Scrapbookpages Blog

December 1, 2014

Did Hitler just want to expel the Jews from Europe, or did he want to kill them all?

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust — Tags: , , , — furtherglory @ 9:11 am

I have been having a depressing discussion with one of the readers of my blog, in the comments section, about the use of the word “expelled” to describe Hitler’s motive in wanting to get the Jews out of Germany, and eventually out of Europe.

Some of the regular followers of my blog might want to weigh in on the subject of the Nazis “expelling” the Jews versus “murdering the Jews.”

Hitler wanted to “ausrotten” the Jews.  What does that mean?  There are two sides to this question.  One side is against the law in 20 countries, and the other side is “the Holocaust” as taught in schools world wide.  You can read some quotes from Hitler’s speeches on this blog post: https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2013/04/14/the-latest-flap-in-the-national-news-the-nazi-essay-controversy-in-albany-ny/

I previously blogged about this subject in a blog post entitled Let me tell you about the Jewish settlement in Nisko, Poland which you can read in full here.

This quote is from that previous blog post:

When did Hitler decide on the genocide of the Jews in Europe?  Nobody knows because he didn’t put it in writing.  One thing we do know is that, in the 1930s, there were proposals, by other European leaders, to resettle the Jews in Uganda, Madagascar or Biro Bidjan in Siberia.  In other words, any place besides Palestine.

After the conquest of Poland in 1939, Germany got in on it, with a settlement for the Jews in Nisko, a little town in Poland.   The settlement quickly failed because of poor prior planning.

Before World War II, the Polish Nationalists had asked the French right-wing parties to back the idea of a mass emigration of the Polish Jews for a settlement on the island of Madagascar. At the same time, in the Soviet Union, Stalin had launched the project of the Jewish Republic of Biro Bidjan, located in Siberia.

Let’s start with the Jewish settlement in Nizko, Poland.

This quote is from an essay written by Wolf Murmelstein, the son of Benjamin Murmelstein, the last Jewish elder of Theresienstat, now known as Terezin.

The very moment to show the Arab friends how Nazi Germany could address Jewish emigration to a destination far away from Palestine came in October 1939 after Poland had been overrun. On October 6th, Hitler, in his speech before the Reichstag, offering in this manner peace talks to the Western Allies, spoke about the new assessment of Poland and mentioned vaguely the idea of a Jewish Settlement Area there.

In the same days of October, a transport of Jewish men of working age from Vienna and Bohemia-Moravia had to be set up, and some leading Community Officials – Murmelstein from Vienna and Edelstein from Prague – with other staff members – had to join. On October 19, 1939, this first transport reached the station of Nisko, a little town in the Lublin area, near the border between the German and the Soviet zones of Poland. After a long march, the group reached a meadow, their destination. The following day, Eichmann gave a speech about building shanties, setting up a health service, an organization to start, etc. as “otherwise it should mean to die.”

In a personal talk, Murmelstein asked about the means available, realizing that there was nothing, as Eichmann advised only: “kick the Polish peasant out and settle in his house.” This seemed to be madness, but a Jewish official, within this mess and ignoring, of course, the political background, could not appreciate the method there was in it.

[…]

Eichmann, at Nisko, sent the leading Jewish officials home in order to catch every possible further emigration opportunity. From Vienna, Prague and Berlin, some

The very moment to show the Arab friends how Nazi Germany could address Jewish emigration to a destination far away from Palestine came in October 1939 after Poland had been overrun. On October 6th, Hitler, in his speech before the Reichstag, offering in this manner peace talks to the Western Allies, spoke about the new assessment of Poland and mentioned vaguely the idea of a Jewish Settlement Area there.

In the same days of October, a transport of Jewish men of working age from Vienna and Bohemia-Moravia had to be set up, and some leading Community Officials – Murmelstein from Vienna and Edelstein from Prague – with other staff members – had to join. On October 19, 1939, this first transport reached the station of Nisko, a little town in the Lublin area, near the border between the German and the Soviet zones of Poland. After a long march, the group reached a meadow, their destination. The following day, Eichmann gave a speech about building shanties, setting up a health service, an organization to start, etc. as “otherwise it should mean to die.”

In a personal talk, Murmelstein asked about the means available, realizing that there was nothing, as Eichmann advised only: “kick the Polish peasant out and settle in his house.” This seemed to be madness, but a Jewish official, within this mess and ignoring, of course, the political background, could not appreciate the method there was in it.

[…]

Eichmann, at Nisko, sent the leading Jewish officials home in order to catch every possible further emigration opportunity. From Vienna, Prague and Berlin, some thousand persons, until March 1941, could still emigrate during increasing difficulties. No further transports were scheduled to arrive in Nisko any more. The 450 workers returned home after six months. The camp had been set up for the transit of Germans returning from Eastern European countries to the Reich.

Read the last sentence again: The [Nisko] camp had been set up for the transit of [Jewish] Germans returning from Eastern countries to the [German] Reich.  It seems that no country wanted the Jews. This quote is from an article which you can read in full here:

On 13 May 1939, more than 900 Jews fled Germany aboard a luxury cruise liner, the SS St Louis. They hoped to reach Cuba and then travel to the US – but were turned away in Havana and forced to return to Europe, where more than 250 were killed by the Nazis.

Did you catch that? The Jews “fled” from the Nazis, but no other country would take them, not even the United States of America. The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum explains what happened.

I visited the USHMM museum several years ago. After leaving the elevator on the fourth floor of the musuem, the progression of the fourth floor exhibit is to the left. The displays continue around behind the elevators until you come to a red and white painted metal pole, placed horizontally so that it is a barrier blocking the exit near the end of the room. On my visit to the museum, I noticed that some visitors squeezed through and went around the barrier, but by doing so they missed a significant part of the displays.

The red and white metal pole represents the border of Poland which the Germans crossed when they invaded on September 1, 1939, but there is more to the story before you get to that point, so visitors should turn left at the barrier, where you will see a semicircular niche completely covered with a photograph of Lake Geneva.

The title of the exhibit in the niche is “No help, No haven.” It is the story of the Evian Conference, which President Roosevelt organized in July 1938. Representatives of 32 countries met at a luxury hotel to discuss the refugee problem after the Germans had taken over Austria in March and made it known that they wanted to get rid of all the Jews.

The Evian conference was a failure because no country wanted to accept the Jews, but the United States did agree to admit the full quota of Eastern Europeans and Germans (Jews and non-Jews) allowed by our immigration laws, which had not been done up to that time.

Hitler didn’t want Jews in Germany; he wanted Germany to be a nation of Germans. What to do?  Hitler decided on the Transfer Agreement, by which he sent prominent Jewish leaders to Palestine and  transferred a large sum of money with them.

I previously wrote about the Transfer Agreement on this blog post: https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2011/10/05/hitler-and-the-transfer-agreement/

Hitler was an anti-Semite, which meant something different in his day. I blogged about the meaning of anti-Semite in this previous blog post: https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2011/06/19/was-richard-wagner-an-anti-semite/

Now the news is full of stories about Netanyahu who wants Israel to be a “nation state.”  Oh no! Netanyahu is worse than Hitler, who wanted Germany to be a nation state for Germans.  Where will the Germans go, if they are ever kicked out of Germany by the Jews, who are now returning to Germany?  They can’t go to Israel because Israel is now a “nation state” for Jews.

 

 

 

 

 

April 2, 2013

What is the name for the expulsion of ethnic Germans after World War II?

Filed under: Germany — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 7:24 am

The ethnic Germans, who were expelled from Czechoslovakia and Poland, after World War II, are called “expellees” but what is the name for everything that happened to them during the expulsion.

The Jews have a name for what happened to them during World War II; their suffering is called “the Holocaust.”  The Gypsies have a name for what happened to them; their mistreatment is called “the Porajmos” or literally “devouring or destruction.”

There is an expression for denial of what happened to the Jews: it is called “the Holocaust never happened.”  But how can one express denial of the expulsion of the Germans?  For example, fill in the blank:  “the ——– never happened.”  There are laws in 17 or 18 countries now that make it a crime to say “the Holocaust never happened.”  There should also be a law against saying “the ——– never happened.”

Every detail of the ——– should be a sacred belief that cannot be denied without being imprisoned for at least 5 years.  You can read some of the details of what happened to the ethnic Germans in Czechoslovakia here.

This quote is from the website cited above:

Soviet observers even reported to the Central Committee in Moscow that the Czechs “don’t kill them, but torment them like livestock.  The Czechs look at them like cattle” (Murashko and Noskova 1995, 235-7).  Czechoslovak military officers organized mass killings of German civilians.  Vojt chern”. Karol Ctibor Pazura, and BedYich Pokorn” ordered soldiers and militias to force ethnic Germans on death marches, and even to dig their own mass graves before being shot by firing squads without being prompted by resistance (Radio Praha #2). Sudeten Germans as young as 12 and 15 who were accused of escaping from internment camps were hanged or shot.  Over 750 civilians were executed at Postoloprty after preparing their own graves (Radio Praha #1).  Many civilians and soldiers attacked or killed German civilians at random, in some cases even stringing them by their heels onto trees and dousing them with gasoline before burning them to death (A H I).

One of the worst atrocities of the expulsion was the so-called Brno March (called the Brno death march by the Germans). The large German minority around the Moravian capital of Brno was escorted out of their homes with only an hour to prepare whatever they could carry before being marched over 50 km to the border of Austria.  Over 20,000 civilian families were marched by soldiers with almost no water, food or medicine.  Many were relegated to defecate or urinate whilst they walked because they could not leave the line.  Those who dissented were disciplined with rife butts and even whips.

Bodies of the dead and inform reportedly lay on the sides of the road (BBC Jolyon). Over 800 people died due to starvation, exersion , or dehydration (Benea 2002, 209)  Other scholars cite 1,700 dead in the Czech prison camps and at Brno (Glcasheim 2000, 470).  Many German nationalists exaggerate this dead and claim as many as 20,000 but this has thus far been disproven.  Many Czechs respond to the “death march” by saying that the number dead primarily consisted of the old and inform, and was the result of the lack of food that equally affected the Czechs themselves.  Another atrocity during the expulsions was the so-called Usti Massacre in August 1945, in which Sudeten German civilians were forced to wear white armbands and were marched to a bridge by the Elbe river.  Soldiers lined several families up against the edge and hurled them over the side after they were all shot, including according to some sources an infant.  Other inter-ethnic violence against Sudeten German civilians occurred across the country.  Some first-hand sources cite unarmed Germans being shot in groups of 30 or 40 at a time before being interred in mass graves, as corroborated with the reputable BBC (Wheeler).

I was inspired to write this by a comment on my blog.  The comment is quoted below:

I need clarification – you didn’t come right out and say that the Holocaust never took place. Do you honestly believe that it’s a lie? If yes, what reason could anyone possibly ever have for telling such a story if it weren’t true? All you have to do is look into the eyes of a Holocaust survivor as they tell you what happened to them, study their body language and you’ll see they’re telling the truth. Are you a qualified psychologist who can tell me otherwise? No? Here’s some advice for you: If you want to question the integrity of a well-established part of history than make sure you state the reason why you doubt it and ensure you have evidence that contradicts it. Without evidence, your theory is without merit or logic.

If I question or dispute any detail of the Holocaust, I am accused to denying the Holocaust or “saying the Holocaust never took place.”  There is no defense to the accusation of saying “the Holocaust never took place.”  What does the expression “the Holocaust never took place” even mean?

This quote is about what happened to the ethnic Germans after World War II.  You can believe this or not; it is not required by law to believe the following:

The later stages of World War II, and the period after the end of that war, saw the forced migration of millions of German nationals (Reichsdeutsche) regardless of ethnicity, and ethnic Germans (Volksdeutsche) regardless of which citizenship, from various European states and territories, mostly into the areas which would become post-war Germany and post-war Austria. These areas of expulsion included pre-war German provinces which were transferred to Poland and the Soviet Union after the war, as well as areas which Nazi Germany had annexed or occupied in pre-war Poland, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Romania, northern Yugoslavia and other states of Central and Eastern Europe.

The movement of Germans involved a total of at least 12 million people, with some sources putting the figure at 14 million, and was the largest movement or transfer of any population in modern European history. The largest numbers came from the former eastern territories of Germany acquired by Poland and the Soviet Union (about 7 million) and from Czechoslovakia (about 3 million). It was also the largest among all the post-war expulsions in Central and Eastern Europe, which displaced more than twenty million people in total. The events have been variously described as population transfer, ethnic cleansing or genocide.

The death toll attributable to the flight and expulsions is disputed, with estimates ranging from 500,000 to 2 million; more recent estimates are close to the lower 500,000 figure.

The policy was part of the geopolitical and ethnic reconfiguration of postwar Europe; in part spoils of war, in part political changes in Europe following the war and in part recompense for atrocities and ethnic cleansings that had occurred during the war.

After the Dachau camp was liberated, ethnic Germans who had been expelled from Czechoslovakia lived in the barracks for the next 17 years.  Tour guides at Dachau do not tell visitors about the suffering of the ethnic Germans which is called ——.

November 15, 2012

Germany has paid $89 billion in reparations to the Jews … and there is more to come

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust, World War II — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 9:55 am

An article in The Detroit News, which you can read in full here states that, since 1952, Germany has paid $89 billion in reparations, and the Germans are increasing their payments this year.

This quote is from the article in The Detroit News:

Germany has paid — primarily to Jewish survivors — some $89 billion in compensation overall for Nazi crimes since the agreement was signed in 1952.

In one change to the treaty that Germany agreed to earlier this year, the country will provide compensation payments to a new category of Nazi victims — some 80,000 Jews who fled ahead of the advancing German army and mobile killing squads and eventually resettled in the former Soviet Union.

So that’s how Holocaust survivors got to the Soviet Union.  At this time of the year, there will be TV ads, asking for contributions to feed the starving survivors in the former Soviet Union.

This quote is also from the article in The Detroit News:

Germany already increased payments this year for home care for Holocaust survivors by 15 percent over 2011, and has pledged to raise that further in 2013 and 2014.

Compensation has been ever evolving since the 1952 agreement, with annual negotiations between the Claims Conference and the German government on who should receive funds and how much will be paid.

Still, even 67 years after the end of World War II, there is much to set right, said Stuart Eizenstat, the former U.S. ambassador to the European Union [an American citizen] who serves as the Claims Conference’s special negotiator.

“One of the things that drives me is that with all of that, the best surveys out there are there are probably 500,000 survivors alive today worldwide and half of them are in poverty or very close to the poverty line,” he told the AP. “This is an ongoing responsibility — this is not the end of the road.”

Half of the Holocaust survivors are close to the poverty line?  What?  They didn’t get a book deal for their sad story?

Note that Germany first started paying the Jews in 1952 for the Holocaust.  Germany was still a pile of rubble at that time and there were millions of “expellees,” the term for ethnic Germans who had been evacuated to Germany after the war.  What about them?  Did they ever get any reparations?

The expellees from the Czech Republic were still living in the barracks at Dachau in 1960 before they were thrown out, so that a Memorial could be constructed at Dachau.

How long will Germany have to pay reparations for the Holocaust?  Probably until there are no more ethnic Germans left in Germany, which will be in the year 2050, according to Germar Rudolf.

November 10, 2011

“the Holocaust never happened” (What does this mean?)

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust — Tags: , , , — furtherglory @ 7:59 am

In a comment on this post on my blog, a reader used the expression “the Holocaust never happened.” But what does this mean?  Does anyone ever seriously say “The Holocaust never happened”?

Billboard that was put up in Berlin several years ago

Before the Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe was built in Berlin, the billboard shown in the photo above was put up at the future site of the memorial.  The message on this billboard was intended to be facetious, but some people took it literally, and the sign had to be taken down.  (The English translation is “the Holocaust never happened.”)

The expression “the Holocaust never happened” is used by Holocaust believers, followed by “of course, it happened.”  This is not an expression used by Holocaust revisionists.

There were a lot of lies told about World War I, including “The Big Lie.”  Does anyone ever say that World War I never happened?  (“The Big Lie” was the claim that Germany lost the war on the battlefield.)

After World War II, millions of ethnic Germans were expelled from Poland, Czechoslovakia and other countries and forced to go to Germany, which was a pile of rubble at that time.  Thousands of the expellees lived at the former Dachau concentration camp for 17 years before they were thrown out so that the camp could be made into a Memorial site.  This piece of history is very controversial, but does anyone ever say that it never happened?

The question is “How much of history are people required by law to believe in order to stay out of prison?”  Do we have to believe every survivor story, no matter how ridiculous it is?  Do we have to believe Elie Wiesel’s story, even though he has no tattoo from Auschwitz and no ID number from Buchenwald?