germany is now eight or nine million. The International Refugee Organization (IRO) takes no account of them, and was expressly forbidden by act of Congress to give them any aid. It is obviously impossible for densely over-crowded Western Germany to provide for them. A few have been absorbed into industry or are working on German farms, but for the most part they are living in subhuman conditions without hope of acquiring homes or jobs.

The photos below show reconstructed barracks buildings at the former Dachau camp.

Two reconstructed barracks at Dachau

Door into reconstructed barracks at Dachau

 

July 1, 2017

Brundibar

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust, Music, Uncategorized — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 5:10 pm

Here is a short one minute clip from a rendition of Brundibar.

You can read a news article I blogged about earlier today about the concentration camp in the town of Terezin at: http://www.cjnews.com/culture/entertainment/arts/opera-returns-death-camp

This is the headline of the news article:

The Opera returns to the death camp

Begin quote from the news article:

For John Freund, this performance of an opera he loves promises to be bittersweet.

The 87-year-old Holocaust survivor, who now lives in Toronto, hopes to be well enough to travel this month to Theresienstadt – a concentration camp and ghetto in the Czech town of Terezin, near Prague, where he was once interned. There, he will see a performance of the renowned children’s opera, Brundibar, which he witnessed as a teenaged inmate of the Nazi-era camp.

Freund served as a consultant to the Canadian Children’s Opera Company, which, on July 2, began a 10-day tour of Brundibar. The company of 48 children and youth are to perform the work in Prague, where it premiered at an orphanage in 1942, as well as Krakow and Budapest. The tour ends in Terezin, where the opera was performed more than 50 times by the child inmates of the camp.

End quote from news article

============================================

The Red Cross inspection of the Terezin concentration camp lasted for six hours but the cultural events went on for a week. During the week of the inspection, there were numerous performances of the children’s opera called “Brundibar” in the new cultural hall in the Sokol building.

A jazz band, called the “Ghetto Swingers”, played in the music pavilion in the square. This was a real concession by the Nazis since they had banned jazz or swing music in all of Germany. Hitler regarded swing music and jazz as “degenerate” because two of the leading musicians, Benny Goodman and Artie Shaw, were Jewish.

The Nazi concentration camps typically had an orchestra which played classical music as the prisoners marched to work, or to the gas chambers. The Germans loved classical music and Germany was world famous for the cultural contributions of Beethoven, Bach and Brahms. One could say that the Nazis literally put down their violins in order to kill the Jews.

 

 

Brundibar, the opera, will play again at a former Nazi “death camp”

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust, Uncategorized — Tags: , , , — furtherglory @ 3:03 pm

My photo of entrance into Theresienstadt

You can read all about the alleged Nazi death camp, known as Theresienstadt, in this recent news article: http://www.cjnews.com/culture/entertainment/arts/opera-returns-death-camp

Title of the article: The Opera returns to the death camp

WEb-Brundibar-640x589.gif

Quote from the news article:

For John Freund, [a former prisoner at Theresienstadt] this performance of an opera he loves promises to be bittersweet.

The 87-year-old Holocaust survivor, who now lives in Toronto, hopes to be well enough to travel this month to Theresienstadt – a concentration camp and ghetto in the Czech town of Terezin, near Prague, where he was once interned. There, he will see a performance of the renowned children’s opera, Brundibar, which he witnessed as a teenaged inmate of the Nazi-era camp.

Freund served as a consultant to the Canadian Children’s Opera Company, which, on July 2, began a 10-day tour of Brundibar. The company of 48 children and youth are to perform the work in Prague, where it premiered at an orphanage in 1942, as well as Krakow and Budapest. The tour ends in Terezin, [rhymes with gasoline] where the opera was performed more than 50 times by the child inmates of the camp.

End quote from news article

I have a section on my website about Theresienstadt at:

http://www.scrapbookpages.com/CzechRepublic/Theresienstadt/TheresienstadtGhetto/History/index.html

The following quote is from my website:

The Red Cross inspection of the Theresienstadt camp lasted for six hours but the cultural events at Theresienstadt went on for a week. During the week of the inspection, there were numerous performances of the children’s opera called Brundibar in the new cultural hall in the Sokol building.

A jazz band, called the Ghetto Swingers, played in the music pavilion in the square. This was a real concession by the Nazis since they had banned jazz or swing music in Germany. Hitler regarded swing as “degenerate” music because two of the leading musicians, Benny Goodman and Artie Shaw, were Jewish.

The Nazi concentration camps typically had an orchestra which played classical music as the prisoners marched to work or to the gas chambers. The Germans loved classical music and Germany was world famous for the cultural contributions of Beethoven, Bach and Brahms. One could say that the Nazis literally put down their violins in order to kill the Jews.

End quote from my website

 

East Prussia – The last Winter

Filed under: Germany, Music, World War II — furtherglory @ 10:23 am

I like the German background music in this video.  It is only 4 minutes long; have a listen.

Published on Jul 19, 2013

The First East Prussian Offensive took place from 16–27 October 1944, and was carried out by the 3rd Belorussian Front under General I.D. Chernyakhovsky as part of the Memel Offensive of the 1st Baltic Front. The Soviet forces took heavy casualties while penetrating 30–60 km (19–37 miles) into East Prussia and Poland, and the offensive was postponed until greater reserves could be gathered.
The 2nd East Prussian Offensive lasted from 13 January to 25 April 1945, though some German units did not surrender until 9 May. The Battle of Königsberg was a major part of the offensive, which ended in victory for the Red Army.

  • Music

    • “Peer Gynt Suite: No.1, Op. 46: II. Aase`s Death” by Münchner Symphoniker

Video: Germany 45 the other story – Part 1 – East Prussia

Filed under: Germany, World War II — furtherglory @ 7:09 am

An excellent video about the mistreatment of Germans in East Prussia. It is in German with English subtitles.  This video is only 5 minutes long.  Have a look!

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