Scrapbookpages Blog

July 20, 2017

If you have ever wanted to buy a synagogue, here’s your chance!

Filed under: Holocaust, Uncategorized — Tags: , — furtherglory @ 3:22 pm

Who doesn’t want to buy his or her own synagogue?

Synagogue building for sale

http://www.timesofisrael.com/in-moldova-a-synagogue-with-a-terrible-history-is-for-sale-on-holocaust-street/

Photo of the synagogue shows the building as it once looked

The following quote is from the news article:

Begin quote

DINETS, Moldova — In a small town in northern Moldova, a former synagogue is for sale on Holocaust Street.

The building, where some 90 Jewish townsfolk were executed during World War II, is being offered for 65,000 euros ($75,000) by a Moldovan owner who said that “he wasn’t aware of its history.”

The owner did not wish to give his name, and asked that this journalist [who wrote the story] not take photos inside the crumbling synagogue or in the yard, which he [the owner] currently rents out for approximately $100 per month to a car junkyard.

End quote

Here is an opportunity to buy a synagogue and turn it into a tourist attraction.  The owner could charge admission to the gullible goyim and make a small fortune.

July 7, 2017

Congressman goes inside Auschwitz “gas chamber” and completely misunderstands everything

Filed under: Auschwitz, Germany, Holocaust, Uncategorized — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 10:40 am

Congressman Clay Higgins poses beside two cremation ovens at Auschwitz

My photo of the ovens where Congressman posed

What’s wrong with posing for photos inside the oven room at Auschwitz, you ask?

What the Congressman did was completely disrespectful to the Jews who were gassed and burned during the Holocaust. My photo above shows the back side of the ovens where Jews were burned.

When I visited Auschwitz three times [in 1998, 2005 and 2007] there were signs everywhere, telling tourists that photos were not allowed. I ignored these signs. I am a senile old woman who does not know how to use a camera — my camera kept going off by itself.  That’s my story — and I’m sticking to it.

My photo of the device used to shove the bodies into the oven

Oven on the left — gas chamber on the right

As everyone knows, a gas chamber should not be in a room that is only a few feet from an oven, but the Nazis somehow managed to kill Jews in gas chambers without blowing up the whole building.

My photo of a cremation oven for a single body at Auschwitz

I blogged about Clay Higgins in this earlier blog post.

https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2017/07/05/american-congressman-made-a-video-inside-the-auschwitz-gas-chamber/

June 28, 2017

The Holocaust survivor who jumped off a cliff to save himself

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust, Uncategorized — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 1:08 pm

The following quote is from a news article which you can read in full at https://www.thejc.com/culture/film/destination-unknown-mosberg-film-documentary-holocaust-1.440039

The photo above shows Holocaust survivor Ed Mosberg who is still alive

Begin quote from news article:

Later, [Ed] Mosberg found himself in a sweltering, airless cattle wagon [on a train], also bound for Auschwitz. However, when the transport arrived, it sat on the rails for a night, because “they were too busy at the crematorium [where bodies were burned]. So they never unloaded us and they took us [instead] to Mauthausen.”

End quote from news article

So what was it like in the Mauthausen prison?

My photo of the Mauthausen quarry

After working in the Mauthausen quarry, the prisoners in the “punishment detail” had to carry a heavy rock on their backs, up the steps and out of the quarry. Only the prisoners in the “punishment detail” had to do this.

My photo of the Mauthausen stairs which the prisoners had to climb to get out of the quarry

[How did I mange to take the photo above, you ask.]

I hired a taxi to take me to the bottom of the stairs, early in the morning, before the Memorial Site was open to visitors. [So I cheated! Sue me!]

Begin quote from news article:

He [Ed Mosberg] worked in the quarry, where exhausted prisoners ascended and descended [the] 186 steps, carrying rocks weighing up to 50Kg. “If somebody stopped for a moment, they’d push them to their death. Or they’d beat you. Or they’d shoot you,” says Mosberg. “Mathausen and Gusen – they were the two worst concentration camps, and they were classified that way by the Germans.”

End quote from news article

Actually, the prisoners only had to carry one heavy rock out of the quarry, at the end of the day. And that was only if they were in the punishment group.

My photo of a rock carrier used at Mauthausen

You can read about the death statistics for the Mauthausen camp on my website at http://www.scrapbookpages.com/Mauthausen/KZMauthausen/History/deathstatistics.html

You can read about the Jewish prisoners at Mauthausen on my website at http://www.scrapbookpages.com/Mauthausen/KZMauthausen/History/Jews.html

I have a section about the town of Mauthausen on my website at http://www.scrapbookpages.com/Mauthausen/Town/index.html

When I was doing research on Mauthausen, I was told by many people, all of them Jews, that I should not go to the town because there were Jews waiting there to kill people and take everything that the visitors owned.

I decided to risk it anyway, and I found that the people in the town were the most friendly people that I had ever met. I’m glad that I stayed in the town.  You can see my photos of the town at http://www.scrapbookpages.com/Mauthausen/Town/index.html

June 26, 2017

The voyage of the ship called “The St. Louis” is back in the news

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust, Uncategorized — Tags: , , , — furtherglory @ 11:16 am

The passengers on the ship called “The Saint Louis” wave “goodbye” as the ship leaves — Image copyright Getty Images

You can read about the ship called “The St. Louis” in this news article: http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-27373131

What does this have to do with the price of eggs in China, you ask. It relates to Trump’s current rules on who can enter America.

The following quote is from the news article:

Begin quote

On 13 May 1939, more than 900 Jews fled Germany aboard a luxury cruise liner, the SS St Louis. They hoped to reach Cuba and then travel to the US – but were turned away in Havana and forced to return to Europe, where more than 250 were killed by the Nazis.

“It was really something to be going on a luxury liner,” says Gisela Feldman. “We didn’t really know where we were heading, or how we would cope when we got there.”

At the age of 90, Feldman still clearly remembers the raw and mixed emotions she felt as a 15-year-old girl boarding the St Louis at Hamburg docks with her mother and younger sister.

“I was always aware of how anxious my mother looked, embarking on such a long journey, on her own with two teenage daughters,” she says.

[..]

By early 1939, the Nazis had closed most of Germany’s borders and many countries had imposed quotas limiting the number of Jewish refugees they would allow in.

Cuba was seen as a temporary transit point to get to America and officials at the Cuban embassy in Berlin were offering visas for about $200 or $300 each – $3,000 to $5,000 (£1,800 to £3,000) at today’s prices.

When six-year-old Gerald Granston was told by his father that they were leaving their small town in southern Germany to take a ship to the other side of the world, he struggled to understand what that meant.

“I’d never heard of Cuba and I couldn’t imagine what was going to happen. I remember being scared all the time,” he says, now aged 81.

For many of the young passengers and their parents however, the trepidation and anxiety soon faded as the St Louis began its two-week transatlantic voyage.

Feldman, who shared a cabin in the lower part of the ship with her sister Sonja, spent her time walking around the deck chatting with boys of her own age, or swimming in the ship’s pool.

On board, there was a dance band in the evenings and even a cinema. There were regular meals with a variety of food that the passengers rarely saw back home.

Under orders from the ship’s captain, Gustav Schroder, the waiters and crew members treated the passengers politely, in stark contrast to the open hostility Jewish families had become accustomed to under the Nazis.

The captain allowed traditional Friday night prayers to be held, during which he gave permission for the portrait of Adolf Hitler hanging in the main dining room to be taken down.

Six-year-old Sol Messinger, who was traveling with his father and mother, recalls how happy everyone seemed. In fact, he says, the youngsters were constantly being told by the adults that they were now safe from harm: “We’re going away,” he heard people say again and again on that outward journey. “We don’t have to look over our shoulders any more.”

But as the luxury liner reached the coast of Havana on 27 May, that sense of optimism disappeared to be replaced by fear, then dread.

Granston was up on deck with his father and dozens of other families, their suitcases packed and ready to disembark, when the Cuban officials, all smiles, first came aboard.

It quickly became clear that the ship was not going to dock and that no-one was being allowed off. He kept hearing the words “manana, manana” – tomorrow, tomorrow. When the Cubans left and the ship’s captain announced that people would have to wait, he could feel, even as a little boy, that something was wrong.

For the next seven days, Captain Schroder tried in vain to persuade the Cuban authorities to allow them in. In fact, the Cubans had already decided to revoke all but a handful of the visas – probably out of fear of being inundated with more refugees fleeing Europe.

The captain then steered the St Louis towards the Florida coast, but the US authorities also refused it the right to dock, despite direct appeals to President Franklin Roosevelt. Granston thinks he too was worried about the potential flood of migrants.

By early June, Captain Schroder had no option but to turn the giant liner back towards Europe. “The joy had gone out of everything,” Feldman recalls. “No-one was talking about what would happen now.”

As the ship headed back across the Atlantic, six-year-old Granston kept asking his father whether they were going back to see their grandparents. His father just shook his head in silent despair.

By then, people were openly crying as they wandered the ship – one passenger even slit his wrists and threw himself overboard out of sheer desperation. “If I close my eyes, I can still hear his shrieks and see the blood,” Granston says quietly.

In the end, the ship’s passengers did not have to go back to Nazi Germany. Instead, Belgium, France, Holland and the UK agreed to take the refugees. The American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee (JDC) posted a cash guarantee of $500,000 – or $8 million (£4.7m) in today’s money – as part of an agreement to cover any associated costs.

On 17 June, the liner docked at the Belgian port of Antwerp, more than a month after it had set sail from Hamburg. Feldman, her mother and sisters all went on to England, as did Granston and his father.

They both survived the war but between them they lost scores of relatives in the Holocaust, including Feldman’s father who never managed to get out of Poland.

Two-hundred-and-fifty-four other passengers from the St Louis were not so fortunate and were killed as the Nazis swept across Western Europe.

End quote

 

June 12, 2017

Holocaust survivor is comparing Trump’s mass deportation to the arrests of Jewish people by the Nazis

Filed under: Germany, Trump, Uncategorized — Tags: , , , — furtherglory @ 5:01 pm

The following quote is from a news article which you can read at http://www.dailykos.com/story/2017/6/12/1671099/–It-s-tearing-families-apart-Watch-Holocaust-survivor-s-testimony-condemning-ICE-arrests

Screen_Shot_2017-06-12_at_10.46.31_AM.png

Holocaust survivor testifies

Begin quote from news article:

A Holocaust survivor and U.S. military veteran testified against anti-immigrant bills pending in the Michigan House of Representatives, describing a childhood lived in constant fear and comparing Trump’s mass deportation force to the arrests of Jewish people by the Nazis.

Civil rights advocate, Rene Lichtman, 79, noted his testimony fell on the anniversary of the tragic 1939 voyage of the SS St. Louis. Due to anti-Jewish hostility, the ship—carrying nearly 1,000 Jewish refugees—was turned away from Canada, Cuba, and the U.S. While a handful were able to disembark in Cuba, the rest were forced to return to Europe and an untold number died in the Holocaust.

At times holding up old black and white photos of family members, Lichtman warned legislators—and the rest of us—that he now sees “a lot of parallels” in the Trump era.

End quote

In spite of the fact that his son-in-law Jared Kushner is Jewish, Trump does not seem to have much sympathy for the Jews.

June 10, 2017

Trump’s proposed cuts to America’s Holocaust Museum

Filed under: Germany, Uncategorized — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 10:38 am

You can read about Trump’s proposed cuts to our nation’s Holocaust Museum in Washington, DC in two recent newspaper articles:

http://www.cnn.com/2017/06/09/politics/trump-holocaust-memorial-museum-budget-cut/index.html

http://nypost.com/2017/06/09/lawmakers-are-furious-over-trumps-proposed-cuts-to-holocaust-museum/

Perhaps the most angry article is from the Jerusalem Post; you can read the article in the link below:

http://www.jpost.com/Diaspora/Trump-cuts-3M-from-Holocaust-museum-faces-bipartisan-backlash-496397

But today I feel like quoting from my own scrapbookpages.com web site.

My photo of the “eternal flame” which is dedicated to the Jews in the Holocaust Museum

My photo of the entrance to our nation’s Holocaust Museum in Washington, DC

The “Hall of Witness” at the entrance into the Museum

Here is the story on the Washington Museum, on which Trump wants to cut funding, taken from my web site:

https://www.scrapbookpages.com/USHMM/Intro.html

Begin quote from scrapbookpages.com:

Sixty years after Hitler’s reign of terror began in 1933, the long awaited US Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, DC, was dedicated by President William Jefferson Clinton on April 22nd, 1993.

The date commemorated the 50ieth anniversary of the month-long battle in Poland’s Warsaw ghetto uprising, between the Nazis and the Jewish resistance fighters. Ironically, on the opening day of our national museum, which memorializes the genocide of the European Jews, another genocidal religious war was taking place in Europe between the Bosnians and the Serbs.

The Holocaust museum building, shown in my photo above, which incorporates symbolic design features that are intended to be evocative of the Holocaust, was done in a modern architectural style, which Hitler would have called “degenerate.”

Museum exhibit shows the “eternal flame” dedicated to the Jews

The USHMM was not designed to be a dull, boring documentation of historical fact, but rather it is intended to be an intensely personal experience in which the building itself is part of the exhibit. Nothing is spared to convey the horror of the Nazi tyranny and the annihilation of the Jews in Europe.

For visitors, who know little or nothing about the Holocaust, this is a gut-wrenching experience which could cause nightmares; it is not recommended for children under 11 years of age. However, a special exhibit in the museum, called Daniel’s Story, which is based on a book of fiction, is designed to introduce children as young as 6 to the Holocaust.

Located at 100 Raoul Wallenberg Place in Washington, DC, the Holocaust museum is open from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. every day except Christmas Day and Yom Kippur, the Jewish religious holiday which falls on a different day each year, usually in the month of September.

Every day, time-stamped tickets to the permanent exhibit are given out free; the line for tickets starts forming around 7:30 in the morning. However, no ticket is necessary for the special exhibits, Daniel’s Story, and other parts of the museum, including the Wexler Learning Center where visitors can use touch-screen computers to learn about the Holocaust.

At the beginning of 1933, according to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, there were 9 million Jews in all of Europe, including 568,417 in Germany, approximately 250,000 in Austria and 3,028,837 in Poland. On January 30, 1933, after he had received 38% of the popular vote in the three-way 1932 German presidential election, Adolf Hitler was appointed Chancellor of Germany by newly-reelected President Paul von Hindenburg. Two months later, Franklin D. Roosevelt was sworn in as the president of the United States.

In 1933, both America and Germany were in the throes of the Great Depression, caused by the stock market crash in 1929, but Germany was worse off because of its defeat in the first World War and the devastating terms of the Treaty of Versailles which Germany was forced to sign. Hitler blamed the loss of the war and all of Germany’s subsequent economic, social and political problems on the Jews.

Hitler’s grandiose plans included the systematic extermination of all the Jews in Europe, and after that, he wanted to establish a museum in Prague where visitors would be able to see artifacts related to the vanished Jewish culture. A valuable torah scroll from the Pinkus Synagogue in Prague, which Hitler was planning to display in his museum of Jewish history, is now one of the exhibits at America’s national Holocaust Memorial Museum.

Hitler’s first priority was to unite all the ethnic Germans in Europe under one government and one leader, himself. (“Ein Folk, Ein Reich, Ein Führer”) There would be no place for Jews or Gypsies in Hitler’s new Germany; only the Volkdeutsch (ethnic Germans) would be citizens.

Hitler planned to take back German land given to Poland after World War I, as well as the provinces of Alsace and Lorraine and other territory lost as a result of Germany’s defeat in World War I.

Hitler’s new Germany would be called Gross Deutschland (Greater Germany). Historians would call Hitler’s regime “the Third Reich.” The first Reich was the Holy Roman Empire of the German nation and the second Reich was the unification of the German states in 1871.

The capital of Gross Deutschland was to be Germania, which was Hitler’s new name for the city of Berlin. Hitler and his state architect, Albert Speer, began designing magnificent new state buildings in the classic style of Greek and Roman architecture, but none of these buildings were ever built. Hitler envisioned that his nationalist empire, which he called the Thousand Year Reich, would defeat the Communists, and after the demise of the Communists, Germany would be the dominant country in a Jew-free Europe.

Twelve years later, at the end of the World War II, both Hitler and Roosevelt were dead, along with 6 million Jews, which was two-thirds of the total number of Jews in Europe in 1933. Berlin had been reduced to a pile of rubble and Washington, DC was now the undisputed capital of the free world. Hitler’s Third Reich will be remembered for a thousand years, but as the empire which tried to destroy the Jews and failed, not as the glorious empire that Hitler had envisioned.

In the aftermath of World War II, Germany was divided into two new countries and Austria became independent again. Germany lost more territory and the ethnic Germans were scattered more than ever before.

Soon after the defeat of Germany and its Fascist allies, the eastern half of Germany and all of Eastern Europe came under the control of our allies and Germany’s arch enemies, the Communists. In order to hold back the threat of Communism to America, West Germany was made our new ally in 1948 and the Cold War against our former ally, the Communist Soviet Union, became the prime source of anxiety for Americans. During this period, Americans were mainly concerned with building bomb shelters in their back yards, in preparation for the anticipated nuclear war; they had no interest in learning about the destruction of European Jewry in the last war. The word Holocaust was not yet in general use.

Although Palestine was still a British protectorate after World War II, survivors of the Holocaust emigrated there by the thousands. By 1948, the population of Jews in Palestine had reached 600,000 and the new Jewish state of Israel was created. Many Holocaust survivors had emigrated to the United States after World War II, and by 1990, there were 5,981,000 Jews in this country, more than in any other country of the world, including Israel.

For most events in history, memory fades as time passes, but for the Holocaust, it is just the opposite, as American Jews strive to bring the Holocaust to the attention of the public by building museums all across the country. At the year 2000, there were 59 Holocaust museums in America, and more were in the planning stage. Every major American city, including Los Angeles, New York, Houston, and St. Petersburg, has its own Holocaust museum. By 2000, seven states in America had passed laws requiring students to study the Holocaust in public schools.

In 1978, the subject of the Holocaust became popular among Americans when a television mini-series, entitled Holocaust, was seen by 120 million people in this country. A few weeks later, the announcement was made that a national Holocaust memorial was being planned in Washington, DC.

A few heartless anti-Semites have complained that a Holocaust Memorial Museum, built in the shadow of the Washington Monument, is not appropriate for our nation’s Capitol, arguing that the Holocaust didn’t happen in America; it was not Americans that died in the Holocaust and that Americans were not the perpetrators of the Holocaust in which 6 million European Jews were killed. America has no Museum for the Japanese Americans and German Americans who were put into internment camps during World War II, in violation of the American Constitution. Nor does America have a Museum for the Native Americans killed when Europeans settled in this country. There is not even a Museum in honor of the American soldiers who fought in World War II. So why does America have a Holocaust Museum? The answer is that the Holocaust was the most important event in world history.

End quote from my Scrapbookpages,com web site.

May 27, 2017

Kushner’s luxury underground condo?

Filed under: Food, Trump, Uncategorized — Tags: , — furtherglory @ 1:04 pm
screen_shot_20170129_at_12.35.03_pm

Kushner’s Grandmother Rae complaining about her accommodations in her Luxury underground condo.

Kushner’s grandfather and grandmother actually lived in a luxury underground condo, located within the huge Bielski  bunker complex, with more than 1000 other Jews.  Nowadays, it is refereed to as a “hole in the ground”. You can read a little bit more about the luxury bunker complex by following the link below.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bielski_partisans

Begin quote from Wikipedia

The partisans lived in underground dugouts (zemlyankas) or bunkers. In addition, several utility structures were built: a kitchen, a mill, a bakery, a bathhouse, a medical clinic for the sick and wounded and a quarantine hut for those who suffered from infectious diseases such as typhus. Herds of cows supplied milk. Artisans made goods and carried out repairs, providing the combatants with logistical support that later served the Soviet partisan units in the vicinity as well. More than 125 workers toiled in the workshops, which became famous among partisans far beyond the Bielski base. Tailors patched up old clothing and stitched together new garments; shoemakers fixed old and made new footwear; leather-workers laboured on belts, bridles and saddles. A metalworking shop established by Shmuel Oppenheim repaired damaged weapons and constructed new ones from spare parts. A tannery, constructed to produce the hide for cobblers and leather workers, became a de facto synagogue because several tanners were devout Hasidic Jews. Carpenters, hat-makers, barbers and watchmakers served their own community and guests. The camp’s many children attended class in the dugout set up as a school. The camp even had its own jail and court of law.

Some accounts note the inequality between well-off partisans and poor inhabitants of the camp.

End quote from Wikipedia

I wonder if the Kushners were among the well-off partisans.

In addition, the partisans stole food from local starving villagers, according to the next quote from Wikipedia.  They subjected local villagers to violence and murder, though some of the villagers willingly gave up their food rather than being murdered.  This is explained in the same Wikipedia article cited above.

Begin quote from Wikipedia

Like other partisan groups in the area, the Bielski group would raid nearby villages and forcibly seize food; on occasion, peasants who refused to share their food with the partisans were the subject of violence and even murder. This caused hostility towards the partisans from peasants in the villages, though some would willingly help the Jewish partisans.

End quote from Wikipedia

Slate article about Kurshner’s holocaust experience

The following is a quote from the news article in the link above.

Begin quote

…miraculously, Kushner, her father, and her sister did [Escape the Ghetto]—and were eventually rescued by the legendary Jewish partisan Tuvia Bielski. For a year, they lived in the forest with Bielski’s brigade of more than 1,000 Jews until, in the spring of 1944, “he brought us out from the woods.” Novogrudok had been liberated by the Soviets.

End quote from Slate.

Rae Kushner.

Fat faced Rae Kushner was a cook in the Bielski luxury bunker complex, and might have prepared food stolen from local peasants murdered by the partisans.

https://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10008263

The following is a quote about Kushner on the US holocaust museum web site.

Begin quote

Shortly thereafter [escaping from the ghetto], the Bielski partisans took in the escapees from Novogrodek—including Rae and her family. In the Naliboki encampment where the Bielskis had managed to shelter over 1,200 people, Rae regularly stood guard and often cooked the camp meals—mostly potatoes, soup, and small pieces of bread.

While in the partisans, Rae reconnected with Joseph Kushner, whom she knew prior to the war. They married a year after the Bielski camp was liberated by the Russian army in July 1944.

End quote

So it turns out that the Kushners had it relatively easy in their bunker complex.  They had whole bunkers filled with underground dairy cows.  Probably much easier than the poor local villagers whom they sometimes murdered and and from whom they stole food.

The FBI may soon be coming after Kushner  — maybe he should dig himself a new “hole in the ground” and hide in it.

May 23, 2017

Trump’s 2nd trip to Yad Vashem — as he tries to make amends

Filed under: Holocaust, Trump, Uncategorized — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 3:46 pm
U.S. President Donald Trump rekindles the eternal flame during a ceremony commemorating the six million Jews killed by the Nazis in the Holocaust, in the Hall of Remembrance at Yad Vashem Holocaust memorial in Jerusalem May 23, 2017.  REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Donald Trump wears a yam-aka at Yad Vashem in Jerusalem on his second trip to honor the Jews

I previously wrote about Trump’s first trip to Yad Vashem, where he stayed for only 15 minutes. Vad Vashem is a vast place which takes at least 2 days to see.  The Jews were affronted by Trump’s insulting attitude toward the Jews — staying only 15 minutes in such a sacred place. What is WRONG with him?

The following is a quote from a recent news article which you can read in full by clicking on the link below:

http://mobile.reuters.com/article/worldNews/idUSKBN18J1JJ

Begin quote from the news article:

U.S. President Donald Trump paid tribute at Israel’s Yad Vashem memorial on Tuesday to the six million Jews killed in the Nazi Holocaust, calling it an indescribable act of evil.

Holding hands, the president and First Lady Melania Trump walked solemnly to lay a wreath together upon the ashes of Holocaust victims, buried at the site’s Hall of Remembrance.

“Words can never describe the bottomless depths of that evil, or the scope of the anguish and destruction. It was history’s darkest hour,” Trump said in a short speech after the memorial ceremony.

“It was the most savage crime against God and his children,” said Trump, who is visiting Israel and the Palestinian Territories on the second leg of his first foreign trip since taking office in January.

U.S. President Donald Trump and first lady Melania lay a wreath during a ceremony commemorating the six million Jews killed by the Nazis in the Holocaust, in the Hall of Remembrance at Yad Vashem Holocaust memorial in Jerusalem May 23, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Mrs. Donald Trump lays wreath.

Trump’s administration has drawn anger over past omissions and utterances regarding the Holocaust.

In January, on International Holocaust Remembrance Day, a Trump administration statement failed to mention Jews, the overwhelming majority of those who were killed in the Holocaust.

In April, White House spokesman Sean Spicer triggered an uproar when he said Hitler did not sink to the level of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad by using chemical weapons on his own people. Spicer also used the term “Holocaust centers”, in an apparent reference to the Nazi death camps.

Spicer later apologized after his comments sparked an uproar on social media and elsewhere for overlooking the fact that millions of Jews perished in Nazi gas chambers.

The Anti-Defamation League said in April that anti-Semitic incidents, from bomb threats and cemetery desecrations [sic] to assaults and bullying, have surged in the United States since the election of Trump, and a “heightened political atmosphere” played a role in the rise.

Trump had been criticized for waiting until late February to deliver his first public condemnation of anti-Semitic incidents, previously speaking more generally about his hope of making the nation less “divided.”

He later called such incidents “horrible … and a very sad reminder” of the work needed to root out hate, prejudice and evil.

Trump was due to travel to Rome later on Tuesday, where he will continue a nine-day trip that began in Saudi Arabia.

 

End quote from news article

April 26, 2017

Trump pledges his support of the Jews

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 5:51 pm

The following quote is from this news article: http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2017/04/26/trump-denounces-dangerous-anti-semitism-in-holocaust-remembrance-day-remarks.html

Begin quote

In his strongest remarks to date repudiating anti-Semitism and denouncing Holocaust deniers, President Trump on Tuesday marked Holocaust Remembrance Day by pledging – with survivors of the Nazi-led genocide looking on – that the United States would “always stand with the Jewish people.”

Trump spoke at a ceremony [today] hosted by the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum [in Washington, DC] to mark the unveiling of a new conservation and research center. The center will serve as a repository for a vast collection of artifacts by those who survived Adolf Hitler’s massacre of Jews during World War II.

Members of Congress and Holocaust survivors — whose strength and courage Trump said was an inspiration — attended the emotional event in the Rotunda, the center of the Capitol. Survivors lit candles at the end of the ceremony.

Trump said Holocaust denial is one form of “dangerous anti-Semitism that continues all around the world” and that can be seen on university campuses, in attacks on Jewish communities “or when aggressors threaten Israel with total and complete destruction.”

“This is my pledge to you: We will confront anti-Semitism,” he said. “We will stamp out prejudice, we will condemn hatred, we will bear witness and we will act. As president of the United States, I will always stand with the Jewish people and I will always stand with our great friend and partner, the state of Israel.”

End quote

Trump did not use the word Nazi in his speech, since he does not know how to pronounce this word.

April 15, 2017

The Lithuanian Jews are back in the news

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust, Uncategorized — Tags: , — furtherglory @ 11:52 am

You can read about the Lithuanian Jews in this news story:

http://www.timesofisrael.com/science-helped-verify-this-unbelievable-holocaust-escape-story/

The following quote is from the news article:

Begin quote

“Holocaust Escape Tunnel,” a “Nova” production to be shown April 19, sheds new light on the attempt by 80 imprisoned men and women — mostly Lithuanian Jews — to make a break for freedom in the face of Nazi bullets. The show documents the application of scientific methods to verify what would otherwise be a nearly unbelievable story.

The documentary is set in and around Vilna, the Yiddish and Hebrew designation for Vilnius, the capital of Lithuania. At its peak, before World War II and the Holocaust, the city boasted a Jewish population of some 77,000, had 105 synagogues, the largest Jewish library in the world and six daily Jewish newspapers.

End quote

I have written about the Lithuanian Jews several times on these blog posts:

https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/tag/lithuanian-jews/

Unfortunately, many people do not believe the story of the Lithuanian Jews. I do not believe it either.

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