Scrapbookpages Blog

March 16, 2014

Hasidim but I don’t believe ’em

Filed under: Holocaust — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 11:56 am
Hisidic Jew in Brooklyn, NY

Hisidic Jew in Brooklyn, NY

In an episode of “The Sopranos,” a popular TV series several years ago, Paulie Walnuts says “Hasidim but I don’t believe ’em.”  You can watch this famous episode on You Tube at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YauJVdK8GPI

I thought of this when I read a blog post about Hasidim on this blog: http://blogs.forward.com/sisterhood-blog/194267/when-hasidic-boys-grow-up-without-real-school/

This quote is from the blog post, cited above:

Last summer, when I interviewed Hasidic men and women who grew up with little to no secular education, I remember feeling angry at this system that churns out, intentionally, boys who cannot speak or read English — the first step in acquiring basic skills to function as an adult in the 21st century. The words one brilliant man used to refer to educational neglect in Satmar is still ringing in my ears: “This is criminal.”

Indeed, it is. Educational neglect of this magnitude should be considered criminal. No community in America should be allowed to perpetuate such inattention to the wellbeing of children.

Watching this video made me think of the countless times my husband and I explained to our children why we don’t know certain basic concepts or historical facts, why my husband never learned how to punctuate a sentence. We talk freely about our childhoods and our desire to see them, our children, receive a solid education. We explain that education is power, and that it is the single driving force for human progression. We speak of our pride in their academic achievements and demonstrate its importance by asking questions about subjects we don’t know.

The next time my son says he hates school, I will play him this video. Hopefully he will get the message.

In reading the above words on the blog of an Hasidic woman, I was reminded of what Hitler wrote in his book Mein Kampf, about the first time that he saw an Hasidic Jew on the streets of Vienna.  I don’t want to waste my time looking for this passage in Mein Kampf, so I will give you this quote from Wikipedia, which tells about what it was like when Hitler lived in Vienna:

At the time Hitler lived there, Vienna was a hotbed of religious prejudice and racism.[37] Fears of being overrun by immigrants from the East were widespread, and the populist mayor, Karl Lueger, exploited the rhetoric of virulent antisemitism for political effect. Georg Schönerer’s pan-Germanic antisemitism had a strong following in the Mariahilf district, where Hitler lived.[38] Hitler read local newspapers, such as the Deutsches Volksblatt, that fanned prejudice and played on Christian fears of being swamped by an influx of eastern Jews.[39]

Hitler’s father was a follower of Georg Schönerer who advocated German nationalism.  Now the idea, of a country having a population of people of one race and one religion, has been thoroughly discredited by the Holocaustians who preach diversity.  Diversity causes problems in many countries of the world today, but it keeps the Jews safe, and allows them to live in any country they choose.  If there is ever a threat of another Holocaust, the Jews now have their own country where they can go to escape.