Scrapbookpages Blog

December 23, 2016

Could Herschel Grynszpan still be alive?

Filed under: Dachau, Germany, Uncategorized, World War II — Tags: , , , — furtherglory @ 10:44 am
Herschel Grynspan

Photo on news article shows Herschel Grynszpan, then and now

On this news article, you can read about the possibility that Herschel Grynszpan is still alive: http://www.haaretz.com/world-news/europe/.premium-1.759957

In 1938, there was a night of violence in Germany, that came to be known as  Kristallnacht. This was the night that German citizens smashed windows in Jewish shops and set fire to over 200 Jewish Synagogues throughout Germany, Austria and the Sudetenland in what is now the Czech Republic. Ninety-one people were killed during this uncontrolled riot which the police did not try to stop.

That night, Hitler and his henchmen were gathered at the Bürgerbräukeller, a beer hall in Munich, celebrating the anniversary of Hitler’s attempt to take over the German government by force in 1923; Hitler’s failed Putsch had been organized at the Bürgerbräukeller.

Joseph Goebbels made a speech, at the beer hall, in which he said that he would not be surprised if the German people were so outraged by the assassination of German diplomat Ernst vom Rath, by a Polish Jew named Herschel Grynszpan, that they would take the law into their own lands and attack Jewish businesses and Synagogues. Goebbels is generally credited with being the instigator of the pogrom. (Pogrom is a Polish word which means an event in which ordinary citizens use violence to drive the Jews out.)

In spite of the Jewish “holy war” against the Nazis, there were no Jews sent to any of the concentration camps solely because they were Jewish, during the first five and a half years that the Nazi concentration camps were in existence. Jews were sent to the Dachau concentration camp, from day one, but it was because they were Communists or trade union leaders, not because they were Jewish.

The first Jews, to be taken into “protective custody” in Germany, simply because they were Jewish, were arrested during the pogrom on the night of November 9th & 10th in 1938, which the Nazis named Kristallnacht (Night of Broken Glass).

Kristallnacht was the night that German citizens smashed windows in Jewish shops and set fire to over 200 Jewish Synagogues throughout Germany, Austria and the Sudetenland in what is now the Czech Republic. Ninety-one people were killed during this uncontrolled riot which the police did not try to stop.

That night, Hitler and his henchmen were gathered at the Bürgerbräukeller, a beer hall in Munich, celebrating the anniversary of Hitler’s attempt to take over the German government by force in 1923; Hitler’s failed Putsch had been organized at the Bürgerbräukeller.

Joseph Goebbels made a speech, at the beer hall, in which he said that he would not be surprised if the German people were so outraged by the assassination of German diplomat Ernst vom Rath, by a Polish Jew named Herschel Grynszpan, that they would take the law into their own lands and attack Jewish businesses and Synagogues. Goebbels is generally credited with being the instigator of the pogrom. (Pogrom is a Polish word which means an event in which ordinary citizens use violence to drive the Jews out.)

Approximately 30,00 Jewish men were arrested during the pogrom, allegedly for their own protection, and taken to the 3 major concentration camps in Germany, including 10,911 who were brought to Dachau and held as prisoners while they were pressured to sign over their property and leave the country.

The majority of these Jews were released within a few weeks, after they had promised to leave Germany within six months; most of them wound up in Shanghai, the only place that did not require a visa, because other countries, except Great Britain, refused to take them.

In anticipation of such violence against the Jews by the Nazis, President Franklin D. Roosevelt had invited 32 countries to a Conference in Evian, France in July 1938 to discuss the problem of Jewish refugees.

The only country which agreed to allow Jewish refugees, as immigrants. was the Dominican Republic; 5,000 German Jews emigrated to the Dominican Republic before the start of World War II.

The American Congress refused to change the US immigration laws, passed in 1920 and 1921, to allow a higher quota of Jewish refugees from Germany to enter, although America did start filling the quota under the existing laws for the first time. The poor Jews — no country wanted them!

 

December 17, 2016

Why are so many people comparing Donald Trump to Adolf Hitler?

Filed under: Trump, Uncategorized — Tags: , , , — furtherglory @ 8:27 am

You can read a recent news article, which compares Trump to Hitler, at http://www.dnaindia.com/world/report-horrors-of-the-holocaust-2283664

The following quote is from the news article:

Begin quote

The recent controversy in the USA over the selection of President-elect Donald Trump by Time Magazine as its ‘Person of the Year’ has seen critics drawing comparisons with a similar selection in the past featuring Nazi leader Adolf Hitler as the Man of the Year in 1938. Though one would not wish to get entangled in the current political debate, one recalls another controversial figure chosen by Time on the cover of its weekly in October 1943, Heinrich Himmler described by the cover as ‘the Police Chief of Nazi Europe’ with a chilling quote, ‘The dead do not speak’.

End quote

The Time magazine cover shows a photo of the person who has had the most impact on the news in the previous year. Sometimes, the person of the year is a woman. The most famous example of this was when a woman, who had had her nose cut off, was chosen as the person of the year.

The news article continues with this quote:

Begin quote

Heinrich Himmler was the chief architect of a sinister program designed by the Nazis (members of ‘Nationalsozialistishe Deutsche Arbeiterpartei’ ‘National Socialist German Worker’s Party’) to wipe out the entire Jewish population of Europe through planned detention of Jews in Nazi concentration camps where after initial torture and starvation, they were killed by ingeniously evil methods of mass extermination. The entire operation was later termed as ‘The Holocaust’ (Greek Holokauston referring to the sacrifice of an animal by fire) in the 1950s while the Jews used the Hebrew word, ‘Ha Shoah’ meaning ‘The Catastrophe’ to describe one of the world’s biggest and most systematic pogroms aimed at cleansing Europe of Jews and other minorities. The Holocaust which was termed as the ‘Final Solution (for the Jewish Problem)’ by the Nazis ended in the death of 60 lakh Jews including 11 lakh children. It sought to draw legitimacy from a popular but warped theory of population control called ‘Eugenics’ (Greek ~ Eu – well genos ~ born) which called for the promotion of breeding between people of ‘desired genetic traits’ (read ‘White Aryans’) with the limitation of breeding between people with ‘undesirable genetic traits’ (read Jews and other ethno-religious minorities) through sterilisation. Eugenics for the Nazis became the ‘social philosophy’ for creation of an ideal race of Aryans with the elimination of the ‘lesser races’ through mass murders approved by Hitler and executed by Himmler and his associates.

The Nazis began the prosecution [persecution] of Jews as soon as they assumed power in 1933 with a call for the boycott of Jewish businesses with posters in German pronouncing ‘Die Juden sind unser Unglück’ meaning ‘The Jews are our bad luck’; thus encouraging state-sponsored hate crimes against the community. The Nazis stepped up the persecution by bringing in the ‘Nuremberg Laws’ which barred Jews from holding public offices and mixing with other Germans. The Nuremberg Laws became a precedent for further anti-Jew legislation and anti-Semitic policies in the coming years. Unsurprisingly, violent activities against Jews began and culminated into what has been termed as the ‘Kristallnacht’ or ‘The Night of the broken glass’.

End quote

Is there any valid comparison between Trump and Hitler? I don’t think so. Hitler is famous for killing Jews. Trump loves Jews. His daughter has converted to the Jewish religion and she is married to a Jew. They will both be participating in Trump’s term as president.

Trump was born rich; Hitler was a self-made man, who was born poor.

November 10, 2016

78th anniversary of Kristallnacht

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 9:06 am

Kristallnacht was the name given to a riot that took place in Germany 78 years ago on November 9th and 10th.

You can read about this event on this news article: http://www.scmp.com/news/hong-kong/article/2044815/has-world-forgotten-terrible-lesson-kristallnacht

Kristallnacht was the Nazi pogrom against the Jews which started on the night of November 9, 1938.

This was a state-sanctioned riot in which the windows of all the Jewish stores in every city in Germany and Austria were smashed. Police stood by to prevent looting, but merchandise was thrown into the street and destroyed.

Every synagogue in Germany was set on fire; the fire department extinguished the fires only if other nearby buildings were threatened.

A total of 91 people lost their lives.

This travesty took place after a three-day death watch over Ernst vom Rath, a diplomat at the German embassy in Paris who was shot by Herschel Grynzspan, a 17-year old Polish Jew.

Herschel had fled to Paris when the Nazis announced in October 1938 that all Polish Jews in Germany would be deported back to Poland. The Polish government had already torn up their passports when they evicted them earlier. The Poles would not allow them back into their country. It seems that no country wanted the Jews.

Grynzspan’s parents and sister were forced to live in a refugee camp on the border; his motive for killing vom Rath was to call the attention of the world to the plight of the stateless Jews, that no country wanted.

I blogged about this last year at https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2015/10/30/77th-anniversary-of-kristallnacht-the-night-of-broken-glass/

 

May 28, 2016

Holocaust survivor Hedy Epstein has died, at the age of 91

Filed under: Dachau, Germany, Holocaust, World War II — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 4:10 pm

You can read a newspaper report on the death of Hedy Epstein at http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/29/us/hedy-epstein-rights-activist-and-holocaust-survivor-dies-at-91.html?_r=0

Hedy Epstein is shown in the center of the photo

A protest in Cairo in 2009. Hedy Epstein, center, spent much of her life working for a broad range of social justice movements. Credit Amr Nabil/Associated Press

It was only a year ago that I was blogging about Hedy Epstein: https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2014/08/24/hedy-epstein-the-jewish-woman-who-was-arrested-in-st-louis-confronted-herman-goering-at-nuremberg/

The following quote is from the recent news story:

Begin quote

Ms. Epstein, a Holocaust survivor who spoke widely about the persecution of the Jews in Germany, and who spent most of her adult life working for a broad range of social justice movements, died on Thursday at her home in St. Louis. She was 91.

The cause was cancer, said Dianne Lee, a friend.

Ms. Epstein was born Hedwig Wachenheimer on Aug. 15, 1924, in Freiburg, Germany, and raised in nearby Kippenheim. Her father, Hugo, ran a dry-goods company founded by his grandfather. Her mother, the former Ella Eichel, was a homemaker.

After the Kristallnacht pogrom, Hedy was expelled from school. She returned home to see her house ransacked and her father being dragged away by the police. He spent four weeks in Dachau. After being released, he and his wife arranged for Hedy, their only child, to travel to England in 1939 on a Kindertransport train and ship.

“I was a terrible child,” Ms. Epstein told The St. Louis Post-Dispatch in 2000. “I resisted going away and accused my parents of having found me on the doorstep, left by Gypsies, and now wanting to get rid of me. I recognized later that they were giving me life.”

She was an interview subject in the Academy Award-winning 2000 documentary “Into the Arms of Strangers: Stories of the Kindertransport.”

[…]

Hedy was raised by foster parents in London and left school at 16 to work in a munitions plant. In 1945, she returned to Germany, where she was a translator and researcher with the Allied War Crimes Tribunal at the Nuremberg “Doctors Trial.”

She immigrated to the United States in 1948 and began working for the New York Association for New Americans, an agency that brought Holocaust survivors to the United States. Two years later, feeling restless, she moved to St. Paul, a city she picked at random, where she worked on behalf of refugees.

End quote

It is a mystery to me why the Nazis sent children to England to be saved. Didn’t they realize that these children would spend the rest of their lives demonizing the German people, and participating in war crimes trials against Germans. That’s the thanks they got for saving a few Jewish children, by sending them to England.

The following quote is from the end of the news article:

Begin quote

Her 1999 memoir, written in German and published in Germany, was titled “Erinnern Ist Nicht Genug” (“Remembering Is Not Enough”).

Ms. Epstein often addressed audiences at schools and community events about the Holocaust. Her talks concluded with an admonition: “Remember the past, don’t hate, don’t be a bystander.”

End quote

Sorry, but I have no respect for Hedy Epstein, who spent her whole adult life encouraging people to hate the German people.

November 21, 2015

What is the true story of Kristallnacht?

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 1:20 pm
Jews from Baden-Baden who were sent to Dachau after Kristallnacht

Jews from Baden-Baden who were sent to Dachau after Kristallnacht

You can read the Jewish version of the Kristallnacht story at http://www.history.com/topics/kristallnacht

This is my non-Jewish version of the Kristallnacht story:

On the night of November 9th and 10th, known as “Kristallnacht, the windows in all of the Jewish stores were smashed and merchandise was thrown into the street. All of the Synagogues were burned. The name given by the Nazis to this destruction was Kristallnacht or Night of Broken Glass.

In November 1938, there were 10,911 Jews brought to Dachau, after they were taken into “protective custody” during Kristallnacht. Another 20,000 Jews were sent to either the Sachsenhausen camp or to the Buchenwald camp after Kristallnacht.

Most of the Jews arrested after Kristallnacht were released within a few weeks after they promised to make arrangements to leave Germany.

Around 8,000 of the 30,000 Jews, who were taken into “protective custody,” were allowed to enter Great Britain without a visa and thousands more went to Shanghai, where no visa was required.

Altogether, more than 50,000 German Jews found safety in Britain before World War II started, including 10,000 Jewish children, who were sent on Kindertransports.

Walter Loeb, a German Jew, was arrested in Karlsruhe on Nov. 10, 1938 during Kristallnacht; he was 22 years old. According to a news article, he spent a year in the Dachau concentration camp before being released in 1939. He arrived in the United States in 1940, and later served in the U.S. Army

According to a news article by Noah Rosenberg, 19-year-old Werner Kleeman arrived at Dachau concentration camp on November 20, 1938, following his arrest during the Kristallnacht pogrom. In October 2009, almost 71 years later, Kleeman returned to Dachau for the first time. But, on this occasion, he was escorted to the gate by a friend and welcomed by the Dachau museum’s director, Gabriele Hammermann, who had cordially extended an invitation to Kleeman to visit and speak as a “memorial witness.”

In his article, Noah Rosenberg wrote that on Kleeman’s prior visit to Dachau, Kleeman said that he had “Nothing to eat, no clothes to wear, nothing to do but stand on the parade ground 12 to 16 hours a day in cold weather” and worry, as people were “dying all day long.”

Kleeman was released after spend 30 days at Dachau and came to America, courtesy of a distant Midwestern relative. On his return visit to Dachau, Kleeman spoke of his induction into the American Army, which sent him back to war-torn Europe, where he played a hand in Germany’s defeat, ultimately arresting the German officer who had thrown him into Dachau.

Rachel Zimbler’s father, an Austrian Jew in Vienna, who was arrested the day after Kristallnacht, managed to get out of Dachau after only 48 hours. A month later, on Dec. 10, her father put Rachel and her brother on a “kinder transport” which took the children to Holland.

A few of the Jews arrested after Kristallnacht remained in Dachau for as long as 3 years before they were released, as late as 1941, on the condition that they leave Germany immediately, according to Theodor Haas, a Dachau survivor who was among the Jews taken into “protective custody” on November 9, 1938.

 

I neglected to write about the anniversary of Kristallnacht this year

Filed under: Germany — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 7:53 am

Today I read a news article about Kristallnacht here: http://www.algemeiner.com/2015/11/20/the-sounds-of-broken-glass-reflections-on-kristallnacht-and-israel/#

The photo shown below accompanies the news article

Photo taken in the aftermath of Kristallnacht

Damage done on Kristallnacht

November 9th is a very important date in history, which is commemorated each year by the Jews.  I have written several blog posts about Kristallnacht which you can read here: https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/tag/kristallnacht/

Strangely, the press never tells you about the reason why the Nazis perpetrated Kristallnacht.

I explained the reason for Kristallnacht in this previous blog post:  https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2014/10/07/the-famous-jewish-boycott-of-german-goods-in-march-1933/

This quote is from the news article:

On Wednesday, Nov. 9, 1938, the Nazi SS paramilitary forces, aided by German civilians, unleashed a pogrom against the Jews of Berlin, Vienna, Prague, and cities across the heart of Europe. They dragged Torah scrolls through the streets; torched more than 1,000 synagogues; vandalized Jewish homes, businesses and cemeteries; and murdered nearly 100 Jews.

As fires raged and glass was shattered, local firefighters, policemen, and neighbors stood by and did nothing. During those two nights, as many as 30,000 Jewish men were arrested and deported to concentration camps. Those who were left were forced to wear a yellow star with the word “Jude” — Jew — sewn onto their clothing.

This pogrom specifically, and the Holocaust in general, could not have taken place without the preparation of hearts and minds of these people to tolerate the cruelty against their neighbors. Kristallnacht symbolized then, and now, how anti-Jewish legislation and antisemitic rhetoric lead to violence. It reminds us that the Holocaust began not with gas chambers, but with words. This lesson has important implications today.

What occurred on those nights in November was about more than broken glass. It was a warning. The rise of Nazi Germany had ushered in a new dark era of inhumanity and barbarity. The day after Kristallnacht, The New York Times declared, “No man can look on the scenes witnessed yesterday without shame for the degradation of his species.” Time magazine proclaimed, “The civilized world stands revolted by a bloody pogrom against a defenseless people.” And yet, the rest of the world did heartbreakingly little to stop what was already unfolding for European Jewry.

I did a search on Kristallnacht to make sure that I remembered the story correctly.  I found this at http://www.history.com/topics/kristallnacht

On November 9 to November 10, 1938, in an incident known as “Kristallnacht”, Nazis in Germany torched synagogues, vandalized Jewish homes, schools and businesses and killed close to 100 Jews. In the aftermath of Kristallnacht, also called the “Night of Broken Glass,” some 30,000 Jewish men were arrested and sent to Nazi concentration camps. German Jews had been subjected to repressive policies since 1933, when Nazi Party leader Adolf Hitler (1889-1945) became chancellor of Germany. However, prior to Kristallnacht, these Nazi policies had been primarily nonviolent. After Kristallnacht, conditions for German Jews grew increasingly worse. During World War II (1939-45), Hitler and the Nazis implemented their so-called “Final Solution” to the what they referred to as the “Jewish problem,” and carried out the systematic murder of some 6 million European Jews in what came to be known as the Holocaust.

Bad Nazis! They turned on the Jews for no reason and the result was the Holocaust.  Once again — read why the Nazis turned on the Jews:  https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2014/10/07/the-famous-jewish-boycott-of-german-goods-in-march-1933/

This quote is from the news article:

Remembering Kristallnacht means understanding that the demonization of a people leads to the dehumanization of a people, and finally, to the destruction of a people. Remembering Kristallnacht means ensuring that, in the face of evil against fellow human beings, it is never acceptable for silence to be an option, indifference a strategy, or “never again” a mere slogan.

Finally, remembering Kristallnacht means deciding whether we will be remembered by our descendants as protectors of peace and human rights, or as bystanders to the most grievous crimes against our humanity. We must all ask ourselves whether we are doing enough to raise our voices and take action against the increasing violence around the world that is fueled by hatred.

When will the Jews learn that treating the goyim like scum has consequences?

October 30, 2015

77th anniversary of Kristallnacht – the night of broken glass

In the past, I have written several blog posts with the tag Kristallnacht: https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/tag/kristallnacht/

This morning, I read a news article which mentions Kristallnacht:

http://www.connectionnewspapers.com/news/2015/oct/29/first-hand-lesson-holocaust-fairfax/

The following quote is from the news article, cited above:

Begin quote:

On the seventy-seventh anniversary of when supposedly civilized nations lost their collective minds, we are here to learn the lesson – first hand – of what can happen when people just stand by and do nothing.” That was how George Mason University President Dr. Angel Cabrera described the Expressions of the Holocaust event, organized by Mason Hillel, the school’s Jewish life organization, at which he was a guest speaker on Sunday, Oct. 25 [2015].

As he greeted the assembly of thirty Holocaust survivors, families, friends, Hillel members, students and community guests, Cabrera was referring to the upcoming anniversary of Kristallnacht (The Night of Broken Glass), the night in 1938 when mob violence (later aided by Nazi Storm Troopers, members of the SS and Hitler Youth) broke out across Germany, Austria and other Nazi controlled areas. By morning, untold numbers of Jews were beaten or murdered. Jewish homes and businesses were looted or destroyed. Hundreds of synagogues were vandalized or burnt to the ground, and some 30,000 Jewish men were arrested to be later sent to concentration camps. Many historians view Kristallnacht as the public ignition point of the Nazis’ determination to rid the Jewish presence from anywhere within their sphere of control and influence.
Groups like Mason Hillel are determined that the lessons of the past are not lost. “This is our third program dedicated to Holocaust education and remembrance,” said Taylor Kreinces, chair of the event. “We will hear memories of our honored guests to better understand their lessons of the Holocaust…to share their experiences and wisdom for future generations.” Kreinces asked participants to take a memory from the event and share it, hoping that they, too, will share. “It’s the only way to ‘never forget.’”

End quote

A group of people stand outside a Jewish-owned shop in an unnamed German town in November 1938, after the Kristallnacht, when Nazis thugs burned and plundered hundreds of Jewish homes, shops and synagogues across the country. November 9th is regarded a historic faithful day in Germany as on the same day in 1918 monarchy in Germany was overthrown, in 1939 it heralded the Holocaust and in 1989 it marked the fall of the Berlin Wall which resulted in the German reunification after 28 years of division. (AP Photos)

A group of people stand outside a Jewish-owned shop in an unnamed German town in November 1938, after the Kristallnacht, when Nazis thugs burned and plundered hundreds of Jewish homes, shops and synagogues across the country. November 9th is regarded a historic faithful day in Germany as on the same day in 1918 monarchy in Germany was overthrown, in 1939 it heralded the Holocaust and in 1989 it marked the fall of the Berlin Wall which resulted in the German reunification after 28 years of division. (AP Photos)

I have blogged about Kristallnacht on several blog posts.

The following quote is from a previous blog post at https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2014/10/07/the-famous-jewish-boycott-of-german-goods-in-march-1933/

Begin quote:

When I visited the US Holocaust Museum in Washington, DC, I saw photographs of the German boycott of Jewish stores on April 1, 1933. The caption on one of the photos mentioned that “there was talk of an American boycott of German goods” but didn’t say whether this boycott had actually happened.

An American boycott of German goods had been declared by Rabbi Stephen Wise on March 23, 1933, the same day that the German Congress voted to give Hitler dictatorial powers under the Enabling Act. The German one-day boycott was supposedly intended to stop the news stories of Nazi atrocities which were being printed in Jewish newspapers.

Every Holocaust survivor, who is out on the lecture circuit today, speaking to 5th graders in America, begins his or her talk by telling these gullible young children about how wonderful it was in Germany before that evil monster Hitler came along, and for no reason at all, started Holocausting the innocent Jews, who had never done anything wrong in the entire history of the world.  Oh, the humanity!

I was born in 1933, and when I first heard about the International boycott of German goods, I almost kicked the slats out of my crib. I assumed that every one in the world knew about the International boycott, but apparently I was wrong.

End quote

German man sweeping up broken glass after Kristallnacht

German man sweeping up broken glass after Kristallnacht

The Fasanenstrasse Synagogue in Berlin after it was set on fire by a Nazi mob during the 'Kristallnacht' riots, 9th-11th November 1938. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

The Fasanenstrasse Synagogue in Berlin after it was set on fire by a Nazi mob during the ‘Kristallnacht’ riots, 9th-11th November 1938. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

June 13, 2015

Why did the Nazis send 10,000 Jewish children to England just before they began the killing of 6 million Jews?

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , — furtherglory @ 9:09 am
Memorial to the children on  the Kindertransport

Memorial to the children on the Kindertransports

Some of the Jewish children who were sent to England, just before the Holocaust began, are now out on the lecture circuit telling their stories. Today, I read the story of one of these children here.

This quote is from the news article, cited above:

Begin quote:

Anne L. Fox was just 12 years old when she stood at the train station in Berlin awaiting the arrival of the Kindertransport that would take her to London — far away from the hatred, the unthinkable acts of the Nazis — and the only home she had ever known.

That day, Dec. 28, 1938, remains seared into her memory. With a small suitcase in hand, Fox held tight to her parents, Marta and Eugene Lehmann. In the wake of Kristallnacht — the name given to the night of anti-Semitic atrocities committed six weeks earlier — they registered her for this life-saving mission sponsored by the British government. Her best friend, a gentile girl named Dorit, was also there to say goodbye.

End quote

This quote, about the Kindertransport is from Wikipedia:

The Kindertransport (German for children transport) is a rescue mission that took place during the nine months prior to the outbreak of the Second World War. The United Kingdom took in nearly 10,000 predominantly Jewish children from Germany, Austria, Czechoslovakia, Poland, and the Free City of Danzig. The children were placed in British foster homes, hostels, schools and farms. Often they were the only members of their families who survived the Holocaust.[1]

Let me see if I have this straight?  The Nazis had a plan to exterminate all the Jews, preferably in gas chambers, but first they wanted to save 10,000 children who would live to grow up and have children and grandchildren, who would then make trips, 70 years later, to see the gas chambers and condemn the German people until the end of time.

I have written about the tours, made by students from Great Britain, several times on my blog:

https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2012/11/19/british-het-tours-start-in-oswiecim-then-its-on-to-auschwitz/

https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2014/08/16/british-students-on-het-trip-learn-how-to-emote-at-auschwitz/

https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2013/12/06/british-students-on-het-tour-of-auschwitz-learn-about-the-block-of-death/

November 6, 2013

“notorious anti-British Jewish activist” will speak at the 75th commemoration of Kristallnacht at the Jewish Museum in Berlin

November 9th will mark the 75th anniversary of Kristallnacht, aka the “Night of Broken Glass” when Jewish businesses, homes and Synagogues were destroyed throughout Nazi Germany.  Jewish men were arrested and sent to concentration camps, while their families tried to find a country to which Jews could emigrate.

Jewish men were arrested after Kristallnacht and sent to Dachau and other camps

Jewish men were arrested after Kristallnacht and sent to Dachau and other camps

On November 8, 2013, in commemoration of this historic event, Brian Klug, a notorious anti-Israel British Jewish activist, will speak at the Jewish Museum in Berlin. Klug, who denies there is a new anti-Semitism, will speak on the topic “What do we mean when we say ‘antisemitism’?”

This quote is from a news article which you can read in full here:

At its Kristallnacht commemoration on Friday evening, Nov. 8, the Jewish Museum Berlin – which many consider to be Europe’s leading Jewish museum – will feature as its keynote speaker Brian Klug, a notorious anti-Israel British Jewish activist. Klug, who denies there is a new anti-Semitism, will speak on the topic “What do we mean when we say ‘antisemitism’?”

Chancellor Angela Merkel

Chancellor Angela Merkel

In response, Shimon Samuels wrote the following open letter to German’s Chancellor Angela Merkel. Samuels is director for International Relations of the Simon Wiesenthal Center. He has served as deputy director of the Leonard Davis Institute for International Relations at Hebrew University of Jerusalem, European director of the Anti-Defamation League, and Israel Director of the American Jewish Committee. He was born in the UK and studied in UK, Israel, U.S. and Japan.

Madam Federal Chancellor, we are about to mark the 75th anniversary of the Kristallnacht Reichspogrom – the Night of Broken Glass State Pogrom – which is considered the prelude to the Nazi Holocaust.

The photo below shows the Jewish Museum in Berlin, where Brian Klug will speak.

Jewish Museum in Berlin

Jewish Museum in Berlin

This quote is from the news article:

Madam Chancellor, the Berlin Jewish Museum has been architecturally described as “a warped Star of David” due to its zigzag structure. The museum’s management is indeed warping the Jewish Star. One of its display halls is called “The Void,” which holds the Israeli artist Kadishman’s stamped metallic faces, dramatically redolent of the gas chambers. That vacuum is becoming pervaded by the noxious fumes of a new Jew-hatred.

The photos below show “The Void” in the Jewish Museum.  The faces are supposed to be “redolent of the gas chamber.”  Who knew?

The "Memory Void" tower in the Jewish Museum

The “Memory Void” tower in the Jewish Museum

The "Fallen Leaves" in the Memory Void Tower

The “Fallen Leaves” in the Memory Void Tower in the Jewish Museum

"Faces" in the "Fallen Leaves" in the Memory Void tower

“Faces” in the “Fallen Leaves” in the Memory Void tower

When I visited the Jewish Museum in 2001, the year that it opened, I thought that the “faces” were supposed to represent the faces of the Jews who were killed in the Holocaust.  I didn’t know that the faces were supposed to be “redolent” of the gas chambers.  This just goes to show you how difficult it is for the goyim to understand the minds of Jews.

I hope that Angela Merkel can understand what the Jews are saying.  This quote is from the news article:

Was the Berlin Jewish Museum created, at the cost of Germany’s taxpayers and international donations, to demonize Israel, serve as a fig leaf for antisemitism and to commit memoricide – the murder of the memory of those murdered?

Madam Chancellor, we are deeply aware that the Museum’s actions contravene your personal position and over sixty years of your own and your predecessors’ efforts for German reconciliation with the Jewish people and a commitment to the security of the State of Israel.

Our Centre thus urges your Chancellery to condemn the Museum’s distortion of its role, launch an enquiry into its behavior and suspend public funding until a new management is appointed.

At this point in the story, a little history of the city of Berlin might be helpful.

When Adolf Hitler became the Chancellor of Germany in 1933, there were 585,000 Jews living in Germany. The largest Jewish community was in Berlin, which had 160,000 Jewish residents. Only 7,000 Jews returned to Berlin after the war.

The Jews had been expelled from Berlin in 1573 and had not been allowed back into the city for 100 years. When the Jews were finally allowed back into Berlin, they were never forced to live in a ghetto, although the Eastern European Orthodox Jews lived in the Jewish quarter called the Scheunenviertel, northwest of the Alexanderplatz.

When the separate German states were finally united into a country by Otto von Bismarck in 1871, the German Jews were granted full rights of citizenship, which was unusual for that time when the Russian Jews were still being forced to live on a reservation called the Pale of Settlement. The only other European country with a large population of Jews, in which they had been granted full rights, was Austria.

Bismarck was a friend of the Jews and in 1866, he was present when Berlin’s grand Neue Synagogue was opened at Number 30 Oranienburger Strasse.

The Berlin Synagogue was restored after it was destroyed on Kristallnacht

The Berlin Synagogue was restored after it was destroyed on Kristallnacht

The  Berlin Synagogue, shown in the photo above, was burned during Kristallnacht on November 9, 1938, but the blaze was put out before much damage was done. The Nazis occupied the building in 1940 and desecrated the Synagogue by using it for storage.

The Nazis also destroyed the Jewish cemetery in Berlin.

The Synagogue sustained severe damage by Allied bombs during the war and for years it was left as an empty shell. Restoration began in 1988 and the Synagogue was reopened on May 7, 1995, the 50ieth anniversary of the German surrender in World War II.

Berlin was the residence of Karl Marx, the son and grandson of Jewish rabbis, the man who introduced Communism to the world when he published his Communist Manifesto in 1848. This prompted a revolution in Germany, which failed, and resulted in the emigration of a number of German liberals to America where they became known as the “Forty-Eighters.”  My German relatives were not “48ers.” They came to American in 1852.

Berlin also became the center of the social democratic movement, the worker’s movement and the trade union movement in Germany. Berlin was the headquarters of the Social Democratic Workers Party, founded by Karl Liebknecht and August Bebel.

During World War I, a new militant leftist group, formed by Jewish leaders, Karl Liebknecht and Rosa Luxemburg, agitated for the overthrow of the Kaiser and the end of the war. The war effort was hampered when 300,000 workers went on strike in January 1918. In November 1918, there was a naval mutiny and a strike of the dock workers.

Finally, on November 9, 1918, Philipp Scheidemann, the Jewish leader of the Social Democrats, proclaimed the first German Republic from a window of the Reichstag building in Berlin.

Twenty years later, the Nazis, who always blamed the Jews for Germany’s defeat in World War I, perpetrated the pogrom which became known as Kristallnacht on November 9, 1938. Thirty thousand Jewish men, many of them from Berlin, were rounded up and sent to the concentration camps at Dachau, Sachsenhausen and Buchenwald. They were held for at least two weeks and then released if they promised to leave Germany within six months.

The German Kaiser was forced to abdicate in November 1918 and the German government was taken over by the SPD (Social Democrats). The Jewish leader Friedrich Ebert was subsequently installed as the first president of the new Republic.

The Armistice, which ended World War I, was signed by Matthias Erzberger, a representative of the Ebert government, on November 11, 1918.

The Nazis would later call the Social Democrats “the November criminals” and characterize the signing of the Armistice as a “stab in the back” for the German people. For the next 20 years, a controversy would rage between the liberal left and the right wing Nazis over whether or not the German army had been defeated on the battlefield, a claim which Hitler called the “Big Lie.”

After the Armistice in 1918, Berlin was in total chaos; the city resembled a war zone with revolutionaries fighting in the streets. Before a new democratic constitution could be written, a militant group of leftists, called the Spartacus League, attempted to set up a soviet government, along the lines of the Communist revolution in Russia in October 1917. Their leader, Karl Liebknecht, proclaimed another Republic from the balcony of the imperial palace in Berlin.  After World War II ended, the Soviets tore down the palace, but preserved the section where the hero Liebknecht had proclaimed the Communist Republic.

The Spartacus League renamed itself the German Communist Party (KPD) and called for a general strike of the workers in January 1919.  A volunteer group of 3,000 former soldiers, called the Freicorps, was called in to restore order. They fought against the Red Front (Communist) soldiers in hand to hand combat on the streets of Berlin.

The leaders of the Communists, Liebknecht and Luxemburg, were dragged from their hiding place and murdered in the Tiergarten park in the center of Berlin. Luxemburg’s body was thrown into the Landwehr Canal. A monument to Rosa Luxemburg now stands in the Tiergarten.

Many of the Nazi leaders, including Reinhard Heydrich and Heinrich Himmler, came from the soldiers, who fought with the Freicorps to put down the Communist Revolution, and the soldiers who fought in World War I, including Adolf Hitler who had been a lance corporal in the German Army. Their memories of the street fighting and the paralyzing workers’ strikes was the source of their later persecution of the Communists, Social Democrats and trade unionists after the Nazis gained power in January 1933.

At the beginning of August 1945, three months after the German surrender, which ended World War II, American President Harry Truman was on his way to Potsdam, a suburb of Berlin, for a conference with Allied leaders Churchill and Stalin, when he took a victory lap around Berlin in an Army Jeep to see the devastation wrought by the Allied bombing.

There was not much left of Berlin to see. The capital city of Germany had been bombed 24 times between November 18, 1943 and March 1944, and sporadic hits continued until the city was captured by the Russian army in April, 1945. By that time, the city had been reduced to 98 million cubic yards of rubble.

Mounds of rubble in Berlin were covered over

Mounds of rubble in Berlin were covered over

Each of the bomb attacks on Berlin involved over 1,000 planes and the dropping of up to 2,000 tons of bombs. Half of the city’s bridges were destroyed and the underground railway tunnels were flooded. There was no gas, electricity or water in the central portion of the city. The pre-war population of 4.3 million had been reduced to 2.8 million, as people were forced to flee the city; some 1.5 million people became homeless when their homes were bombed.

One out of 7, of the buildings destroyed in Germany by the Allied bombing, were in Berlin. Out of a total of 245,000 buildings in Berlin, 50,000 had been completely destroyed and 23,000 had been severely damaged; 80,000 residents of the city had been killed. Even the trees in the Tiergarten, a large park in the center of the city, had been killed in the Battle of Berlin. There were so many historic buildings destroyed that Berliners jokingly referred to the American and British air raids as Baedecker Bombing. Baedecker travel guide books were used by tourists to locate famous and historic buildings.

Is there a Museum in Berlin in honor of the suffering of the goyim in World War II?  No, of course not!  It would be offensive to the Jews to say anything about how non-Jews suffered in World War II, not to mention that this would amount to “Holocaust distortion.”

Three years ago, I wrote another November blog post, which you can read here.

December 16, 2011

What was it really like in Dachau? Ask the Jews!

Filed under: Dachau, Germany, Holocaust — Tags: , , , , — furtherglory @ 8:35 am

A regular reader of this blog, who has his own blog here, recently wrote in a comment that “Dachau was THE HILTON of KZ Camps.”  Not according to the Jews who were sent to Dachau on November 10, 1938, following the pogrom known as Kristallnacht. (Pogrom is a Polish word which means an event in which ordinary citizens use violence to drive the Jews out.)

Photo on display in Dachau Museum was taken in 1936

This quote is from David Solmitz, the son of Walter Solmitz, who has written a book about his father.  You can read the full story here:

Solmitz said when his father was arrested Nov. 10, 1938, in Munich, he correctly predicted that things would get worse.

Walter Solmitz detailed that he and the 200 others in his barracks were awakened day after day at 4:45 a.m. to face hours of degradation, threats, chores, roll calls and marching. Many collapsed and suffered from frostbite. Punishment, he wrote, consisted of isolation in darkness, being hung upside down from a tree for several hours and being struck with a cane.

Walter Solmitz believed that six men in his barracks died during his six-week imprisonment. Walter Solmitz was released Dec. 21, 1938.

Walter and his wife, Elly, who was instrumental in freeing her husband, made their way to the United States and eventually to Brunswick.

Elly Solmitz was “instrumental in freeing her husband” because she arranged for the family to leave Germany. Approximately 30,00 Jewish men were arrested on the night of November 9, 1938, allegedly for their own protection, and taken to the 3 major concentration camps in Germany, including 10,911 who were brought to Dachau and held as prisoners. The majority of these Jews were released within a few weeks, after they promised to leave Germany within six months; most of them wound up in Shanghai, the only place that did not require a visa, because other countries, except Great Britain, refused to take them.

Kristallnacht was the night that German citizens smashed windows in Jewish shops and set fire to over 200 Jewish Synagogues throughout Germany, Austria and the Sudetenland in what is now the Czech Republic. Ninety-one people were killed during this uncontrolled riot which the police did not try to stop. That night, Hitler and his henchmen were gathered at the Bürgerbräukeller, a beer hall in Munich, celebrating the anniversary of Hitler’s attempt to take over the German government by force in 1923; Hitler’s failed Putsch had been organized at the Bürgerbräukeller.

Joseph Goebbels made a speech that night at the beer hall in which he said that he would not be surprised if the German people were so outraged by the assassination of German diplomat Ernst vom Rath by a Polish Jew named Herschel Grynszpan that they would take the law into their own lands and attack Jewish businesses and Synagogues. Goebbels is generally credited with being the instigator of the Kristallnacht pogrom.

In anticipation of such violence against the Jews by the Nazis, President Franklin D. Roosevelt had invited 32 countries to a Conference in Evian, France in July 1938 to discuss the problem of Jewish refugees. The only country which agreed to allow Jewish refugees as immigrants was the Dominican Republic; 5,000 German Jews emigrated to the Dominican Republic before the start of World War II. The American Congress refused to change the US immigration laws, passed in 1920 and 1921, to allow a higher quota of Jewish refugees from Germany to enter, although America did start filling the quota under the existing laws for the first time. The American immigration laws were finally changed in 1948 after the Jewish homeland of Israel became a reality.

According to information given at the Dachau Memorial site, some of the first Jews to be murdered at Dachau were Ernst Goldmann, Arthur Kahn, Erwin Kahn, Karl Lehrburger and Wilhelm Aron. Herbert Hunglinge committed suicide to escape the unbearable conditions in the camp.

The first Commandant of Dachau, Hilmar Wäckerle, was charged with murder for the deaths of Louis Schloss on May 16, 1933 and Dr. Alfred Strauss on May 24, 1933. Wäckerle was never put on trial, but he was dismissed from his position as Commandant and transferred to another camp.

On August 7, 1933, Felix Fechenbach, another Jewish prisoner at Dachau, died in the camp after being punished. He was a newspaper editor from Detmold.

After Wäckerle was dismissed because of his cruel punishment of the prisoners, the new Commandant, Theodor Eicke, issued a new set of rules for the camp in October 1933. The SS guards and administrators were forbidden to strike the prisoners or to punish them on their own authority. Punishment for such offenses as stealing or sabotage had to be approved by headquarters, which was at first located in Dachau, but was later moved to Oranienburg near Berlin.

According to Martin Gilbert, author of a book entitled “Holocaust”:

“News of individual Jewish deaths in Dachau continued to reach the West. On October 10 (1933) Dr. Theo Katz who had worked in the camp hospital was killed. Also in October, Dr. Albert Rosenfelder, a Jewish lawyer, disappeared while in his cell, and was never heard from again.”

According to information in a display in the bunker at the Dachau Memorial Site, Dr. Albert Rosenfelder was among the first people to be arrested by the Nazis in March 1933; he was sent to Dachau on April 13, 1933.

Dr. Rosenfelder was well known because of his involvement in a criminal court case in which the defendant, a non-Jew named Huszmann, was accused of a murder in which the motive was said to be “unnatural lust.” The murder victim was 20-year-old Helmuth Daube whose body was found in front of his home in Gladbeck, Germany in March 1928. His throat had been cut and his genitals were missing; there were wounds on both hands, and a stab wound in the abdomen, although no blood was found near the body. Huszmann was acquitted and subsequently Julius Streicher, the notorious editor of an anti-Semitic newspaper called “Der Sturmer,” made the outrageous statement that Daube’s death had been a “ritual murder” committed by Jews.

The Dachau bunker exhibit says that Dr. Rosenfelder was responsible for Streicher being sent to prison in 1929. Streicher had been convicted of “libeling the Jewish religion under Paragraph 166 of the Weimar Penal Code” and his newspaper was banned for a time. No one knows if Dr. Rosenfelder’s disappearance was the result of a revenge murder or if he escaped, or was secretly released and allowed to leave Germany.

According to an unnamed former Jewish prisoner, who had been sent to Dachau on February 4, 1938, the Jews received far worse treatment than the other prisoners in the camp. Martin Gilbert quoted from an account published in Paris in 1939, which was written by this unnamed prisoner after he was released from Dachau:

The Jewish prisoners worked in special detachments and received the hardest tasks. They were beaten at every opportunity – for instance, if the space between the barrows with which they had to walk or even run over loose flints was not correctly kept. They were overwhelmed with abusive epithets such as “Sow Jew”, “Filth Jew” and “Stink Jew”. During the working period, the non-Jewish prisoners were issued with one piece of bread at breakfast – the Jews with nothing. But the Jews were always paraded with the others to see the bread ration issued. […] When, during great heat, it was allowed to fetch water for the working detachments, it sometimes happened that the Jews were forbidden to drink.

In spite of this, the Nazis continued to release Jewish prisoners from Dachau, even though the Jews would then tell the world about the atrocities committed in the camp. According to Martin Gilbert, author of “Holocaust,” there were 15,000 Jews from Austria sent to Dachau and Buchenwald in June 1938, following the Anschluss of Germany and Austria. One of the Jews, who was in Dachau during this period and was later released, reported that “In June (1938) a Jew was brought here under suspicion of ‘race pollution’. He was so ill that we had to wheel him into camp on a wheelbarrow, and to wheel him to morning and evening roll-call, as the doctor would not put him on the sick list. In a week he was dead.”

Around 8,000 of the 30,000 Jews, who were taken into “protective custody” on Kristallnacht were allowed to enter Great Britain without a visa and thousands more went to Shanghai, where no visa was required. Altogether, more than 50,000 German Jews found safety in Britain before World War II started, including 10,000 Jewish children, who were sent on Kindertransports, according to Martin Gilbert.  

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