Scrapbookpages Blog

January 26, 2017

The story of Anne Frank is back in the news….

Filed under: Holocaust, Uncategorized — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 7:30 am

Who doesn’t love Anne Frank? — the Jewish girl who hid from the Nazis for years, living in an attic in Amsterdam.

Anne Frank

Anne Frank at the age of 13

I have visited the Anne Frank house in Amsterdam, and I have written extensively about Anne on these two pages of my website:

https://www.scrapbookpages.com/AnneFrank/AnneFrank02.html

https://www.scrapbookpages.com/AnneFrank/AnneFrank01.html

Front door of the Anne Frank house

My photo of the front door of the Anne Frank house in Amsterdam

You can read the latest news about Anne Frank at http://bangordailynews.com/2017/01/25/religion/holocaust-remembrance-day-to-feature-talk-on-americanization-of-anne-frank/

The following quote is from the news story:

Begin quote

BANGOR, Maine — Nearly every American first learns of the Holocaust by reading the “Diary of Anne Frank,” first published in 1952. While an unedited version of the diary was published in the 1990s, the sanitized version of her diary influenced how the Holocaust has been viewed by Americans for decades.

Anthony Wexler, a faculty fellow in religious studies at Colby College, will discuss how the diary contributed what scholars have call the Americanization of the Holocaust at 7 p.m. Friday at Congregation Beth El, 183 French Street, Bangor. It is sponsored by local synagogues and Jewish Community Endowment Associates and is being present on Yom HaShoah, Holocaust Remembrance Day.

“Because of the way the diary was edited by her father, Otto Frank, Anne was made into a kind of All-American girl,” Wexler said in a telephone interview Wednesday. “The Holocaust was a very acceptable event [in the first version of the diary published]. It didn’t feature the aspects of the Holocaust that were most terrifying.”

Other Holocaust scholars have criticized how the historical event has been portrayed in the U.S., including how the Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C. is designed.

End quote

You can read a description of the Anne Frank house on my website at https://www.scrapbookpages.com/AnneFrank/AnneFrank03.html

In order to see the attic, where Anne was hiding, you must climb some very steep stairs. Don’t worry about falling down these stairs — there are plenty of people on the stairs behind you, ready to catch you if you fall.

The people who work there won’t tell you this, but there is an elevator that you can use — but only if you are a prominent Jew, or if you are in a wheelchair — and a Jew.

 

 

September 5, 2015

The Dutch Jews who returned to the Netherlands after the Holocaust

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust — Tags: , — furtherglory @ 9:26 am
The Anne Frank house is on the left side of the house with red shutters

The Anne Frank house is on the right side of the house with red shutters (click on the photo for a larger size)  Photo: Peter Horree/Alamy

The photo above is shown in a news article about the Dutch Jews in the Holocaust. The photo below is my photo of the Anne Frank House.  You can read all about Anne Frank on this page of my website:  http://www.scrapbookpages.com/AnneFrank/AnneFrank01.html

My photo of the Anne Frank house

My photo of the Anne Frank house

This quote is from the news article which you can read in full here:

Amsterdam will refund relatives of hundreds of Jews who were fined for being late with their rent during their incarceration in World War II concentration camps, city officials said Friday.

“From today, the descendants of the families can ask to be reimbursed for the fines imposed for late rental payments during World War II, which were unfairly collected,” the Dutch city said in a statement.

The issue came to light in April 2013 when a student published archive documents in which Jews who had escaped from the concentration camps were billed for arrears on properties belonging to the city of Amsterdam.

The city even imposed fines for late rents on houses which had been confiscated by the Nazis and occupied by Germans or members of the Dutch National Socialist Movement, the NSB.

Some of the homes had even been destroyed in the German bombing campaign.

I am confused.  I thought that the Dutch Jews were killed in the Holocaust. But it seems that some of them escaped from the concentration camps, and they have descendants, who are alive and well and want money from the Germans.

I blogged about the Dutch Jews on this blog post:

https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2015/08/21/the-story-of-the-dutch-jews-get-curiouser-and-curiouser/

Follow the links on the blog post cited above to learn more about the Dutch Jews.

June 18, 2014

The Fault in Our Stars movie has scenes showing the Anne Frank house in Amsterdam

Filed under: Holocaust, movies — Tags: , — furtherglory @ 11:04 am

I saw the movie entitled The Fault in Our Stars yesterday.  The movie is fictional, and is based on a 2012 best-selling novel by John Green.

Hazel and Gus, the two main characters in the movie

Hazel and Gus, the two main characters in the movie

The title of the movie comes from a line in Shakespeare’s play Julius Caesar, in which the nobleman Cassius says to Brutus:

“The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars,  but in ourselves, that we are underlings.”

In my humble opinion, the movie gets off to a slow start, but improves as it goes along. I thought that the first scenes should have been more dramatic, to get our attention.

I perked up when it was announced in the movie that the two main characters were going to take a trip to Amsterdam. The most famous thing to see in Amsterdam is the Anne Frank house, so naturally I was anxious to see if the movie would include a visit to the house, which is now part of a  Museum.

The Anne Frank house in Amsterdam

The Anne Frank house in Amsterdam

The early scenes in Amsterdam show the area close to the Anne Frank house, but not the house. At first, I thought that the movie was not going to show the house, since it has nothing to do with the plot of the movie. There were scenes showing the canal boats which pass the house, and the church that is near the Anne Frank house is also shown in the background of some scenes.

A canal boat passing the Anne Frank house in Amsterdam

A canal boat passing the Anne Frank house in Amsterdam

I was standing in front of the Anne Frank house, when I took the photo above. Passengers can get off the boat and enter the house, which is now a Museum.

Church that is very near the Anne Frank House

Church that is very near the Anne Frank House

Just when I had given up, and had decided that the Anne Frank house would not be shown in the movie, the two main characters in the movie decide to visit the house.

The entrance into the Anne Frank house is from another house that is next door; visitors must stand in a long line before they can get in. The house next door is shown in the photo below.

House that is next door to the Anne Frank house

House that is next door to the Anne Frank house

Entrance into the Anne Frank Museum is through a modern building at 267 Prinsengracht, which is shown in the photo below.

Entrance into the Anne Frank Museum

Entrance into the Anne Frank Museum

The front door into the Anne Frank house is not open

The front door into the Anne Frank house is not open

Just after Hazel and Gus enter the Anne Frank house, Hazel asks an attendant if she can take the elevator. She is told that there is no elevator, which is a bald-faced lie.  I was also told that there was no elevator when I asked.

The steps up to the attic, where Anne Frank hid, are shown in the movie. These steps are so steep that they should really be called a ladder. Hazel has to drag her oxygen tank with her up the steps.

There are no scenes of the rooms where Anne and her family hid.  Would it have killed them to show the rooms?

The reason that the rooms are not shown is because the Anne Frank house is a money machine.  The Museum rakes in billions (maybe trillions) of dollars by charging admission.  No photos are allowed to be taken, because the Museum wants to sell photos of the rooms. No photos of the rooms can be put on the Internet because the Museum folks will demand that they be taken  down. Don’t even try it.

But to get back to the elevator. The exit from the Museum is through a building next door which has a modern elevator.  Important people are taken up to the attic by this elevator and they enter the Museum through what is the exit for the lowly tourists.

I felt that the movie was disingenuous in telling poor Hazel that she had to climb the steep stairs, dragging her oxygen tank behind her.

The Museum personnel should have come clean and said, “Yes, there is an elevator, but it is only for important people, not for you, Honey. We don’t care if you die while climbing the stairs; you are not good enough to use the elevator.”