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June 29, 2016

Viktor Frankl’s book will be made into a movie

Filed under: Holocaust, movies — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 10:30 am
Viktor Frankl

Viktor Frankl

Viktor Frankl was a famous Holocaust survivor; he wrote a best selling memoir entitled Man’s Search for Meaning.

You can read a news article about him at https://www.algemeiner.com/2016/06/28/viktor-frankls-best-selling-holocaust-memoir-mans-search-for-meaning-to-be-made-into-movie/

The following quote is from the news article:

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Born in Vienna in 1905, Frankl was an inmate in four concentration camps between 1942 and 1945, while his parents, brother and pregnant wife were all killed. His memoir, which was published in 1946 and written in nine days, is based on his suffering and that of the patients he subsequently treated. By the time of his death in 1997, Man’s Search for Meaning had sold more than 10 million copies in 24 languages.

In the book, Frankl argues that “we cannot avoid suffering but we can choose how to cope with it, find meaning in it, and move forward.” It revealed his method, called “logotherapy,” based on finding meaning in life.

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I previously blogged about Victor Frankl at https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2012/09/26/the-story-of-viktor-frankl-a-famous-holocaust-survivor/

The following quote is from my previous blog post, cited above:

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But to get back to Viktor Frankl, here is the short version of his experience in the Nazi camps:  He was first sent to the Theresienstadt Ghetto, which was the camp for the prominent Jews.  From there, he was sent to Auschwitz-Birkenau.  Holocaust experts will tell you that the only reason that Jews were sent, from Theresienstadt to Auschwitz, was to kill them.  But after only three or four days at Auschwitz-Birkenau, he was sent to the Dachau main camp.  From there, he was sent to the Kaufering III sub-camp where he worked as a doctor, treating prisoners who had typhus.

Frankl was not registered at Auschwitz-Birkenau, which according to the Holocaust experts, means that he was gassed.  Then he was sent to the Dachau main camp, where he was again not registered before being sent on to the Kaufering III sub-camp.

According to Wikipedia: “In March 1945, he was offered to be moved to the so called rest-camp Türkheim, also affiliated with Dachau. He decided to go to Türkheim, where he worked as a doctor until 27 April 1945, when Frankl was liberated by the Americans.”

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My personal opinion is that Viktor Frankl was never in any camp. I believe that he made up his Holocaust story, but what do I know? Who am I, a lowly goyim, not even human?

 

June 9, 2015

New movie about Viktor Frankl is being planned

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , — furtherglory @ 9:53 am
ATTENTION NICK RICHMOND - SPCL GUARDIAN Recent file picture of Austrian physiologist Viktor Frankl  who died 02 September at the age of 92. ==SPCL GUARDIAN==

Austrian physiologist Viktor Frankl

The photo above is shown along with an article about Viktor Frankl, which you can read in full here.

According to the news article, cited above, a new movie about Viktor Frankl is being planned.

The article starts off with this quote:

Man’s Search for Meaning, Viktor Frankl’s account of his attempts to rationalise the Holocaust, has been optioned for a film adaptation, according to Deadline.

Frankl, a contemporary of Freud, lost his whole family during the Nazi’s attempted extermination of the Jews. He developed his theory of “healing through meaning”, known as logotherapy, while a prisoner in the Auschwitz and Kaufering concentration camps. He counselled his fellow prisoners, many of whom were suicidal, with a philosophy that argued that striving for meaning, not pleasure nor power, is what keeps us alive.

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Frankl was in one of the Kaufering sub-camps of Dachau.

Several years ago, I wrote about Viktor Frankl on this blog post: https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2012/09/26/the-story-of-viktor-frankl-a-famous-holocaust-survivor/

Viktor Frankl is famous for making a mountain out of a mole hill. His life story promotes Holocaust denial. He was treated very well in the camps.