Scrapbookpages Blog

June 17, 2017

The liberation of the Mauthausen camp is in the news

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust, Uncategorized, World War II — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 12:07 pm

This photo shows prisoners who were liberated at Auschwitz, not at Mauthausen

The photo above was used to illustrate this news article: http://www.thedailybeast.com/the-holocaust-didnt-end-with-the-liberation-of-auschwitz-and-the-nazi-death-camps

The following quote is from the news article:

Begin quote

For more than 70 years, Marsha Kreuzman has believed that she would be better off dead.

Death first promised salvation during her years of physical and psychological torture at the Mauthausen concentration camp as the Second World War devastated Europe.

When the Nazi encampment was liberated in May 1945, an American soldier tried to help her to her feet. Kreuzman recalls: “He said, ‘You have to walk.’ I said, ‘I don’t want to walk, I want to die.’”

Kreuzman, who now lives in Livingston, New Jersey, is sorry that she was not more joyful when the moment of liberation arrived; she is painfully aware that so many of her friends, her compatriots, her family were unable to escape the horror of one of history’s darkest chapters.

End quote

The liberation of Mauthausen

I have a whole section on my website about the liberation of Mauthausen: http://www.scrapbookpages.com/Mauthausen/KZMauthausen/Liberation/index.html

The photograph shown above was taken on May 6, 1945, the day after the official liberation of the Mauthausen main camp. It shows prisoners surrounding an M8 Greyhound armored car.

According to Pierre Serge Choumoff, the liberation of Mauthausen, as shown in the photo above, was reenacted for photographers at the request of General Dwight D. Eisenhower. The Nazi eagle over the gate had already been removed by the prisoners and a banner, written in Spanish, had been put up by the Spanish political prisoners. The English translation reads “The Spanish Anti-Fascists Salute the Liberating Forces.”

These prisoners were Spanish Republicans who had fought against General Francisco Franco’s Fascist forces in the Spanish Civil War and had escaped to France when the Republicans lost the war.

The Spanish Republicans were interned by the French and later, when the Germans defeated France in 1940, they were incarcerated as political prisoners because they were opposed to the Nazis. Germany had fought on the side of Franco in the Spanish Civil War, which was a war between the Fascists and the Communists. For the anti-Fascist Spanish Republicans, Mauthausen has the same significance as Auschwitz does for the Jews.

On May 5, 1945, the date usually given for the official liberation of the Mauthausen main concentration camp, a platoon of 23 men from the 11th Armored Division of the US Third Army, led by Staff Sgt. Albert J. Kosiek, arrived at the main camp near the town of Mauthausen. They were guided there by Louis Haefliger, a Red Cross representative in the camp, and two German soldiers, after first liberating the Gusen sub-camp, 6 kilometers to the west.

End quote

April 30, 2017

Who remembers Eisenhower’s death camps?

Filed under: Germany, Uncategorized, World War II — Tags: , , , — furtherglory @ 7:06 am

Gotha, Germany – “Eisenhower’s Death Camp”

On March 10, 1945 as World War II was coming to an end, General Eisenhower signed an order creating the status of Disarmed Enemy Forces for the German Prisoners of War who would soon be surrendering to the Americans. This order was a violation of the Geneva Convention because it allowed Eisenhower to disregard the rules for the treatment of Prisoners of War. It allowed him to starve the German POWs, deny them the right to send and receive letters, and to receive Red Cross packages and packages from German civilians. All of these rights were enjoyed by the prisoners in the Nazi POW camps and even in the notorious concentration camps. Eisenhower signed this order before he had even seen the horrors of the concentration camps, which so affected him.

In his book entitled “Other Losses,” James Bacque wrote the following:

Begin quote

There were no tents in the Gotha DEF camp, only the usual barbed wire fences round a field soon churned to mud. On the first day, they received a small ration of food, which was then cut in half. In order to get it, they were forced to run a gauntlet. Hunched over, they ran between lines of guards who hit them with sticks as they scurried towards their food. On April 27, they were transferred to the U.S. camp at Heidesheim further west where there was no food at all for days, then very little.

End quote

The German city of Gotha is mostly known to Americans, if at all, as the first headquarters of the American Army in Germany, set up by General Dwight D. Eisenhower in April 1945, and as the site of one of the Prisoner of War camps where captured German soldiers were treated in a barbaric fashion with total disregard to the rules of civilized warfare, according to an American guard at the camp.

General Eisenhower mentioned Gotha in his book “Crusade in Europe,” as the nearest city to the “horror camp” at Ohrdruf-Nord, the first concentration camp to be discovered in Germany by American soldiers on April 4, 1945, but he failed to mention his own notorious POW camp located near Gotha.

A few years ago, I met a former German soldier who had been a prisoner in the American POW camp near Gotha in Germany.  Some of the American soldiers, who were guarding the camp, had allowed him to escape. He told me the horrible details about how German POW’s had been treated by the Americans.

After 1947, most of the records of the POW camps were destroyed by the U.S. government, according to James Bacque, the author of a book entitled “Other Losses.” Bacque wrote that the Germans claimed that 1,700,000 soldiers, who were alive at the end of the war and had surrendered to the Allies, never returned home. All of the Allied countries denied responsibility, and the families were never told what had happened to their loved ones.

The following quote by Lieutenant Ernest Fisher, of the 101st Airborne Division and former Senior Historian of the United States Army is from the book “Other Losses”:

Begin quote

Starting in April 1945, the United States Army and the French Army casually annihilated about one million men, most of them in American camps.

Eisenhower’s hatred, passed through the lens of a compliant military bureaucracy, produced the horror of death camps unequaled by anything in American military history…

End quote

Stephen Ambrose, a noted World War II historian, disputes the claims made by James Bacque. His review of Bacque’s book can be read at this web site:

http://www.nizkor.org/hweb/people/b/bacque-james/ambrose-001.html

For another opinion, go to this web site:

http://www.rense.com/general46/germ.htm

Ironically, Gotha also holds a place in history as the birthplace of the Socialist Worker’s Party of Germany in 1875. The very house, called the Haus am Tivoli, where August Bebel and others got together to form this new leftist political party, is at the intersection of Cosmartstrasse, but it is closed to tourists.

A plaque was placed outside the house by the Communist East German government, commemorating this as the place where a “glorious moment in the history of the German working class” took place.

Karl Marx wrote a scathing paper called “Critique of the Gotha Programme” in which he criticized the new party as a sell-out of the proletariat and the Communist party, which he had popularized in 1848 with his “Communist Manifesto.” In 1890, the name of the party was changed to the Social Democratic Party.

On May 7, 1945, the German army surrendered to General Eisenhower, who refused to shake hands with the German General, as is customary. The neutral country of Switzerland was removed as the Protecting Power for German prisoners, which was another violation of the Geneva Convention. General George S. Patton quickly released the prisoners who had surrendered to his Third Army, but General Eisenhower held his POWs until the end of 1946, forcing them to live on starvation rations. Red Cross packages sent to the German POW camps were returned. The POW camps had no barracks or tents.

The German prisoners were forced to dig holes in the ground for shelter, as the picture below shows. Even though the American army had plenty of tents, the prisoners lived for months in their holes. When it rained, the holes collapsed and the prisoners died.

German POWs had to dig holes for shelter, as shown in the photo above.

After 1947, most of the records of the POW camps were destroyed by the U.S. government, according to James Bacque, the author of a book entitled “Other Losses.” Bacque wrote that the Germans claimed that 1,700,000 soldiers, who were alive at the end of the war and had surrendered to the Allies, never returned home. All of the Allied countries denied responsibility, and the families were never told what had happened to their loved ones.

The following quote by Lieutenant Ernest Fisher, of the 101st Airborne Division and former Senior Historian of the United States Army is from the book “Other Losses”:

Begin quote

Starting in April 1945, the United States Army and the French Army casually annihilated about one million men, most of them in American camps.

Eisenhower’s hatred, passed through the lens of a compliant military bureaucracy, produced the horror of death camps unequaled by anything in American military history…

End quote

Stephen Ambrose, a noted World War II historian, disputes the claims made by James Bacque. His review of Bacque’s book can be read at this web site:

http://www.nizkor.org/hweb/people/b/bacque-james/ambrose-001.html

For another opinion, go to this web site:

http://www.rense.com/general46/germ.htm

Ironically, Gotha also holds a place in history as the birthplace of the Socialist Worker’s Party of Germany in 1875. The very house, called the Haus am Tivoli, where August Bebel and others got together to form this new leftist political party, is at the intersection of Cosmartstrasse, but it is closed to tourists. A plaque was placed outside the house by the Communist East German government, commemorating this as the place where a “glorious moment in the history of the German working class” took place.

Karl Marx wrote a scathing paper called “Critique of the Gotha Programme” in which he criticized the new party as a sell-out of the proletariat and the Communist party, which he had popularized in 1848 with his “Communist Manifesto.” In 1890, the name of the party was changed to the Social Democratic Party; it is still one of the largest political parties in Germany today.

It was the Social Democrats who declared a Republic in Germany on November 9, 1918, forced the Kaiser to abdicate, and then signed the Armistice which ended World War I two days later. The Nazis referred to the Social Democrats as the “November Criminals” and called their actions “der Dolchstoss” (Stab in the Back). The claim that Germany had lost World War I on the battlefield was called “The Big Lie” by Hitler in his book, “Mein Kampf.” The harsh Treaty of Versailles, signed by the Social Democrats in June 1919, insured that another war would soon follow.

April 26, 2017

Eisenhower’s Remagen death camp for German soldiers

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 2:51 pm

I have just learned that some of my readers, who are well informed about the Holocaust, do not know about how General Eisenhower treated the German soldiers who had surrendered to the Americans.

400px-reemagen_enclosure.jpeg

The photo above shows an American soldier guarding German soldiers in the Remagen POW camp.

I wrote about this on my scrapbookpages.com website. I am quoting it in full here:

Begin quote

Gotha, Germany – “Eisenhower’s Death Camp”

The city of Gotha is mostly known to Americans, if at all, as the first headquarters of the American Army in Germany, set up by General Dwight D. Eisenhower in April 1945, and as the site of one of the Prisoner of War camps where captured German soldiers were treated in a barbaric fashion with total disregard to the rules of civilized warfare, according to an American guard at the camp.

General Eisenhower mentioned Gotha in his book “Crusade in Europe,” as the nearest city to the “horror camp” at Ohrdruf-Nord, the first concentration camp to be discovered in Germany by American soldiers on April 4, 1945, but he failed to mention his own notorious POW camp located near Gotha.

On March 10, 1945 as World War II was coming to an end, General Eisenhower signed an order creating the status of Disarmed Enemy Forces for the German Prisoners of War who would soon be surrendering to the Americans. This order was a violation of the Geneva Convention because it allowed Eisenhower to disregard the rules for the treatment of Prisoners of War. It allowed him to starve the German POWs, deny them the right to send and receive letters, and to receive Red Cross packages and packages from German civilians. All of these rights were enjoyed by the prisoners in the Nazi POW camps and even in the notorious concentration camps. Eisenhower signed this order before he had even seen the horrors of the concentration camps, which so affected him.

In his book entitled “Other Losses,” James Bacque wrote the following:

There were no tents in the Gotha DEF camp, only the usual barbed wire fences round a field soon churned to mud. On the first day, they received a small ration of food, which was then cut in half. In order to get it, they were forced to run a gauntlet. Hunched over, they ran between lines of guards who hit them with sticks as they scurried towards their food. On April 27, they were transferred to the U.S. camp at Heidesheim further west where there was no food at all for days, then very little.

On May 7, 1945, the German army surrendered to General Eisenhower, who refused to shake hands with the German General, as is customary. The neutral country of Switzerland was removed as the Protecting Power for German prisoners, which was another violation of the Geneva Convention. General George S. Patton quickly released the prisoners who had surrendered to his Third Army, but General Eisenhower held his POWs until the end of 1946, forcing them to live on starvation rations. Red Cross packages sent to the German POW camps were returned. The POW camps had no barracks or tents.

POWcamp.jpeg

The German prisoners were forced to dig holes in the ground for shelter. Even though the American army had plenty of tents, the prisoners lived for months in their holes. When it rained, the holes collapsed and the prisoners died.

After 1947, most of the records of the POW camps were destroyed by the U.S. government, according to James Bacque, the author of a book entitled “Other Losses.” Bacque wrote that the Germans claimed that 1,700,000 soldiers, who were alive at the end of the war and had surrendered to the Allies, never returned home. All of the Allied countries denied responsibility, and the families were never told what had happened to their loved ones.

The following quote by Lieutenant Ernest Fisher, of the 101st Airborne Division and former Senior Historian of the United States Army is from the book “Other Losses”:

Starting in April 1945, the United States Army and the French Army casually annihilated about one million men, most of them in American camps.

Eisenhower’s hatred, passed through the lens of a compliant military bureaucracy, produced the horror of death camps unequaled by anything in American military history…

Stephen Ambrose, a noted World War II historian, disputes the claims made by James Bacque. His review of Bacque’s book can be read at this web site:

http://www.nizkor.org/hweb/people/b/bacque-james/ambrose-001.html

For another opinion, go to this web site:

http://www.rense.com/general46/germ.htm

Ironically, Gotha also holds a place in history as the birthplace of the Socialist Worker’s Party of Germany in 1875. The very house, called the Haus am Tivoli, where August Bebel and others got together to form this new leftist political party, is at the intersection of Cosmartstrasse, but it is closed to tourists. A plaque was placed outside the house by the Communist East German government, commemorating this as the place where a “glorious moment in the history of the German working class” took place.

Karl Marx wrote a scathing paper called “Critique of the Gotha Programme” in which he criticized the new party as a sell-out of the proletariat and the Communist party, which he had popularized in 1848 with his “Communist Manifesto.” In 1890, the name of the party was changed to the Social Democratic Party; it is still one of the largest political parties in Germany today.

It was the Social Democrats who declared a Republic in Germany on November 9, 1918, forced the Kaiser to abdicate, and then signed the Armistice which ended World War I two days later. The Nazis referred to the Social Democrats as the “November Criminals” and called their actions “der Dolchstoss” (Stab in the Back). The claim that Germany had lost World War I on the battlefield was called “The Big Lie” by Hitler in his book, “Mein Kampf.” The harsh Treaty of Versailles, signed by the Social Democrats in June 1919, insured that another war would soon follow.

End quote

When I lived in Germany for 20 months after the war, I met a young man who claimed that he had been a prisoner in Eisenhower’s death camp, but he escaped with the help of some German citizens who were camping outside Eisenower’s prison camp, and sneaking food into the camp.

That’s all she wrote, and she rubbed that out.

May 21, 2015

Bradley Smith is still making trouble at American universities

Filed under: Holocaust — Tags: , , , — furtherglory @ 8:10 am

Today, I received an e-mail alerting me to a new letter that Bradley Smith has sent to Professor Steven Pinker at Harvard University. This is nothing new. Bradley Smith has been making trouble for years, by constantly sending letters to universities, asking for the name of one person (with proof) who was gassed by the Nazis.

Remains of the gas chamber at Sachsenhausen which had a floor drain

Remains of the gas chamber at Sachsenhausen which has a floor drain

Can a homicidal gas chamber have a floor drain, like the one shown in the ruins of the Sachsenhausen gas chamber, in the photo above?  Just asking!

Although there are numerous Holocaust survivors, out on the lecture circuit, who are claiming that their relatives were “gassed,” there is no proof whatsoever that gas chambers were used to kill people during the “Holocaust.”

I have written several blog posts about the alleged gas chambers at the Majdanek “death camp,” which you can read here: https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/tag/majdanek-gas-chamber/

Dwight D. Eisenhower

Dwight D. Eisenhower

This quote is from the letter to a Harvard professor, written by Bradley Smith:

Back in 2009 The Harvard Crimson ran a one-column, two-inch ad where I asked why Dwight D. Eisenhower, in his book Crusade In Europe, did not mention the words “gas chambers.” Publication of the ad caused a scandal and The Crimson withdrew it after one run. You can review that story here. From what I can find, you did not comment on this Free Speech scandal. Reading your principled article in The Boston Globe, it occurs to me to wonder why.

Why do you think General Eisenhower wrote his account of World War 11 and choose to not mention “gas chambers”? No one was in a better position to know what weapons of mass destruction the Germans employed during that war and which they did not. Eisenhower chose (he chose!) to not support a narrative about gas chambers that he had every reason to understand was corrupt. At the same time, having in mind to further his career, he would evade risking that career by discounting them.

Why does Bradley Smith keep taunting people like this? He knows why Eisenhower did not mention the “gas chambers,” and so does everyone else of Eisenhower’s generation. [Eisenhower was born in 1890.]

Back in 1948, when Eisenhower wrote his best selling book, everyone knew what a homicidal gas chamber was.  Everyone knew that a crematorium, that was not air tight and did not have a tall stack to vent the gas, could not have been used to gas 2,000 people at one time, as the Holocaustians now claim.

Back in 1948, America had gas chambers to execute criminals, including the gas chamber in Jefferson City, MO where two people could be gassed at the same time.

I wrote about the gas chamber in Jefferson City, Missouri on this blog post: https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2012/06/03/what-does-a-real-gas-chamber-look-like/

April 4, 2015

April 4th, the anniversary of the day the first Nazi camp was liberated

Today is an important date in Holocaust history. This is the day that the Ohrdruf camp, a sub-camp of Buchenwald, was discovered by American troops.

Col. Hayden Sears poses with survivors of the Ohrdruf camp on April 8, 1945 -- four days after the camp was liberated

Col. Hayden Sears poses with survivors of the Ohrdruf camp on April 8, 1945 — four days after the camp was liberated by American troops

Ohrdruf was the only camp that General Dwight Eisenhower ever visited. Ohrdruf was little known until Obama claimed that his uncle was one of the liberators of Auschwitz; he corrected his statement later, saying that his uncle was one of the liberators of Ohrdruf.

Dead bodies found in a shed at Ohrdruf

Dead bodies found in a shed at Ohrdruf

After his visit to the Ohrdruf camp on April 12, 1945, General Eisenhower wrote the following in a cable on April 15th to General George C. Marshall, the head of the Joint Chiefs of Staff in Washington, DC. This quote is prominently displayed by the U.S. Holocaust Museum in Washington, DC:

. . .the most interesting–although horrible–sight that I encountered during the trip was a visit to a German internment camp [Ohrdruf] near Gotha. The things I saw beggar description. While I was touring the camp I encountered three men who had been inmates and by one ruse or another had made their escape. I interviewed them through an interpreter. The visual evidence and the verbal testimony of starvation, cruelty and bestiality were so overpowering as to leave me a bit sick. In one room, where they were piled up twenty or thirty naked men, killed by starvation, George Patton would not even enter. He said that he would get sick if he did so. I made the visit deliberately, in order to be in a position to give first-hand evidence of these things if ever, in the future, there develops a tendency to charge these allegations merely to “propaganda.”

Ironically, General Eisenhower’s words about “propaganda,” turned out to be prophetic. Only a few years later, Paul Rassinier, who was a French resistance fighter imprisoned at the Buchenwald main camp, wrote the first Holocaust denial book, entitled Debunking the Genocide Myth, in which he refuted the claim by the French government at the 1946 Nuremberg trial that there were gas chambers in Buchenwald.

Note that General Eisenhower referred to Ohrdruf as an “internment camp,” which was what Americans called the camps where Japanese-Americans, German-Americans and Italian-Americans were held without charges during World War II. Ohrdruf was the first, and only, “internment camp” that General Eisenhower ever saw.

I previously blogged about the discovery of Ohrdruf  at https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2011/04/04/april-4th-the-66th-anniversary-of-the-day-that-american-troops-discovered-ohrdruf/

March 15, 2014

General Patton’s policy regarding the treatment of German POWs

Filed under: World War II — Tags: , , , — furtherglory @ 10:00 am

A reader of my blog recently made a comment in which he stated that General Patton told his men: “Any man who brings me an SS prisoner will be court Marshalled!”?

I interpret this to mean that General Patton wanted his men to take no prisoners when fighting in battle against Waffen-SS soldiers. Even more explicit, General Patton ordered his men to kill all Waffen-SS soldiers who surrendered.

I have been searching for some verification of this order, but have found nothing.  What I did find in my searching was an article about General Eisenhower and his treatment of German POWs at http://www.rense.com/general46/germ.htm

This quote is from the website cited above:

One month before the end of World War 11, General Eisenhower issued special orders concerning the treatment of German Prisoners and specific in the language of those orders was this statement,

“Prison enclosures are to provide no shelter or other comforts.”

Eisenhower biographer Stephen Ambrose, who was given access to the Eisenhower personal letters, states that he proposed to exterminate the entire German General Staff, thousands of people, after the war.

Eisenhower, in his personal letters, did not merely hate the Nazi Regime, and the few who imposed its will down from the top, but that HE HATED THE GERMAN PEOPLE AS A RACE. It was his personal intent to destroy as many of them as he could, and one way was to wipe out as many prisoners of war as possible.

Of course, that was illegal under International law, so he issued an order on March 10, 1945 and verified by his initials on a cable of that date, that German Prisoners of War be predesignated as “Disarmed Enemy Forces” called in these reports as DEF. He ordered that these Germans did not fall under the Geneva Rules, and were not to be fed or given any water or medical attention. The Swiss Red Cross was not to inspect the camps, for under the DEF classification, they had no such authority or jurisdiction.

This quote from the website cited above is the most important:

Months after the war was officially over, Eisenhower’s special German DEF camps were still in operation forcing the men into confinement, but denying that they were prisoners. As soon as the war was over, General George Patton simply turned his prisoners loose to fend for themselves and find their way home as best they could. Eisenhower was furious, and issued a specific order to Patton, to turn these men over to the DEF camps. Knowing Patton as we do from history, we know that these orders were largely ignored, and it may well be that Patton’s untimely and curious death may have been a result of what he knew about these wretched Eisenhower DEF camps.  […]

General Patton’s Third Army was the only command in the European Theater to release significant numbers of Germans.

Others, such as Omar Bradley and General J.C.H. Lee, Commander of Com Z, tried, and ordered the release of prisoners within a week of the war’s end. However, a SHAEF Order, signed by Eisenhower, countermanded them on May 15th.

I wrote about Eisenhower’s DEF camps on my website at http://www.scrapbookpages.com/EasternGermany/Gotha/

November 30, 2011

The myth that General Eisenhower ordered German civilians to visit Buchenwald

The famous story of how General Dwight D. Eisenhower ordered German civilians to march five miles up the hill from Weimar to see the Buchenwald concentration camp has been told many times.  But is this story really true?  Not according to General George S. Patton, who was there that day.

German civilians were ordered to see dead bodies at Buchenwald concentration camp

The famous photo above and the photo below were taken by Life magazine photographer Margaret Bourke-White on April 15, 1945 as a procession of German civilians from the city of Weimar were forced to visit the Buchenwald concentration camp. According to The Buchenwald Report, written by the prisoners at Buchenwald, Bourke-White had just arrived that day, along with General Patton.

Weimar residents were forced to look at bodies of  dead prisoners at Buchenwald concentration camp

General George S. Patton wrote in his autobiography that he visited the Buchenwald concentration camp for the first time on April 15, 1945.  He wrote that he did not make a special trip to see the camp.  Patton had visited the Ohrdruf sub-camp of Buchenwald on April 12, 1945, along with General Omar Bradley and General Dwight D. Eisenhower. Patton threw up when he smelled the 40 dead bodies in a shed at Ohrdruf. He refused to go inside the shed, but General Eisenhower famously said (regarding his visit to Ohrdruf):

I visited every nook and cranny of the camp because I felt it my duty to be in a position from then on to testify at first hand about these things in case there ever grew up at home the belief or assumption that “the stories of Nazi brutality were just propaganda”

General Eisenhower wrote in his autobiography that he only visited one camp and that was the camp near Gotha, which would be Ohrdruf.

After General Patton’s visit to Ohrdruf, he flew to Weimar to visit what he thought was going to be his next Command Post. Patton wrote in his autobiography that his visit to the main Buchenwald camp was only a side jaunt, suggested by General Walton Walker, the man who ordered the Weimar residents to march 5 miles to the Buchenwald camp.

Was General Patton lying when he wrote that it was General Walton Walker who ordered German civilians to visit Ohrdruf and then ordered civilians in Weimar to visit the main Buchenwald camp?  Why does everyone give Eisenhower credit for ordering German civilians to visit Buchenwald?  Is it because Eisenhower made no secret of his hatred for the German people?

There are photos of Eisenhower at Ohrdruf, but no photos of him at Buchenwald because he was never there and he did not give the order for civilians to visit Buchenwald.

On April 15, 1945, the day that he visited Buchenwald, General George S. Patton wrote the following in a letter to General Dwight D. Eisenhower:

We have found at a place four miles north of WEIMAR a similar camp, only much worse. The normal population was 25,000, and they died at the rate of about a hundred a day. The burning arrangements, according to General Gay and Colonel Codman who visited it yesterday, were far superior to those they had at OHRDRUF.

I told the press to go up there and see it, and then write as much about it as they could. I also called General Bradley last night and suggested that you send selected individuals from the upper strata of the press to look at it, so that you can build another page of the necessary evidence as to the brutality of the Germans.

This letter to General Eisenhower was written by General Patton on the day that he saw Buchenwald at the suggestion of General Walker.  It was General Walton Walker who ordered the civilians of the town of Ohrdruf and the city of Weimar to see the Buchenwald camps, not Eisenhower; he had better things to do.  Yet every day you can read somewhere on the Internet that it was Eisenhower who ordered the local Germans to see the camps.

For example, this quote which you can read in full here:

He (Ben-Gurion) would on many occasions recall (as Barack Obama did in his speech at Buchenwald in 2009) how Eisenhower had forced the local Germans to visit the liberated camps and see for themselves the piles of corpses and the skeletal survivors. In his speech Obama quoted Eisenhower as saying at the time that he was concerned that humanity would forget what had been done in these places, and he was determined to never let that happen. Ben-Gurion was hugely impressed and moved by this act of Eisenhower’s, both for its humanitarian quality and for its historic significance.

December 22, 2010

What I didn’t know about the Holocaust — until now

Filed under: Holocaust — Tags: , , , — furtherglory @ 9:32 am

I thought I knew a lot about the Holocaust; I’ve been studying it for around 17 years.  It turns out that I was wrong about many of the important details.

Today I read this on a wordpress blog:

Another example Eaton gave was a photograph widely circulated by the Holocaust deniers of General Eisenhower standing next to one of the gas chambers at Dachau. “And they hold this up and say, here is Eisenhower being shown a false gas chamber. And they are correct. At Dachau, which was a camp in Germany used mainly for political prisoners, they started to construct a gas chamber. They used inmates to construct the gas chamber. The inmates sabotaged the chamber and it was never actually used as a gas chamber.”    (more…)

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