Scrapbookpages Blog

June 28, 2017

The Holocaust survivor who jumped off a cliff to save himself

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust, Uncategorized — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 1:08 pm

The following quote is from a news article which you can read in full at https://www.thejc.com/culture/film/destination-unknown-mosberg-film-documentary-holocaust-1.440039

The photo above shows Holocaust survivor Ed Mosberg who is still alive

Begin quote from news article:

Later, [Ed] Mosberg found himself in a sweltering, airless cattle wagon [on a train], also bound for Auschwitz. However, when the transport arrived, it sat on the rails for a night, because “they were too busy at the crematorium [where bodies were burned]. So they never unloaded us and they took us [instead] to Mauthausen.”

End quote from news article

So what was it like in the Mauthausen prison?

My photo of the Mauthausen quarry

After working in the Mauthausen quarry, the prisoners in the “punishment detail” had to carry a heavy rock on their backs, up the steps and out of the quarry. Only the prisoners in the “punishment detail” had to do this.

My photo of the Mauthausen stairs which the prisoners had to climb to get out of the quarry

[How did I mange to take the photo above, you ask.]

I hired a taxi to take me to the bottom of the stairs, early in the morning, before the Memorial Site was open to visitors. [So I cheated! Sue me!]

Begin quote from news article:

He [Ed Mosberg] worked in the quarry, where exhausted prisoners ascended and descended [the] 186 steps, carrying rocks weighing up to 50Kg. “If somebody stopped for a moment, they’d push them to their death. Or they’d beat you. Or they’d shoot you,” says Mosberg. “Mathausen and Gusen – they were the two worst concentration camps, and they were classified that way by the Germans.”

End quote from news article

Actually, the prisoners only had to carry one heavy rock out of the quarry, at the end of the day. And that was only if they were in the punishment group.

My photo of a rock carrier used at Mauthausen

You can read about the death statistics for the Mauthausen camp on my website at http://www.scrapbookpages.com/Mauthausen/KZMauthausen/History/deathstatistics.html

You can read about the Jewish prisoners at Mauthausen on my website at http://www.scrapbookpages.com/Mauthausen/KZMauthausen/History/Jews.html

I have a section about the town of Mauthausen on my website at http://www.scrapbookpages.com/Mauthausen/Town/index.html

When I was doing research on Mauthausen, I was told by many people, all of them Jews, that I should not go to the town because there were Jews waiting there to kill people and take everything that the visitors owned.

I decided to risk it anyway, and I found that the people in the town were the most friendly people that I had ever met. I’m glad that I stayed in the town.  You can see my photos of the town at http://www.scrapbookpages.com/Mauthausen/Town/index.html

June 26, 2017

The voyage of the ship called “The St. Louis” is back in the news

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust, Uncategorized — Tags: , , , — furtherglory @ 11:16 am

The passengers on the ship called “The Saint Louis” wave “goodbye” as the ship leaves — Image copyright Getty Images

You can read about the ship called “The St. Louis” in this news article: http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-27373131

What does this have to do with the price of eggs in China, you ask. It relates to Trump’s current rules on who can enter America.

The following quote is from the news article:

Begin quote

On 13 May 1939, more than 900 Jews fled Germany aboard a luxury cruise liner, the SS St Louis. They hoped to reach Cuba and then travel to the US – but were turned away in Havana and forced to return to Europe, where more than 250 were killed by the Nazis.

“It was really something to be going on a luxury liner,” says Gisela Feldman. “We didn’t really know where we were heading, or how we would cope when we got there.”

At the age of 90, Feldman still clearly remembers the raw and mixed emotions she felt as a 15-year-old girl boarding the St Louis at Hamburg docks with her mother and younger sister.

“I was always aware of how anxious my mother looked, embarking on such a long journey, on her own with two teenage daughters,” she says.

[..]

By early 1939, the Nazis had closed most of Germany’s borders and many countries had imposed quotas limiting the number of Jewish refugees they would allow in.

Cuba was seen as a temporary transit point to get to America and officials at the Cuban embassy in Berlin were offering visas for about $200 or $300 each – $3,000 to $5,000 (£1,800 to £3,000) at today’s prices.

When six-year-old Gerald Granston was told by his father that they were leaving their small town in southern Germany to take a ship to the other side of the world, he struggled to understand what that meant.

“I’d never heard of Cuba and I couldn’t imagine what was going to happen. I remember being scared all the time,” he says, now aged 81.

For many of the young passengers and their parents however, the trepidation and anxiety soon faded as the St Louis began its two-week transatlantic voyage.

Feldman, who shared a cabin in the lower part of the ship with her sister Sonja, spent her time walking around the deck chatting with boys of her own age, or swimming in the ship’s pool.

On board, there was a dance band in the evenings and even a cinema. There were regular meals with a variety of food that the passengers rarely saw back home.

Under orders from the ship’s captain, Gustav Schroder, the waiters and crew members treated the passengers politely, in stark contrast to the open hostility Jewish families had become accustomed to under the Nazis.

The captain allowed traditional Friday night prayers to be held, during which he gave permission for the portrait of Adolf Hitler hanging in the main dining room to be taken down.

Six-year-old Sol Messinger, who was traveling with his father and mother, recalls how happy everyone seemed. In fact, he says, the youngsters were constantly being told by the adults that they were now safe from harm: “We’re going away,” he heard people say again and again on that outward journey. “We don’t have to look over our shoulders any more.”

But as the luxury liner reached the coast of Havana on 27 May, that sense of optimism disappeared to be replaced by fear, then dread.

Granston was up on deck with his father and dozens of other families, their suitcases packed and ready to disembark, when the Cuban officials, all smiles, first came aboard.

It quickly became clear that the ship was not going to dock and that no-one was being allowed off. He kept hearing the words “manana, manana” – tomorrow, tomorrow. When the Cubans left and the ship’s captain announced that people would have to wait, he could feel, even as a little boy, that something was wrong.

For the next seven days, Captain Schroder tried in vain to persuade the Cuban authorities to allow them in. In fact, the Cubans had already decided to revoke all but a handful of the visas – probably out of fear of being inundated with more refugees fleeing Europe.

The captain then steered the St Louis towards the Florida coast, but the US authorities also refused it the right to dock, despite direct appeals to President Franklin Roosevelt. Granston thinks he too was worried about the potential flood of migrants.

By early June, Captain Schroder had no option but to turn the giant liner back towards Europe. “The joy had gone out of everything,” Feldman recalls. “No-one was talking about what would happen now.”

As the ship headed back across the Atlantic, six-year-old Granston kept asking his father whether they were going back to see their grandparents. His father just shook his head in silent despair.

By then, people were openly crying as they wandered the ship – one passenger even slit his wrists and threw himself overboard out of sheer desperation. “If I close my eyes, I can still hear his shrieks and see the blood,” Granston says quietly.

In the end, the ship’s passengers did not have to go back to Nazi Germany. Instead, Belgium, France, Holland and the UK agreed to take the refugees. The American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee (JDC) posted a cash guarantee of $500,000 – or $8 million (£4.7m) in today’s money – as part of an agreement to cover any associated costs.

On 17 June, the liner docked at the Belgian port of Antwerp, more than a month after it had set sail from Hamburg. Feldman, her mother and sisters all went on to England, as did Granston and his father.

They both survived the war but between them they lost scores of relatives in the Holocaust, including Feldman’s father who never managed to get out of Poland.

Two-hundred-and-fifty-four other passengers from the St Louis were not so fortunate and were killed as the Nazis swept across Western Europe.

End quote

 

June 24, 2017

The proposal to insure the biological continuation of the German people is racist. Who knew?

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust, Uncategorized — Tags: , — furtherglory @ 2:05 pm

Here is an interesting quote from the above video:

Begin quote

The proposal to “ensure the biological continuation of the German people” will be, by the democratic parties, for whom I shall speak today, rejected with the greatest insistence, and condemned utterly.  This proposal is racist and inhuman, narrow-minded and backwards, and shows once again, the terrifying ideology of the Nationalist party and its spiritual similarity to Nazi-ideology.

End quote

I recommend that people watch this short video.  It contains some good examples of Hitler’s speaking style with subtitles, and some good classical background video.  Please take 6 minutes to watch.

I am glad that I got to see Germany while it was still Germany.

 

June 6, 2017

It is time to play name that boat!

Filed under: Germany, Uncategorized, World War II — Tags: — furtherglory @ 1:09 pm

Image result for higgins boat

Contest rules:

Like “always” if you think this contest is too easy; you can become a winner by giving a helpful hint.  The more obscure the hint, the more points you get.

I will start:

Hint: This boat had a forward draft of 2 feet, 2 inches.

 

D-Day landings began on this day: June 6, 1944

Filed under: movies, TV shows, World War II — Tags: , — furtherglory @ 8:03 am

Footage dramatizing before dawn fighting, sunrise, and the first shore landings, on June 6th, 1944 as seen by paratroopers who had been dropped behind the lines into France.

May 3, 2017

May 1945 — Germans surrender

Filed under: Germany, Uncategorized, World War II — Tags: — furtherglory @ 10:26 am

Execution of 16 Year Old German Heinz Petry by the US Fire Squad 

We are lucky to have someone commenting on my blog, who served as a German solderer in World War II, and was an eye witnesses to the end of war.  My blog post today includes material from his blog which you can read in full by following the links provided.

The two links are a two part account of HK Stolpmann of those days.  The second link is from his account of his experience on May 9th 1945.  The first link is about the general mistreatment and often execution of German youth at the end of the war.  I have selected a few highlights, but those interested in learning more about those days should definitely follow these links.

http://dachaukz.blogspot.com/2011/03/my-own-surrender-to-3rd-us-army-9th-may.html

Begin quote from the above link:

It was an entirely different position the Allies took when HJ [Hitler Youth] members were captured or surrendered in their original uniform, with their swastika armband on their sleeves….

These boys had no rights under any rules to be treated as POW’s when captured and were faced with summary execution.

End quote

http://dachaukz.blogspot.co.nz/2011/03/sonndorf-pow-camp-to-dachau-kz.html

Begin quote:

The final act was  signed in Berlin together with the Russians in the morning of May the 8th.  At that time my platoon of 15 boys and one Officer, Lieutenant Becker marched towards the German border from within Czechoslovakia in the area of Schuettenhofen.  There was a sort of no-mans land and all troop movements were strictly forbidden, we did not adhere to this order. As we had thrown all our weapons down to comply to Doenitz’s command, except our Lt. who carried his MP38 to protect us to some degree against Czech partisan’s ambushes when [on May 9th 1945] we met the first American soldiers confronting a massive column of tired and dejected Germans that all were trying to avoid capture by the Russians.  I have never seen my Lieutenant ever since.

End quote.

Further down in the same blog post, Stolpmann continues:

Begin quote

At that time we did not know that Eisenhower had issued an order on March 10th 1945 and verified by his initials on a cable of that date, that German Prisoners of War be predesignated as “Disarmed Enemy Forces” or DEF.  Eisenhower  ordered that these Germans did not fall under the Geneva Convention, and were not to be fed or given water or medical attention. The Swiss Red Cross was not to inspect the camps, for under the DEF classification, they had no such authority or jurisdiction.

End Quote.

Stolpmann remembered about these days in a recent comment on this blog:

…’Unser Führer ist gefallen’ – which means ‘[Our Führer died in combat action’]

Indeed I did find a scrap of newspaper while spending the first days as a POW (DEF) in Sonndorf, which claimed that our beloved leader with the flag in one hand and a rifle in the other died fighting for the glory of our people and the Third Reich. Beside it was one of the first actual accounts of another newsprint that Hitler had committed suicide in his bunker prior to marrying Eva Brown!

I was so disgusted by what I felt was American propaganda that I tore the paper to pieces and held the other one to my chest, proud of my Führer!

So much for brainwashing.

End quote.

April 15, 2017

The Lithuanian Jews are back in the news

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust, Uncategorized — Tags: , — furtherglory @ 11:52 am

You can read about the Lithuanian Jews in this news story:

http://www.timesofisrael.com/science-helped-verify-this-unbelievable-holocaust-escape-story/

The following quote is from the news article:

Begin quote

“Holocaust Escape Tunnel,” a “Nova” production to be shown April 19, sheds new light on the attempt by 80 imprisoned men and women — mostly Lithuanian Jews — to make a break for freedom in the face of Nazi bullets. The show documents the application of scientific methods to verify what would otherwise be a nearly unbelievable story.

The documentary is set in and around Vilna, the Yiddish and Hebrew designation for Vilnius, the capital of Lithuania. At its peak, before World War II and the Holocaust, the city boasted a Jewish population of some 77,000, had 105 synagogues, the largest Jewish library in the world and six daily Jewish newspapers.

End quote

I have written about the Lithuanian Jews several times on these blog posts:

https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/tag/lithuanian-jews/

Unfortunately, many people do not believe the story of the Lithuanian Jews. I do not believe it either.

April 12, 2017

Sean Spicer apologized Tuesday after saying Adolf Hitler “didn’t even sink to using chemical weapons”

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust, Uncategorized — Tags: , — furtherglory @ 7:47 am

Listen up people!

Get the facts straight about the Holocaust and Hitler’s use of Zyklon-B gas to kill handicapped children and Jews.

You can read about the gas chamber used at Auschwitz on this page of my website: http://www.scrapbookpages.com/AuschwitzScrapbook/Tour/Auschwitz1/Auschwitz08.html

The first thing that I saw on TV this morning was a very subdued Sean Spicer apologizing for his mistakes when he talked about gassing people. It was mentioned that handicapped children were gassed, implying that these children had only a minor handicap.

You can read about the handicapped children who were killed at Hartheim on my website at http://www.scrapbookpages.com/Hartheim/exhibits01.html

You can read the latest news about Spicer at https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/apr/11/sean-spicers-hitler-holocaust-speak-volumes

My photo of the reconstructed gas input device at Hartheim Castle where handicapped children were gassed

The following quote is from the news article:

Begin quote

Under the rule of Adolf Hitler, German authorities, beginning in 1939, gassed millions of people to death. The first victims were German citizens deemed handicapped and thus “unfit for life.”

End quote

On my website, you can read about the gas chamber at Hartheim Castle, and see photos of the gas chamber where handicapped people were killed: http://www.scrapbookpages.com/Hartheim/gaschamber01a.html

The news article continues with this quote:

Begin quote

After Germans with local assistance had shot about a million Jews in Eastern Europe, gassing was added as a second technique of mass murder. Jews were killed by carbon monoxide at Chelmno, Belzec, Sobibor and Treblinka, and by hydrogen cyanide at Auschwitz.

Spicer’s comments on Tuesday must be understood in the context of how the White House chose to reflect upon Holocaust Memorial Day in January: by deliberately ignoring the Jewish victims of the Holocaust. This is the key to the whole affair: the White House cannot acknowledge the basic politics of the Holocaust.

This incredible statement by Spicer – which erases the use of deadly chemical agents by Nazi Germany – fits very well into the general historical politics of the Trump administration. The name of Hitler is invoked to criticize the enemy of the moment (today Assad, not long ago American intelligence officers).

The general consequence is to minimize the scale of Hitler’s crimes: we are instructed that intelligence agencies are acting like Nazi Germany, or we learn what Hitler supposedly did not do. And this is an administration that is not very clear on what Adolf Hitler in fact did.

End quote

April 9, 2017

Comparing Planned Parenthood abortions to the Holocaust is fair game

Filed under: Health, Holocaust, Uncategorized — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 4:16 pm

The title of my blog post today is the title of a news article in the Kiowa County Signal by Rich Kiper. You can read the article in full here: http://www.kiowacountysignal.com/opinion/20170402/rich-kiper-comparing-planned-parenthood-abortions-to-holocaust-is-fair

Kiper is defending the remarks of Senator Fitzgerald, who compared the seven million babies killed by planned parenthood to the six million Jews killed in the holocaust.

I blogged about this same article once before in a blog post entitled “I have been to Dachau” which you can read here: https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2017/04/03/i-have-been-to-dachau/  I am writing more about this article from a different angle.

The following is a quote from the Kiowa Signal news article:

Begin Quote

Since the 1973 Roe v. Wade decision legalizing abortion, Planned Parenthood has performed 6,937,406 abortions. This number is based on PP annual reports of 1978-2014 and studies conducted on PP abortions between 1973 and 1978. The numbers do not include abortions performed in 2015 and 2016. Therefore, according to its own reports, PP has exterminated more babies that the Nazis exterminated Jews during the Holocaust. Based on the numbers, Sen. Fitzgerald is correct in that PP is “more insidious than (the Nazis).”

End Quote

Was planned parenthood more insidious than the Nazis?

Begin Quote from Kiawa County Signal news article:

Sen. Fitzgerald is right to be angry with an organization that has killed more babies than the Nazis killed Jews….

He [Fitzgerald] did, though, very clearly compare PP aborting 6,937,406 unwanted babies to the Nazi killing of six million unwanted Jews. Abortion is a horrific act that involves killing an unborn child. Pro-life adherents should praise Sen. Fitzgerald for having the courage to speak truth, knowing full well that he would be subjected to attack by those for whom facts are irrelevant and the life of the unborn is not sacred.

End quote from news article

I think that Kiper is confused.  The Jews are sacred; unborn Children are not.  I am surprised that I need to explain this to you people.

If this were not the case, we would need to be building a lot more monuments to the 7 million children insidiously murdered by planned parenthood.

March 8, 2017

Reinhard Heydrich is back in the news

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust, World War II — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 1:38 pm

Reinhard Heydrich

You can read a recent news article about Reinhard Heydrich at https://sofrep.com/76321/reinhard-heydrich-hunting-devil/

The following quote is from the news article:

Begin quote

Apart from Hitler, perhaps no one typified the evil of Nazism more so than Reinhard Heydrich. Cold, calculating, arrogant and brutal, he is a figure whose hands-on approach to dealing with perceived enemies of Germany made him author of some of the worst crimes ever perpetrated by man.

Tall, slender with smooth blond hair and a somewhat high pitched voice, he joined the SS in the early 1930’s, and quickly rose through the ranks with cutthroat efficiency, running the SS intelligence service, the Sicherheitsdienst or SD. In this office, he helped orchestrate notable events which defined Hitler’s policies by purging suspected political rivals in what became known as The Night Of The Long Knives in 1934, and terrorizing Jews in the Crystal Night pogrom of 1938.

End quote

I am not a fan of Reinhard Heydrich, but he is an interesting person who has gotten a bad rap.

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