Scrapbookpages Blog

September 29, 2014

Vergangenheitsbewältigung is failing in Germany and anti-Semitism is on the march

According to a news article which you can read in full here, “With anti-Semitism on the march, Germany’s politicians and opinion makers are grappling with what went wrong with the country’s seven-decade-long struggle to come to terms with its past, or as they call it, Vergangenheitsbewältigung.”

In other words, the Germans can never bow low enough to the Jews; they can never build enough monuments in honor of the Holocaust; nor can they ever pay enough restitution to the Jews.

I previously blogged about this on this blog post: https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2014/07/05/american-pastor-jobst-bittner-thinks-todays-germans-have-original-sin-and-collective-guilt-for-the-holocaust/

I also blogged about the number of German Jews who were killed in the Holocaust: https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2011/02/02/how-many-german-jews-were-killed-in-the-holocaust/

This quote is from the news article cited above:

Since the Holocaust, Germany has measured its progress by how the country treats Jews. For example, the government provided generous funding to rebuild Jewish communities and allowed Jews from the former Soviet Union to relocate to Germany. But with a rising tide of anti-Semitism in recent months, there are now questions about how significant the culture of Holocaust remembrance has been in preventing hatred of Jews.

The wave of modern anti-Semitic rhetoric and violence inundating Germany in recent months jolted Chancellor Angela Merkel and religious and political leaders to participate in a “Stand-Up: Jew-Hatred-Never Again!” rally organized on Sept. 14 by the Central Council of Jews in Germany in the heart of Berlin’s government district, not far from the country’s national Holocaust memorial.

Today’s Germans cannot walk three feet without literally stumbling on Stolpersteine, which are stumbling stones honoring individual Jews who lost their lives in the Holocaust, as well as some Jews who survived the Holocaust.

Stumbling stones in Heidelberg in honor of Max and Olger Mayer

Stumbling stones in Heidelberg in honor of two German Jews Max and Olga Mayer

Thanks to Hitler and the Transfer Agreement, the Jews now have their own country, but they don’t have to live in it. The Jews can live in any country in the world, where they can set up their monuments and museums.

In spite of this, the Jews still want to live in Germany.

This quote is from the news article:

The list of anti-Semitic incidents [in Germany] between July and early September is long. Protests against Israel’s Operation Protective Edge in Gaza led seamlessly to Molotov cocktails tossed at a synagogue in Wuppertal, a city in western Germany, on July 29 — the first torching of a Wuppertal synagogue was during the Hitler era in 1938. Anti-Israel protesters attacked Jews for wearing kippot on the streets of Berlin in a couple of incidents in July. And that’s just a taste.

German authorities recorded 184 anti-Semitic incidents in June and July. According to a study by German human rights NGO Amadeu Antonio Foundation, there were 25 anti-Semitic incidents in August.

To me, the two photos below illustrate why Jews and Germans should not live in the same country. The first photo shows a Jewish Museum in Berlin and the second photo shows the entrance into the Museum through a traditional German building.

Jewish museum in Berlin

Jewish museum in Berlin

Traditional German building right next to the Jewish Museum

Traditional German building right next to the Jewish Museum

 

November 6, 2013

“notorious anti-British Jewish activist” will speak at the 75th commemoration of Kristallnacht at the Jewish Museum in Berlin

November 9th will mark the 75th anniversary of Kristallnacht, aka the “Night of Broken Glass” when Jewish businesses, homes and Synagogues were destroyed throughout Nazi Germany.  Jewish men were arrested and sent to concentration camps, while their families tried to find a country to which Jews could emigrate.

Jewish men were arrested after Kristallnacht and sent to Dachau and other camps

Jewish men were arrested after Kristallnacht and sent to Dachau and other camps

On November 8, 2013, in commemoration of this historic event, Brian Klug, a notorious anti-Israel British Jewish activist, will speak at the Jewish Museum in Berlin. Klug, who denies there is a new anti-Semitism, will speak on the topic “What do we mean when we say ‘antisemitism’?”

This quote is from a news article which you can read in full here:

At its Kristallnacht commemoration on Friday evening, Nov. 8, the Jewish Museum Berlin – which many consider to be Europe’s leading Jewish museum – will feature as its keynote speaker Brian Klug, a notorious anti-Israel British Jewish activist. Klug, who denies there is a new anti-Semitism, will speak on the topic “What do we mean when we say ‘antisemitism’?”

Chancellor Angela Merkel

Chancellor Angela Merkel

In response, Shimon Samuels wrote the following open letter to German’s Chancellor Angela Merkel. Samuels is director for International Relations of the Simon Wiesenthal Center. He has served as deputy director of the Leonard Davis Institute for International Relations at Hebrew University of Jerusalem, European director of the Anti-Defamation League, and Israel Director of the American Jewish Committee. He was born in the UK and studied in UK, Israel, U.S. and Japan.

Madam Federal Chancellor, we are about to mark the 75th anniversary of the Kristallnacht Reichspogrom – the Night of Broken Glass State Pogrom – which is considered the prelude to the Nazi Holocaust.

The photo below shows the Jewish Museum in Berlin, where Brian Klug will speak.

Jewish Museum in Berlin

Jewish Museum in Berlin

This quote is from the news article:

Madam Chancellor, the Berlin Jewish Museum has been architecturally described as “a warped Star of David” due to its zigzag structure. The museum’s management is indeed warping the Jewish Star. One of its display halls is called “The Void,” which holds the Israeli artist Kadishman’s stamped metallic faces, dramatically redolent of the gas chambers. That vacuum is becoming pervaded by the noxious fumes of a new Jew-hatred.

The photos below show “The Void” in the Jewish Museum.  The faces are supposed to be “redolent of the gas chamber.”  Who knew?

The "Memory Void" tower in the Jewish Museum

The “Memory Void” tower in the Jewish Museum

The "Fallen Leaves" in the Memory Void Tower

The “Fallen Leaves” in the Memory Void Tower in the Jewish Museum

"Faces" in the "Fallen Leaves" in the Memory Void tower

“Faces” in the “Fallen Leaves” in the Memory Void tower

When I visited the Jewish Museum in 2001, the year that it opened, I thought that the “faces” were supposed to represent the faces of the Jews who were killed in the Holocaust.  I didn’t know that the faces were supposed to be “redolent” of the gas chambers.  This just goes to show you how difficult it is for the goyim to understand the minds of Jews.

I hope that Angela Merkel can understand what the Jews are saying.  This quote is from the news article:

Was the Berlin Jewish Museum created, at the cost of Germany’s taxpayers and international donations, to demonize Israel, serve as a fig leaf for antisemitism and to commit memoricide – the murder of the memory of those murdered?

Madam Chancellor, we are deeply aware that the Museum’s actions contravene your personal position and over sixty years of your own and your predecessors’ efforts for German reconciliation with the Jewish people and a commitment to the security of the State of Israel.

Our Centre thus urges your Chancellery to condemn the Museum’s distortion of its role, launch an enquiry into its behavior and suspend public funding until a new management is appointed.

At this point in the story, a little history of the city of Berlin might be helpful.

When Adolf Hitler became the Chancellor of Germany in 1933, there were 585,000 Jews living in Germany. The largest Jewish community was in Berlin, which had 160,000 Jewish residents. Only 7,000 Jews returned to Berlin after the war.

The Jews had been expelled from Berlin in 1573 and had not been allowed back into the city for 100 years. When the Jews were finally allowed back into Berlin, they were never forced to live in a ghetto, although the Eastern European Orthodox Jews lived in the Jewish quarter called the Scheunenviertel, northwest of the Alexanderplatz.

When the separate German states were finally united into a country by Otto von Bismarck in 1871, the German Jews were granted full rights of citizenship, which was unusual for that time when the Russian Jews were still being forced to live on a reservation called the Pale of Settlement. The only other European country with a large population of Jews, in which they had been granted full rights, was Austria.

Bismarck was a friend of the Jews and in 1866, he was present when Berlin’s grand Neue Synagogue was opened at Number 30 Oranienburger Strasse.

The Berlin Synagogue was restored after it was destroyed on Kristallnacht

The Berlin Synagogue was restored after it was destroyed on Kristallnacht

The  Berlin Synagogue, shown in the photo above, was burned during Kristallnacht on November 9, 1938, but the blaze was put out before much damage was done. The Nazis occupied the building in 1940 and desecrated the Synagogue by using it for storage.

The Nazis also destroyed the Jewish cemetery in Berlin.

The Synagogue sustained severe damage by Allied bombs during the war and for years it was left as an empty shell. Restoration began in 1988 and the Synagogue was reopened on May 7, 1995, the 50ieth anniversary of the German surrender in World War II.

Berlin was the residence of Karl Marx, the son and grandson of Jewish rabbis, the man who introduced Communism to the world when he published his Communist Manifesto in 1848. This prompted a revolution in Germany, which failed, and resulted in the emigration of a number of German liberals to America where they became known as the “Forty-Eighters.”  My German relatives were not “48ers.” They came to American in 1852.

Berlin also became the center of the social democratic movement, the worker’s movement and the trade union movement in Germany. Berlin was the headquarters of the Social Democratic Workers Party, founded by Karl Liebknecht and August Bebel.

During World War I, a new militant leftist group, formed by Jewish leaders, Karl Liebknecht and Rosa Luxemburg, agitated for the overthrow of the Kaiser and the end of the war. The war effort was hampered when 300,000 workers went on strike in January 1918. In November 1918, there was a naval mutiny and a strike of the dock workers.

Finally, on November 9, 1918, Philipp Scheidemann, the Jewish leader of the Social Democrats, proclaimed the first German Republic from a window of the Reichstag building in Berlin.

Twenty years later, the Nazis, who always blamed the Jews for Germany’s defeat in World War I, perpetrated the pogrom which became known as Kristallnacht on November 9, 1938. Thirty thousand Jewish men, many of them from Berlin, were rounded up and sent to the concentration camps at Dachau, Sachsenhausen and Buchenwald. They were held for at least two weeks and then released if they promised to leave Germany within six months.

The German Kaiser was forced to abdicate in November 1918 and the German government was taken over by the SPD (Social Democrats). The Jewish leader Friedrich Ebert was subsequently installed as the first president of the new Republic.

The Armistice, which ended World War I, was signed by Matthias Erzberger, a representative of the Ebert government, on November 11, 1918.

The Nazis would later call the Social Democrats “the November criminals” and characterize the signing of the Armistice as a “stab in the back” for the German people. For the next 20 years, a controversy would rage between the liberal left and the right wing Nazis over whether or not the German army had been defeated on the battlefield, a claim which Hitler called the “Big Lie.”

After the Armistice in 1918, Berlin was in total chaos; the city resembled a war zone with revolutionaries fighting in the streets. Before a new democratic constitution could be written, a militant group of leftists, called the Spartacus League, attempted to set up a soviet government, along the lines of the Communist revolution in Russia in October 1917. Their leader, Karl Liebknecht, proclaimed another Republic from the balcony of the imperial palace in Berlin.  After World War II ended, the Soviets tore down the palace, but preserved the section where the hero Liebknecht had proclaimed the Communist Republic.

The Spartacus League renamed itself the German Communist Party (KPD) and called for a general strike of the workers in January 1919.  A volunteer group of 3,000 former soldiers, called the Freicorps, was called in to restore order. They fought against the Red Front (Communist) soldiers in hand to hand combat on the streets of Berlin.

The leaders of the Communists, Liebknecht and Luxemburg, were dragged from their hiding place and murdered in the Tiergarten park in the center of Berlin. Luxemburg’s body was thrown into the Landwehr Canal. A monument to Rosa Luxemburg now stands in the Tiergarten.

Many of the Nazi leaders, including Reinhard Heydrich and Heinrich Himmler, came from the soldiers, who fought with the Freicorps to put down the Communist Revolution, and the soldiers who fought in World War I, including Adolf Hitler who had been a lance corporal in the German Army. Their memories of the street fighting and the paralyzing workers’ strikes was the source of their later persecution of the Communists, Social Democrats and trade unionists after the Nazis gained power in January 1933.

At the beginning of August 1945, three months after the German surrender, which ended World War II, American President Harry Truman was on his way to Potsdam, a suburb of Berlin, for a conference with Allied leaders Churchill and Stalin, when he took a victory lap around Berlin in an Army Jeep to see the devastation wrought by the Allied bombing.

There was not much left of Berlin to see. The capital city of Germany had been bombed 24 times between November 18, 1943 and March 1944, and sporadic hits continued until the city was captured by the Russian army in April, 1945. By that time, the city had been reduced to 98 million cubic yards of rubble.

Mounds of rubble in Berlin were covered over

Mounds of rubble in Berlin were covered over

Each of the bomb attacks on Berlin involved over 1,000 planes and the dropping of up to 2,000 tons of bombs. Half of the city’s bridges were destroyed and the underground railway tunnels were flooded. There was no gas, electricity or water in the central portion of the city. The pre-war population of 4.3 million had been reduced to 2.8 million, as people were forced to flee the city; some 1.5 million people became homeless when their homes were bombed.

One out of 7, of the buildings destroyed in Germany by the Allied bombing, were in Berlin. Out of a total of 245,000 buildings in Berlin, 50,000 had been completely destroyed and 23,000 had been severely damaged; 80,000 residents of the city had been killed. Even the trees in the Tiergarten, a large park in the center of the city, had been killed in the Battle of Berlin. There were so many historic buildings destroyed that Berliners jokingly referred to the American and British air raids as Baedecker Bombing. Baedecker travel guide books were used by tourists to locate famous and historic buildings.

Is there a Museum in Berlin in honor of the suffering of the goyim in World War II?  No, of course not!  It would be offensive to the Jews to say anything about how non-Jews suffered in World War II, not to mention that this would amount to “Holocaust distortion.”

Three years ago, I wrote another November blog post, which you can read here.

May 7, 2013

Weird Jewish Museum in Berlin gets even weirder…

"Jew in a Box" in the Jewish Museum in Berlin

“Jew in a Box” in the Jewish Museum in Berlin

The sign under the glass box, where a Jew sits in the Jewish Museum in Berlin, says “Gibt es noch Juden in Deutschland?” (Are there still Jews in Germany?)

This quote is from a news article which you can read in full here:

An interactive ‘Jew in a Box’ display at the Jewish Museum in Berlin has attracted scathing criticism from prominent Jewish figures and anti-Semitic comments from visitors.

Last month American Bill Glucroft, 27, climbed into a glass box at the museum, which chronicles Jewish life in the capital and broader Germany, with the caption beneath it reading: “Are there still Jews in Germany?”

Since then, other Jewish people have taken turns to sit in the box.

“A lot of our visitors don’t know any Jews and have questions they want to ask,” said museum official Tina Luedecke.

“With this exhibition we offer an opportunity for those people to know more about Jews and Jewish life.”

But since the start of the exhibit, ‘The Whole Truth, everything you wanted to know about Jews’, it has drawn criticism within the Jewish community.

Before you criticize this weird exhibition, you have to see it in context—with the rest of the Museum, which was deliberately set up to throw people off balance.

The photo below shows the outside of the Museum building, which was designed by Jewish architect Daniel Libeskind.

Exterior of Jewish Museum in Berlin

Exterior of Jewish Museum in Berlin

The design of the Jewish Museum in Berlin is supposed to represent a deconstructed Star of David, as though it has been hit by lightning. The only windows in the museum are the angular slits that you see on the sides of the building. The surface of the building is covered with polished metal facing. There is no door into the exhibits; entry is through a tunnel from the Baroque building next door, which is shown in the photo below.

Entrance to the Jewish Museum in Berlin is through this Baroque building next door

Entrance to the Jewish Museum in Berlin is through this Baroque building next door

Entry to the Jewish Museum is through the Baroque building, shown in the photo above, which was formerly Berlin’s Superior court. The Jewish Museum was originally an annex of the Berlin Museum in the former court building, which is called the Kolliegenhaus. The Berlin Museum was moved back to its original home, and the Jewish Museum opened here as a separate museum in October 2001.

Two contrasting buildings with the Jewish Museum on the right

Sign says “Jewish Museum Berlin”

The two contrasting buildings in the photo above show the difference between the German people and the Jews in Germany.  Be prepared to leave the normal world behind, as you go through a tunnel to get to the Jewish Museum next door to a traditional German building.

Aerial view shows the Jewish Museum on the left, next door to a traditional German building

Aerial view shows the Jewish Museum on the left, next door to a traditional German building

The layout of the Jewish Museum in Berlin

The layout of the Jewish Museum in Berlin

There are no windows in the Jewish Museum building, but narrow slits in the sides of the building allow in some light, which illuminate two of the corridors, as shown in the model above. The whole building is designed to be scary, like a house of horrors. There are no guided tours and visitors may walk about freely, although when I was there in 2001, there were attendants on duty, ready to answer any questions.

The Axis of Evil and the Axis of Continuity

The Axis of Exile and the Axis of Continuity

The photo above shows two of the corridors in the Jewish Museum.  This is where the “axis of Continuity” intersects with the “axis of Exile.” The “axis of Exile,” which represents the deportation of the German Jews by the Nazis, leads outside to a garden, which consists of 49 stone columns with trees planted on top of the columns.  (You can’t get any weirder than that.)

Garden outside Jewish Museum has stone columns planted with trees

Garden outside Jewish Museum has stone columns planted with trees on top

Trees growing out of columns in the garden outside the Jewish Museum

Trees growing out of columns in the garden outside the Jewish Museum — can anything be weirder than that?

The “axis of Continuity” leads to the exhibition space. Together, the three corridors in the Museum represent the three important elements of the Jewish experience, according to the museum designer.

The photos below show the interior of one of the empty towers.

Memory Void tower in the Jewish Museum in Berlin

Memory Void Tower in the Jewish Museum in Berlin

Fallen leaves in the Memory Void Tower

Fallen leaves in the Memory Void Tower

Close-up of Fallen Leaves in the Memory Void Tower

Close-up of Fallen Leaves in the Memory Void Tower

October 22, 2011

Daniel Libeskind building at 601 Capitol Mall in Sacramento, CA….when you get there, it’s not there

Filed under: California — Tags: , , , — furtherglory @ 6:00 pm

In 2005, famous architect Daniel Liebeskind designed a 38-story condo building called Aura, which was to be built at 601 Capitol Mall in Sacramento, CA.  The plan fell through when the developers of the project defaulted on a loan.  The photo below shows Libeskind’s design for the building, which was never built in Sacramento.

Architectural design by Daniel Libeskind for Sacramento

A building with this same design has since been built in Moscow in Russia. The building is shown  on the far right in the photo below.

Liebskin building in Moscow

Liebeskind building in Moscow, shown on the far right

Why should anyone care if the building, shown in the photo above, was built in Sacramento or not?

I’ll tell you why. When this project was first announced in the Sacramento Bee newspaper in 2005, I was horrified.  I had seen one of Daniel Libeskind’s buildings in Berlin, and I did not think that one of his designs would be suitable for Sacramento.  His architectural style has been called “deconstruction.”

My 2001 photo below shows the Jewish Museum in Berlin, which was designed by Daniel Libeskind.

Jewish Museum in Berlin, designed by architect Daniel Libeskind

The ultra modern design of the Jewish Museum in Berlin is intended to be in the form of a deconstructed Star of David, as though the building had been hit by lightning. The only windows are the angular slits that you see on the sides of the building. The surface of the building is covered with polished metal facing. There is no door into the exhibits in the building; entry is through a tunnel from the Baroque building next door, which is shown in the photograph below.

Contrast between buildings in Berlin

You can see some more of Liebeskind’s style of architecture here; there are photos showing what he did to Dresden.  There oughta be a law!

I went down to 601 Capitol Mall today to check out the address; 601 Capitol Mall is currently nothing but a parking lot with a small one-story building which is the office for the building at 621 Capitol Mall.

The description of the proposed building on this website reads as if the building had actually been built:

Situated in the heart of downtown Sacramento, California, the Aura condominium tower at 601 Capitol Mall is reshaping the city’s skyline with a much more modern view. The building, designed by Daniel Libeskind and developed by BCN Development of Denver, both embraces the architect’s signature sculptural forms and steps up the capital city’s architecture a notch.

Rising more than 400 feet above the city’s floor, the 38-story luxury residential tower features a luminous glass façade wrapped with translucent bands of balconies cut by curvilinear lines, which will provide residents with sweeping views of the city and surrounding landscape when it opens in 2007. The 256-unit building will also feature street-level dining, a sidewalk café, a fountain with sculptures, and a pedestrian-friendly lobby, all in the name of encouraging interaction between the tower and lively public space outside. Inside the residences, 10-foot ceilings open up 700-square-foot one-bedroom condos, the 4,400-square-foot penthouse, and everything in between. Other amenities include a landscaped garden, spa facilities, and 24-hour concierge services.

“The sculpted form of the building, its lightweight construction and luminosity, and its seamless interior spaces create an iconic whole greater than the sum of its parts,” says the architect, who is best known for master planning the new World Trade Center site and for designing the Jewish Museum Berlin. He calls Aura, which is his first project in California, “a sculpture that changes with light and the season.”

Libeskind has brought “a sense of energy and vibrancy to the city,” says Craig Nassi, founder and CEO of BCN. A developer for high-end, mixed-use, luxury properties, BCN currently has a combined real estate portfolio valued at more than $500 million.

April 17, 2010

entartete Kunst (degenerate art)

I’ve been doing some research on the locations of Eisenhower’s camps for the German soldiers who surrendered at the end of World War II.  One of these camps was at Sinzig in the vicinity of Remagen, a city on the west bank of the Rhine river.  Remagen is famous as the location of the Ludendorff bridge, which was the bridge where American troops first crossed the Rhine.  The bridge eventually collapsed, and today only the towers are left as a reminder. At the site of the Remagen bridge, there is a piece of artwork that Hitler would have called “entartete Kunst,” which, in English, means “degenerate art.”

Modern art at the site of the Remagen bridge

The photo above shows a modern sculpture which would have been banned by Hitler in the Third Reich.  Putting such art at the site which was a turning point in Germany’s loss of the war is like rubbing salt into a wound.  It is unnecessary “piling on.”  Leave the German people some pride, for pity’s sake.

The towers at the Ludendorff bridge are still standing

There is a time and place for everything.  In my opinion, the site of the Remagen bridge is not the place for modern art; it is a historic site where the German people fought and died, during World War II, for what they believed in.  Whether or not we agree with German ideology during the Third Reich, I don’t think that historic World War II sites in Germany are the proper place for modern art.  It would be like putting Nazi art at a historic site for the American revolution in America.

Cover of book for entartete Kunst exhibition in 1937

In 1937, the Nazis put up an art exhibition in Munich, in which they showed modern art, but for the purpose of showing it as degenerate.  Hitler believed that modern art was influenced by the Jews, and that it was un-German.  He was an artist and amateur architect himself, and he favored traditional art and architecture.

Today, the term “entartete Kunst” is used with great pride in Germany because the German people want to distance themselves from the Third Reich and everything that it represented.

The photo below shows modern art on a church in Berlin.  In my opinion, this is an example of using modern art in a  totally inappropriate way.  This is a church, built in traditional style, that was bombed in World War II; the church was restored and this artwork was added.

Modern Art on a restored church in Berlin

The memorial sites of the concentration camps feature “degenerate art” as a symbol of victory over the Nazis. The Buchenwald memorial site has an art museum which features what Hitler would have considered the most deplorable examples of “entartete Kunst.”  One room in the art gallery is devoted to the work of Artist Jozef Szajna who enlarged photographs of Buchenwald inmates and then pasted these photos on huge cardboard cutouts, as shown in the photographs below.

Artwork in Buchenwald Museum

Artwork done by a Buchenwald survivor

German soldiers look at artwork in Buchenwald museum

German soldiers are required to visit a concentration camp memorial site, just like the German school children are required to be indoctrinated.  The photo above is one of the saddest sights I’ve ever seen.  This is what happens when  a country loses a war.  Imagine if America had lost World War II and we were all required to make a trip to a museum to view Hitler’s traditional paintings.

Protestant Church at Dachau has no right angles

Modern Art in courtyard of Protestant Church at Dachau memorial site

The Protestant Church at the Dachau memorial site was built without any right angles, as a protest against the order and discipline of the Nazis.  An exception was made for the artwork in the courtyard of the church, which is shown in the photo directly above. The photo below shows the altar inside the church with a modern square shaped cross on the wall.  To me, this display of modern art in a church at Dachau is appropriate; it celebrates the victory of the prisoners over the Nazis and their culture.

Altar and modern cross on wall of Dachau church

Sculpture at Zeppelin field in Nürnberg

The photo above shows modern art in front of a Museum at the Zeppelin field in Nürnberg.  Another example of the victors rubbing it in by putting “degenerate art” at a place where the Nazis once demonstrated their power.

The two photos below show the clash of cultures in Germany. The top photo shows traditional architecture, while the second photo illustrates the modern architecture of the Jewish Museum; these two buildings are side by side in the city of Berlin, Germany.

Traditional building in Berlin represents German culture

Jewish Museum in Berlin represents “entartete Kunst”

The ultra modern Jewish Museum building in Berlin, designed by Jewish architect Daniel Libeskind, is intended to be in the form of a deconstructed Star of David, as though it has been hit by lightning. The only windows are the angular slits that you see on the sides of the building. The surface of the building is covered with polished metal facing. There is no door into the exhibits; entry is through a tunnel from the Baroque building next door.

The contrast between the old building and the new modern one illustrates the vast difference in thinking between the Nazis and the Jews. Hitler would have called the Jewish museum building “degenerate” architecture.

The memorial site at the former Dachau concentration camp is the appropriate place for “degenerate art,” such as the International Monument, shown in the photo below.

International monument at Dachau memorial site