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January 22, 2015

Soldiers in the First Army of the Ukrainian Front liberated Auschwitz on Jan. 27, 1945

Soldiers who participated in the liberation of Auschwitz

Soldiers who participated in the liberation of Auschwitz

The young woman in the center of the photo above is a Communist political prisoner named Olga. This is a still shot from the Soviet movie, which is shown to tourists at the Auschwitz Museum in the main camp. Note the badge worn by the elderly woman, which indicates that she is a political prisoner, aka an illegal combatant.

The liberation of Auschwitz on January 27, 1945 was the most important event that ever happened in the entire history of the world, so it is important to correctly identify the liberators.

A  recent news article, which you can read in full here, claims that it was Ukrainians, not Russians, who liberated Auschwitz.  The photo above was taken in February 1945 because the liberating soldiers did not have cameras with them.  The liberation had to be re-enacted.

Here is the real story of the liberation of Auschwitz:

On January 18, 1945, the three Auschwitz camps, called Auschwitz I, II and III, and the 40 satellite camps had been abandoned by the German Nazis. The prisoners, who chose to leave with the Germans, were marched out of the camp.

The gassing of the Jews at Auschwitz II, also known as Birkenau, had stopped at the end of October 1944. The evacuation of the Birkenau survivors to other concentration camps in the West had already begun in early October.

Anne Frank and her sister Margo were on one of the first transports out of Auschwitz, which took them to Bergen-Belsen, where they both died of typhus.

Aerial photos taken by the Allies showed that the roofs of crematoria buildings Krema II and Krema III and Krema IV at Birkenau had been removed in November 1944, so that the cremation ovens could be lifted out with cranes and transported to Germany.

Unfortunately, the four gas chambers in the Birkenau camp had not been destroyed by the Germans at the same time that the cremation ovens were lifted out of these building.

Photo of the ruins of a gas chamber, allegely found by the Soviet liberators in January 1945

 Ruins, allegedly found by the Soviets on Jan. 27, 1945, were photographed in Feb. 1945

My photo of the ruins of Krema II

My photo of the ruins of Krema II at Birkenau taken in 2005

Many people believe that Soviet soldiers really arrived shortly after the Germans left with some the prisoners on the “death march” out of the camp, and that the crematory buildings (Krema II, Krema III, and Krema IV) were actually destroyed by the Soviet soldiers before they officially liberated the camp.

Fortunately, Krema I in the main camp had been converted into a bomb shelter by the Germans, and it was not destroyed by the liberators.  The bomb shelter was later converted into a gas chamber, which is still shown to tourists.

For many years, it was claimed that the so-called gas chamber in the main camp was original, but now it is admitted that it is a “reconstruction.”

Re-enactment of child survivors marching out of Auschwitz-Birkeau

Re-enactment of child survivors marching out of Auschwitz-Birkeau

Another still photo from the movie taken at the re-enactment of the liberation of Auschwitz

Another still photo from the movie taken at the re-enactment of the liberation of Auschwitz

Note the little girl on the far left in the front row in the first photo above. She is on the left in the front row of the second photo above, which is also a still shot taken from the documentary film made by the Soviet Union in February, after they had liberated the camp.

The first photo shows a few of the 611 children at Birkenau, who greeted the liberators. They are holding out their arms to show their tattoos. Notice that the boy in the front is wearing a prison uniform which looks as though it would fit an adult.

This same film clip is included in a film entitled “The Nazis: Nazi War Crimes,” produced by the Soviet Union in which it was claimed that this same film clip was shot by the Nazis just before these children were killed at Babi Yar, a ravine near Kiev in the Ukraine.

Photo of the ruins of one of the Birkenau gas chambers was taken by the Soviets in 1945

Photo of the ruins of one of the Birkenau gas chambers was taken by the Soviets in Feb. 1945

So now that we know that the Soviets were not above telling lies about Babi Yar, I am inclined to believe that it was the Soviets who blew up the gas chambers at Birkenau before their official “liberation” of the camp on January 27, 1945.

The photo above shows the ruins of one of the gas chambers. How did the Soviets know that the ruins, shown in the photo, are the ruins of a gas chamber?

Why were there so many child survivors of Auschwitz, which are shown in the Soviet film of the re-enactment of the liberation?  Apparently, the Soviet soldiers did not know that children under the age of 15 were gassed at Auschwitz.  There were 611 children still alive when the Soviet liberators arrived.

July 18, 2014

the father of Assemblywoman Cheryl R. Brown helped to liberate Auschwitz

Filed under: California, Holocaust — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 9:53 am
Say what? Shocked kid listens to Obama speech in 2009

Say what? Shocked kid listens to Obama speech in 2009

The following quote is from a news article, which you can read in full here.  The title of the article is California School’s Holocaust Denial Assignment Requires ‘Reeducating’ of Misled Youth.

Assemblywoman Cheryl R. Brown (D-San Bernardino) revealed that her own father had served during WWII and had helped to liberate the Aushwitz (sic) concentration camp in Poland. He had told her about the smell of burned bodies as a child, writes the Times. “As a result of this assignment, we must now deal with reeducating young people who have been misled by this district,” Brown told the school board.

Cheryl Brown, whose father helped to liberate Aushwitz

Cheryl R. Brown, whose father helped to liberate Aushwitz in Poland

Yes Virginia, there is a Santa Claus.  And black soldiers in the U.S. Army liberated Aushwitz.  This was not the Auschwitz “death camp” but a different camp, in Poland, called Aushwitz. (Note the difference in the spelling of the names of these two camps.)

This quote is also from the article:

One frustrated Pasadena-based attorney Neal Fialkow, who was also present at the board meeting, said the damage may already be done, notes the Times. Addressing the school board, he said “You’ve planted a seed of doubt… Congratulations. You’ve taken a[n] historical fact and made it a matter of opinion. What’s next, 9/11 never happened?” he posited. “Every single child now has been infected.”

What a revolting development this is!  “Every single child [in the Rialto school district] has now been infected.  Is there any hope for these children?

I blogged about the liberation of Auschwitz on this blog post: https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2013/01/26/january-27-2013-is-international-holocaust-remembrance-day/

 

January 26, 2013

January 27, 2013 is International Holocaust Remembrance Day

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 10:00 am

January 27, 2013 is the 68th anniversary of the official liberation of the three Auschwitz camps by the Soviet Union on January 27, 1945.  The German SS men, who ran the camp, had left on January 18, 1945, taking 60,000 prisoners with them on a “death march” out of the camp.

You can read all about Holocaust Remembrance Day here on a website, which includes a video about the Auschwitz Album, a book of photos that gives “visual evidence” of the mass murder at Auschwitz.

Still shot from a movie taken by the Soviets after Auschwitz was liberated

Still shot from a movie taken by the Soviets after Auschwitz was liberated

I previously blogged about International Holocaust Remembrance Day here and here.

Artwork at the entrance to the Auschwitz Museum

Artwork at the entrance to the Auschwitz Museum

The photo above was taken by me in 2005. The green arrow in the photo points to the exit door from the Auschwitz administration building.  The next thing that visitors see is the iconic sign “Arbeit Macht Frei” over the entrance to the Auschwitz I main camp.

Two tourists entering the Auschwitz main camp in 1998

Two tourists entering the Auschwitz main camp in 1998

Last year, a new record was set for the number of visitors to Auschwitz: over 1.4 million people visited the camp.  In 1998, when I first visited the Auschwitz complex, there were only a few visitors to the main camp. No one, besides me and my tour guide, was there when I toured the Auschwitz II (Birkenau) camp in 1998.  (Raul Hilberg wrote a three-volume set of books entitled The Destruction of the European Jews after touring only the main Auschwitz camp for half a day; he did not visit the Birkenau camp where the Jews were gassed.)

Recent photo of visitors leaving the Auschwitz main camp

Recent photo of visitors leaving the Auschwitz main camp which is now a Museum

Children marching out of the Auschwitz-Birkenau camp after they were liberated on Jan. 27, 1945

Children marching out of the Auschwitz-Birkenau camp after they were liberated by the Soviet Union on Jan. 27, 1945

The ruins of Krema III, one of the four gas chamber buildings at Auschwitz-Birkenau, are shown in the photo below.

Ruins of Krema III gas chamber building

Ruins of Krema III gas chamber building which was blown up on Jan. 20, 1945

There were 611 children in the Birkenau camp who stayed behind when the camp was evacuated on January 18, 1945. There were 4,428 women and girls and 169 boys who stayed behind when the Auschwitz-Birkenau complex was evacuated. Around 2,000 prisoners were left behind in the men’s camp at Birkenau; there were around 1250 men in the main camp who did not join the march out of the camp and 850 men, including famous survivor Primo Levi, who chose to stay behind at Monowitz.

According to Holocaust historian Danuta Czech, the evacuation of the three camps began in the early morning hours of January 18, 1945 when 500 women with children were escorted out of the Birkenau camp by SS guards. They reached Wodzislaw on January 21st. The men arrived the next day and all men, women and children were loaded onto open railroad cars and taken to Germany.

The prisoners at the Auschwitz III camp (Monowitz), and all the prisoners in the Auschwitz sub-camps, marched to the four concentration camps at Gleiwitz near the German border, arriving on January 21st. They were then taken on trains to the Buchenwald, Dachau, Sachsenhausen or Mauthausen camps in the Greater German Reich.

Old women who stayed behind when Auschwitz was evacuated

Women who stayed behind when Auschwitz was evacuated on Jan. 18, 1945

Jews waiting for the gas chamber at Auschwitz-Birkenau

Photo from Auschwitz Album shows Jews waiting for the gas chamber at Auschwitz-Birkenau

The Hungarian Jews, shown in the photo above, are looking toward the Sauna building, where there was a shower room.  Behind them are the clothing warehouse buildings, known as “Canada.” There were no showers for them; this photo is “visual evidence” that these Jews are waiting for the gas chamber in Krema IV (not shown), which is behind them, and to the left in the photo. Krema IV was blown up by the prisoners.

Child survivors leaving the barracks at Birkenau after the camp was liberated

Child survivors leaving the barracks at Birkenau after the camp was liberated

Each of the survivors in the photo above has a story to tell about how they beat the odds and were not chosen by Dr. Death (Dr. Josef Mengele) for the gas chamber.