Scrapbookpages Blog

October 26, 2016

the Holocaust of the bullets

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust, World War II — Tags: , , , — furtherglory @ 7:33 am

Today, I am writing about the “Holocaust of Bullets” which refers to the mass shooting of Jews and others when Germany invaded the Soviet Union.

Normally, when a country goes to war, it means that people, in another country, get shot. But it is a crime when a war includes the shooting of Jews, who are a special category: God’s Chosen People. It is a crime to shoot Jews during a war.

The following quote is from the news article about the “Holocaust of Bullets”:

Begin quote:

The exhibition, which opened [in Berlin] late last month, confronts the mass murder of Jews and other minorities after the Nazis invaded the Soviet Union in June 1941. For all the attention paid to the past here, this display is the first in Germany to focus solely on those executions of more than two million people. Their bodies fell into pits, which were then covered and left as anonymous mass graves.

This “Holocaust of the bullets,” as it has come to be known, is deeply familiar to citizens of the former Soviet Union, particularly in Ukraine, Belarus, the Baltics and large parts of western Russia. The very oldest people in those places have vivid, direct memories; those who are middle-aged were raised on Soviet documentaries and war movies; and the young are exposed to modern displays of remembrance.

In Germany, however, the mass shootings are less known than the gas chambers and horrors of Auschwitz, Treblinka and other camps in Nazi-occupied Poland.

End quote

I first learned about the Holocaust of Bullets when I visited the Wannsee Museum near Berlin. I wrote about this on my website at

http://www.scrapbookpages.com/EasternGermany/Wannsee/Museum.html

On the day that I visited the Wannsee Museum in 1999, I had just visited the Memorial Site at the former Sachsenhausen concentration camp located in Oranienburg, a few miles away. The museum and displays at Sachsenhausen show the biased viewpoint of the Communist resistance fighters against the Nazis, while the Wannsee Museum reflects the viewpoint of the Jewish victims of the Holocaust. Both of these museums are careful to leave out all information that might be favorable to the Nazis.

The entire display in the Wannsee villa is relatively small and does not cover the Holocaust, nor the 12 years of the Nazi regime, in any great depth.

Section 5 in the Wannsee Museum is about the “Mass Executions” by the Nazis. Details are given about the shooting of the Jews by the Einsatzgruppen. There is a telex message on display, dated June 29, 1941 from Reinhard Heydrich to the commanders of the four Einsatzgruppen, which reads as follows:

Begin quote from telex message:

Efforts to carry out purges on the part of anti-Communist or anti-Jewish groups in the territories to be newly occupied must not be hampered. On the contrary, they are to be provoked although without leaving traces – if necessary intensified and carefully guided in the right direction. This must be done in such a way that these local ‘self defense groups’ will not be able to claim later on that they were given instructions or political assurances.

End quote