Scrapbookpages Blog

June 12, 2017

Holocaust survivor is comparing Trump’s mass deportation to the arrests of Jewish people by the Nazis

Filed under: Germany, Trump, Uncategorized — Tags: , , , — furtherglory @ 5:01 pm

The following quote is from a news article which you can read at http://www.dailykos.com/story/2017/6/12/1671099/–It-s-tearing-families-apart-Watch-Holocaust-survivor-s-testimony-condemning-ICE-arrests

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Holocaust survivor testifies

Begin quote from news article:

A Holocaust survivor and U.S. military veteran testified against anti-immigrant bills pending in the Michigan House of Representatives, describing a childhood lived in constant fear and comparing Trump’s mass deportation force to the arrests of Jewish people by the Nazis.

Civil rights advocate, Rene Lichtman, 79, noted his testimony fell on the anniversary of the tragic 1939 voyage of the SS St. Louis. Due to anti-Jewish hostility, the ship—carrying nearly 1,000 Jewish refugees—was turned away from Canada, Cuba, and the U.S. While a handful were able to disembark in Cuba, the rest were forced to return to Europe and an untold number died in the Holocaust.

At times holding up old black and white photos of family members, Lichtman warned legislators—and the rest of us—that he now sees “a lot of parallels” in the Trump era.

End quote

In spite of the fact that his son-in-law Jared Kushner is Jewish, Trump does not seem to have much sympathy for the Jews.

May 31, 2017

The Theresienstadt gas chamber

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust, Uncategorized — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 5:18 pm

Did Theresienstadt have a gas chamber?  According to this news article, it did.

https://patch.com/illinois/yorkville/holocaust-survivor-steen-metz-shares-his-story-autumn-creek-elementary-sixth

My photo of the place where the alleged gas chamber was located at Theresienstadt

The following is a quote from the news article:

Begin quote

YORKVILLE, IL – Holocaust survivor Steen Metz shared his story with sixth-grade students at Autumn Creek Elementary School in Yorkville.

Metz was 8-years-old on Oct. 2, 1943 when he was taken from his home in Odense, Denmark. He was arrested with his family and deported to the Theresienstadt concentration camp for being Jewish. In the camps, Metz said there was constant hunger, brutal living conditions, and death all around.

About 15,000 children passed through the Theresienstadt concentration camp and most were killed. Metz was only one of the less than 1,500 who survived.

His father died of starvation after less than six months in the camp. He spent about 18 months in the concentration camp with his mother before it was liberated on April 15, 1945 by the Red Cross – only one month before the scheduled launch of the camp’s newly installed gas chamber. Metz returned to Denmark and completed high school and business college in Copenhagen.

End quote

On my scrapbookpages website, I wrote about Theresienstadt and I mentioned the gas chamber on this page: https://www.scrapbookpages.com/CzechRepublic/Theresienstadt/TheresienstadtGhetto/History/GhettoHistory.html

 

April 11, 2017

short poem written by a Holocaust survivor

Filed under: Holocaust, Uncategorized — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 10:20 am

birkenauchildren1.jpeg

The photo above shows child survivors of the Auschwitz-Birkenau death camp, who are showing their tattoo.

You can read a short poem, written by a Holocaust survivor, here: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/harry-borden-survivor-photography_us_58ebf7e8e4b0c89f9120b711

Begin quote:

In Limbo
In the black hole of our
Planet Earth
Auschwitz
They drove me out when it ceased to be;
Yet who will drive it out of me?
It still exists.
Only death will be my exorcist.

End quote

Correct me if I am wrong, but I believe that “Limbo” is a place where Catholics go if they have not been baptized before they die.  I don’t think that there were ever any Jews in Limbo. On the other hand, there were Catholic prisoners in the Nazi death camps, and this poem was probably written by a Catholic.

Here is one definition of limbo which you can read at

http://www.dictionary.com/browse/limbo

March 10, 2017

The story of Franceska Mann — what really happened?

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust, Uncategorized — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 9:38 am

You can read a recent article about Franceska Mann at http://www.snopes.com/franceska-mann/

The beautiful Franceska Mann is shown in the photo above

This quote is from the article:

The story of Franceska Mann and her purported defiance of Nazis as she faced death has gained popularity on social media.

I have blogged about Franceska Mann on these two blog posts:

https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2010/02/11/josef-schillinger-the-ss-man-who-was-shot-in-the-undressing-room-of-gas-chamber-2-at-auschwitz/

https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2015/01/19/holocaust-survivor-gives-a-new-version-of-the-story-of-franceska-mann/

 

February 25, 2017

Holocaust survivor says Donald Trump is not the human being to be president

Filed under: Dachau, Holocaust, Trump, Uncategorized — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 2:30 pm

The following quote is from a news article which you can read in full at https://collegian.com/2017/02/holocaust-survivor-shares-experience-in-auschwitz/

Begin quote

[Fanny] Starr is concerned that under the current presidential administration, she will become a victim again.

“I’m very much against this government, and I’m very scared I will become a victim again,” Starr said. “(President Donald Trump) is not the human being to be president.”

Starr says she continues to speak to counteract anti-Semitism present in the world today.

The following quote is from the news artical:

Begin quote

Fanny Starr said she lost her will to live when she entered the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp months before it was liberated by the British.

“I told my sister, ‘I don’t want to live. I don’t have nobody,’” Starr said upon entering Bergen-Belsen.

Starr said her sister, Rena Alter, grabbed her by the collar of her striped outfit.

“She grabbed me by my clothes, stood me up and said, ‘This is our life, no mom, no dad,’” Starr said.

fanny-starr-elliott-jerge2.jpg
Fanny Starr, this year’s featured speaker for Holocaust Awareness Week, shares her story about surviving internment in several Nazi concentration camps during World War II. (Elliott Jerge | Collegian)

Starr shared her experience as a Holocaust survivor in the Nazi concentration camps with over 1200 students Wednesday night for the 20th annual Holocaust Awareness Week. Rebecca Chapman, a freshman at East High School, and Alex Ingber, the Vice President of Students for Holocaust Awareness, asked Starr questions about the Holocaust.

Starr, born in 1922, was a teenager when her family was forced into the Lodz ghetto.

According to Starr, there was very little food, and people received food once a month if they were lucky.

Starr and her family were taken to Auschwitz in a train car of nearly 60 people after the [Lodz] ghetto was liquidated in 1944.

Starr remembers Auschwitz as a horrid place where the Jewish people were stripped of their clothes, and their identities were reduced to numbers. She remembers seeing the writing “Arbei Macht Frei” and Dr. Josef Mengele in his black uniform as she got off the train.

Starr remembers how [Dr.] Mengele assessed each Jew who got off the train and decided who looked healthy enough to work or who would be sent to the gas chambers.

“My youngest sister, (as) we were standing in the line to see him, … pinched my cheeks, and I pinched her cheeks to look (healthy),” Starr said.

Starr remembers laying in a field in Auschwitz, looking up at the night sky as bodies burned in the ovens.

“The sky was red, and the smell was horrid,” Starr said. “You could smell the body smell and the hair smell. We could see the ashes coming down like snow.”

Starr lost her mother and two siblings to the gas chambers in Auschwitz. Her father starved in Dachau.

She said she and her sister came to America in 1951. Starr said they visited a cemetery to say their goodbyes to family members even though their family’s bodies “were just ashes.”

End quote

What can I say about this? She is a typical “liar, liar, pants on fire” Jewish Holocaust survivor.

October 21, 2016

Happy birthday to Holocaust survivor who is 107 years old

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust, Uncategorized — Tags: , , , — furtherglory @ 9:05 am

On this website, you can read about a Holocaust survivor who has just celebrated her 107th birthday: http://www.cincinnati.com/story/news/2016/10/20/cincinnatis-oldest-holocaust-survivor-turns-107/92493860/

The following quote is from the news article:

Begin quote

… [in 1941] the Holocaust perpetrated by Nazi Germany was eight years into the mass slaughter of Jews. At the end of WWII, 6 million Jews would be killed, with nearly a quarter million coming from Slomovits’ home of Romania.

Esther Slomovits turned 107 Thursday. She’s Cincinnati’s oldest Holocaust survivor.

The Slomovits were loaded onto a train for deportation to a Nazi death camp, but Sidney’s former employer bribed someone to stop the train, rescuing the Slomovits’.

End quote

How does one stop a speeding train? When I was a child, I lived only a stone’s throw from the tracks of the Missosuri-Pacific railroad line. It never occurred to me that I could have bribed someone to stop a train going through my town, so that I could get a passenger off the train. The passengers on the train used to lean out the window and wave to me. Were they signaling to me because they wanted me to stop the train so that they could escape?

The most important part of this story is her secrets to living a long life. The following quote is about her habits:

Begin quote:

The key to her longevity, she said, is spending time with those you love, being in nature, a hearty breakfast, substituting honey for sugar and “on your 107th birthday, celebrate with sponge food cake – no icing!”

End quote

The important part of her secret to longevity is that she eats honey instead of sugar. So far, I have lived to the age of 83, and I never touch sugar. If I need to sweeten my food, I use raw honey.

 

July 17, 2016

Throw Mama from the train a kiss

Filed under: Germany, movies, World War II — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 7:30 pm

The following quote, from this news article, made me think of a famous line, allegedly spoken by immigrants to America, and I used it for the title of my blog post.

Begin quote from news article:

A Holocaust survivor has relived the childhood horror of watching a Nazi death squad gun down her mother, during a talk at a Baldock school.

End quote

Note that Hannah’s mother was gunned down “during a talk at a Baldock school.”

The photo of Hannah Lewis, shown below, was included in the news article. LitttleHannah

The following quote is from the news article:

Hannah was born in 1937 in Włodawa, a market town in eastern Poland where Jews made up about half the population before the war and the Nazi occupation.

In 1943 she and her family were rounded up and sent to a forced labour camp in Adampol.

Her father and cousin were able to escape, join the resistance and warn Haya that a Nazi Einsatzgruppe (death squad) was on the way – but Haya stayed because she was unable to move Hannah, who had typhus.

On liberation Hannah was found starved and hiding in a ditch by a Red Army soldier, and was reunited with her father. She moved to Britain in 1949 and now has four children and eight grandchildren.

End quote

The Death’s Head symbol was worn by the Einsatzgruppen, the soldiers who followed behind the regular troops, killing the Communists and Jews, when the German Army invaded Russia on June 22, 1941. The Death’s Head symbol was also worn by the guards in the Nazi concentration camps.

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General Sepp Dietrich is shown wearing a death’s head emblem on his cap

 

April 23, 2016

How an 11-year-old Jewish boy was saved from the gas chamber twice by his father

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust — Tags: , , , — furtherglory @ 8:50 am
2005 photo of the remains of the Birkenau camp

2005 photo of remains of Birkenau camp

The following quote is from this news article:

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskatoon/holocaust-survivor-saskatoon-auschwitz-1.3540381

The article tells the story of how an 11-year-old boy was saved twice, by his father, from a gas chamber in Auschwitz-Birkenau.

Normally, an 11-year-old boy would have stayed with his mother at Birkenau, not with his father, while waiting for his turn to be gassed.

Women and children waiting to go into the gas chamber at Birkenau

Women and children waiting to go into the gas chamber at Birkenau

The women and children in the photo above are looking across the road toward the Sauna in Birkenau where the incoming Jews took a shower, and their clothing was disinfected with Zyklon-B.

There were 4 large homicidal gas chambers at the 425-acre Auschwitz-Birkenau camp, plus two old farmhouses where Jews were routinely  gassed with the deadly poison called Zyklon-B, which was also used to kill lice.

Ruins of Krema II gas chamber

Ruins of Krema II gas chamber

The following quote is from the news article, cited above:

Begin quote

Seventy-one years after the Holocaust, a concentration camp survivor told his story about his father saved his life while at the deadly concentration camp Auschwitz.

On Sunday, Nate Leipciger, 88, shared his remarkable survivor story at the annual Saskatoon Holocaust Memorial at the Agudas Israel Synagogue on McKinnon Avenue in Saskatoon [Canada].

He told the packed room how, as a boy in Auschwitz, he didn’t fully grasp what the Nazis had in store for the Jews.

“At 11 years old, I had no idea that the Nazis are going to murder us,” Leipciger said. “Not even when I was standing in front of the gas chamber in Auschwitz, did it occur to me that my life was going to be in danger.”

The article continues with this quote:

Begin Quote

He [Nate Leipciger] told the audience how at one point, he found himself in line for the deadly gas chamber. But his father acted fast, pulling Leipciger out of the lineup, taking him into the concentration camp, where he then saw the unforgiving labour camps and conditions men and women lived in.

That’s when we found out what they were doing to our people, they told us, that our people are now being processed in the gas chamber and that our lifespan in Birkenau was four months–either we get shipped out to Germany or we will end up in the gas chamber. Not a very good future.”

His father’s second heroic moment came when the Nazis were ready to ship Leipciger’s father to a factory in Germany, but his father made a case to a Nazi officer to bring his son along with him.

“At the risk of his own life my father approached [a Nazi officer] and begged him to let me go with him to Germany to a factory and that’s how I was saved from certain death of gassing at Auschwitz,” Leipciger said.

End quote

My photo of a fence that divided the men's camp from the wo

My photo of a fence that divided sections of the Birkenau camp

The Auschwitz-Birkenau camp is huge, covering 425 acres. The boundaries of the Birkenau camp stretch a mile in one direction and a mile and a half in the other direction. When construction, on the camp, was completed, it had over 300 buildings with a capacity of 200,000 prisoners. The entire Birkenau camp was enclosed by an electrified barbed wire fence around the perimeter of the camp.

The interior of the camp was divided into nine sections and each section was surrounded by another electrified barbed wire fence. Men and women were in separate sections, and the younger children stayed in the women’s section. An 11-year-old boy would probably have been put into the women’s camp.

Young boys walking out of the Birkenau camp after it was liberated

Young boys walking out of the Birkenau camp after it was liberated

There were many young boys, aged 11 or younger, who survived Auschwitz-Birkenau.

 

January 28, 2016

Edith Eger is still out telling her sad Holocaust story to American students

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 12:38 pm
Holocaust Survivor who is still out speaking to American students

Holocaust Survivor who is still out speaking to American students

I previously blogged about Edith Eger on these two blog posts:

https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2010/02/13/holocaust-survivor-turned-cartwheels-at-auschwitz/

https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2015/07/05/the-ballerina-of-auschwitz-is-still-alive-and-still-kicking/

Now Edith Eger is back in the news:

http://www.latimes.com/socal/daily-pilot/news/tn-dpt-me-0128-holocaust-survivor-20160127-story.html

The following quote is from the news article, cited above:

Auschwitz was liberated by Soviet forces on Jan. 27, 1945. Having survived disease and slave labor in the camp, [Edith] Eger immigrated to the United States in 1949.

She became a clinical psychologist specializing in the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder. She now lives in La Jolla [California].

Eger also is a great-grandmother to three boys whom she calls her greatest pride and joy.

“I was always told [in Auschwitz] that the only way I was going to get out was as a corpse,” Eger said. “I knew that on any day I could be beaten or sent to the gas chamber. But I knew no matter what, they could never murder my spirit.”

Another date, known as Yom Hashoah at the beginning of May, also is dedicated within the Jewish community to remembering the Holocaust, Keller said.
Copyright © 2016, Daily Pilot

End quote
I marvel at how Holocaust Survivors are able to carry on, visiting colleges to educate young people about the greatest crime in the world — the Holocaust.  I often wonder why these people are so healthy and hearty in their old age.

 

November 29, 2015

Holocaust survivor who ate grass between the rails on the train tracks to Auschwitz

Filed under: Dachau, Holocaust — Tags: , , , — furtherglory @ 5:40 pm

Today, I read a story about Holocaust survivors, which you can read in full here.

The following quote is from the news story:

One woman was packed into a boxcar bound for Auschwitz. So crowded, no one could sit down. People began to starve. The woman, who was a girl then, was extraordinarily tall, with very long arms. There was a hole in the boxcar floor. When the train would stop, she was able to reach her long arms down through the hole and pull up handfuls of grass.

That’s how she survived.

By eating grass.

Railroad tracks usually don't have grass growing between the rails

Railroad tracks usually don’t have grass growing between the rails

This story caught my attention because, as a child, I lived in a house near the railroad tracks that went through my town. I used to put pennies on the track, so that the trains would flatten them.  This was probably a dangerous thing to do, since this might have derailed a train.  But nothing happened, and here I am today, writing a blog.

From my childhood experience, I know that grass does not grow in the middle of the tracks, as long as there are trains traveling on the tracks.  When the tracks are no longer being used, there might be some grass growing between the rails.

I took this photo of some abandoned tracks going into the SS camp at Dachau

I took this photo of some abandoned tracks going into the SS camp at Dachau

 

Another photo which I took of the same tracks at Dachau

Another photo which I took of the same tracks at Dachau

This quote is from the same news article:

World War II ended 70 years ago; children who survived the Holocaust are now in their 80s, adults in their 90s. Nearly 140,000 survivors live in the U.S.

In 15 years, most survivors will be dead.

That’s why Pregulman — who graduated from McCallie School, splits his time between Memphis and Denver, is the son of Merv and Helen Pregulman and grandson of Garrison and Goldie Siskin, founders of Siskin Children’s Institute — began his portrait project, taking survivor photographs as an act of memory and honor.

“To be sure they are not forgotten,” he said.

I believe that stories like this do more harm than good for the Holocaust industry.

 

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