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December 23, 2016

Could Herschel Grynszpan still be alive?

Filed under: Dachau, Germany, Uncategorized, World War II — Tags: , , , — furtherglory @ 10:44 am
Herschel Grynspan

Photo on news article shows Herschel Grynszpan, then and now

On this news article, you can read about the possibility that Herschel Grynszpan is still alive: http://www.haaretz.com/world-news/europe/.premium-1.759957

In 1938, there was a night of violence in Germany, that came to be known as  Kristallnacht. This was the night that German citizens smashed windows in Jewish shops and set fire to over 200 Jewish Synagogues throughout Germany, Austria and the Sudetenland in what is now the Czech Republic. Ninety-one people were killed during this uncontrolled riot which the police did not try to stop.

That night, Hitler and his henchmen were gathered at the Bürgerbräukeller, a beer hall in Munich, celebrating the anniversary of Hitler’s attempt to take over the German government by force in 1923; Hitler’s failed Putsch had been organized at the Bürgerbräukeller.

Joseph Goebbels made a speech, at the beer hall, in which he said that he would not be surprised if the German people were so outraged by the assassination of German diplomat Ernst vom Rath, by a Polish Jew named Herschel Grynszpan, that they would take the law into their own lands and attack Jewish businesses and Synagogues. Goebbels is generally credited with being the instigator of the pogrom. (Pogrom is a Polish word which means an event in which ordinary citizens use violence to drive the Jews out.)

In spite of the Jewish “holy war” against the Nazis, there were no Jews sent to any of the concentration camps solely because they were Jewish, during the first five and a half years that the Nazi concentration camps were in existence. Jews were sent to the Dachau concentration camp, from day one, but it was because they were Communists or trade union leaders, not because they were Jewish.

The first Jews, to be taken into “protective custody” in Germany, simply because they were Jewish, were arrested during the pogrom on the night of November 9th & 10th in 1938, which the Nazis named Kristallnacht (Night of Broken Glass).

Kristallnacht was the night that German citizens smashed windows in Jewish shops and set fire to over 200 Jewish Synagogues throughout Germany, Austria and the Sudetenland in what is now the Czech Republic. Ninety-one people were killed during this uncontrolled riot which the police did not try to stop.

That night, Hitler and his henchmen were gathered at the Bürgerbräukeller, a beer hall in Munich, celebrating the anniversary of Hitler’s attempt to take over the German government by force in 1923; Hitler’s failed Putsch had been organized at the Bürgerbräukeller.

Joseph Goebbels made a speech, at the beer hall, in which he said that he would not be surprised if the German people were so outraged by the assassination of German diplomat Ernst vom Rath, by a Polish Jew named Herschel Grynszpan, that they would take the law into their own lands and attack Jewish businesses and Synagogues. Goebbels is generally credited with being the instigator of the pogrom. (Pogrom is a Polish word which means an event in which ordinary citizens use violence to drive the Jews out.)

Approximately 30,00 Jewish men were arrested during the pogrom, allegedly for their own protection, and taken to the 3 major concentration camps in Germany, including 10,911 who were brought to Dachau and held as prisoners while they were pressured to sign over their property and leave the country.

The majority of these Jews were released within a few weeks, after they had promised to leave Germany within six months; most of them wound up in Shanghai, the only place that did not require a visa, because other countries, except Great Britain, refused to take them.

In anticipation of such violence against the Jews by the Nazis, President Franklin D. Roosevelt had invited 32 countries to a Conference in Evian, France in July 1938 to discuss the problem of Jewish refugees.

The only country which agreed to allow Jewish refugees, as immigrants. was the Dominican Republic; 5,000 German Jews emigrated to the Dominican Republic before the start of World War II.

The American Congress refused to change the US immigration laws, passed in 1920 and 1921, to allow a higher quota of Jewish refugees from Germany to enter, although America did start filling the quota under the existing laws for the first time. The poor Jews — no country wanted them!

 

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