Scrapbookpages Blog

May 29, 2017

Japanese-American soldiers who fought in the American army

Filed under: Dachau, Uncategorized, World War II — Tags: , — furtherglory @ 4:29 pm

Who remembers that Japanese-American soldiers fought in the American army in World War II?

This news article brings the memories of the Japanese-American soldiers back: http://www.timesofisrael.com/these-us-soldiers-liberated-dachau-while-their-own-families-were-locked-up-back-home/

I have a whole section on my scrapbookpages.com website about these Japanese-American soldiers: https://www.scrapbookpages.com/DachauScrapbook/DachauLiberation/LiberationDay3A.html

The following quote is from my website:

The 522nd Field Artillery Battalion of the 442nd Regimental Combat Team, which consisted entirely of Japanese-American soldiers, is acknowledged by the US Army as the liberators of one of the 123 sub-camps of Dachau, and also as the liberators, on May 2, 1945, of some of the prisoners who were on a death march out of the main Dachau camp.

The Go for Broke National Education Center web site has the following information about the sub-camp that was liberated by Japanese soldiers in the 522nd Field Artillery Battalion:

On April 29, 1945, several scouts were east of Munich in the small Bavarian town of Lager Lechfield when they saw a sight they would never forget. The Nisei came upon some barracks encircled by barbed wire.

Technician Fourth Grade Ichiro Imamura described it in his diary:
“I watched as one of the scouts used his carbine to shoot off the chain that held the prison gates shut. . . They weren’t dead, as he had first thought. When the gates swung open, we got our first good look at the prisoners. Many of them were Jews. They were wearing striped prison suits and round caps. It was cold and the snow was two feet deep in some places. There were no German guards. The prisoners struggled to their feet. . . They shuffled weakly out of the compound. They were like skeletons – all skin and bones. . .”

Holocaust historians conclude that the Nisei liberated Kaufering IV Hurlach. This camp housed about 3,000 prisoners. Hurlach was one of 169 subordinate slave labor camps of Dachau.

Contrary to claims made by the Go for Broke National Education Cener, the United States Holocaust Memorial Musuem and the US Army credit the 12th Armored Division of the US Seventh Army with the liberation of the Kaufering IV sub-camp of Dachau on April 27, 1945 with help from soldiers in the 101st Airborne Division, who arrived on April 28, 1945. Kaufering IV was one of 11 camps, all named Kaufering and numbered I through XI, which were located near Landsberg am Lech, not far from the city of Munich. Kaufering IV, which was near the town of Hurlach, had been designated as a sick camp where prisoners who could no longer work were sent.

End quote from my website.

April 27, 2010

George F. Will’s article about Japanese Americans liberating Dachau

Filed under: Dachau, Germany, Holocaust, World War II — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 10:26 am

On April 25, 2010, the Washington Post published an article by George F. Will with the headline, “Japanese American heroes, bereft of bitterness.”  The gist of the article is that the Japanese-American soldiers, who fought in Germany during World War II, were liberating Dachau while their families were imprisioned in internment camps in America, but they’re not bitter.

Here is a quote from the article:

By March 1945, the 442nd was in southern Germany. Soon it was at Dachau. Eddie Ichiyama of Santa Clara, Calif., who also was here recently, says that “even right now” he can smell the stench. The ovens were still warm. On a nearby railroad flatbed car, what looked to be a supply of cordwood was actually stacked corpses.

[…]

Such cheerful men, who helped to lop 988 years off the Thousand Year Reich, are serene reproaches to a nation now simmering with grievance groups that nurse their cherished resentments. The culture of complaint gets no nourishment from men like these who served their country so well while it was treating their families so ignobly. Yet it is a high tribute to this country that it is so loved by men such as these.

Japanese-American soldiers liberated prisoners on a “death march”

The 522nd Field Artillery Battalion of the 442nd Regimental Combat Team, which consisted entirely of Japanese-American soldiers, is acknowledged by the US Army as the liberators of one of the 123 sub-camps of Dachau, and also as the liberators, on May 2, 1945, of some of the prisoners who were on a death march out of the main Dachau camp.  The photo above shows Japanese-American soldiers on May 2, 1945, as they liberated Dachau prisoners from a “death march” out of the main camp.

Jews and Russian POWs were marched out of Dachau before the camp was liberated

The 442nd Regimental Combat Team, which was composed of second generation Japanese-Americans (Nisei), but commanded by Caucasian officers, was a volunteer unit that was created on February 1, 1943. One third of the soldiers in the 442nd were recruited from the 70,000 native-born Japanese-Americans, who had been interned on the American mainland, and the remainder were Japanese-American volunteers from Hawaii.

Will’s article is disingenuous.  He is falling all over himself to be politically correct, as he praises a minority group.  He quotes Eddie Ichiyama’a description of  the Dachau main camp. If Will had done a little research, he would have known that Ichiyama could not have been at the Dachau main camp on the day it was liberated, April 29, 1945.