Scrapbookpages Blog

January 4, 2017

Triumpf of the Will

Filed under: Germany, movies, Uncategorized — Tags: , , , — furtherglory @ 2:57 pm

The movie Triumph of the Will was mentioned in the TV news. I wrote about this famous movie on my website at http://www.scrapbookpages.com/Nurnberg/Nurnberg04A.html

You can watch the famous movie on you-tube.

Quote from my website:

Begin quote
The Nazi party rallies in Nürnberg, Germany were designed to impress the rest of the world with Germany’s military might and the party’s solid support of Hitler. To people who were alive before World War II started, the name Nürnberg immediately evokes images of the spectacular Nazi rallies.

The speeches were broadcast around the world by radio, and films of the event were shown in the newsreels that preceded movies in theaters, the 1930ies substitute for television world news.

In 1935, Hitler commissioned the beautiful and talented movie actress, Leni Riefenstahl, to produce the film “Triumph des Willens (Triumph of the Will), which is still frequently shown on the History Channel on cable television; it is a propaganda documentary of the 1935 annual party rally at the Zeppelin Field.

In 1934, Albert Speer was commissioned to design a permanent stone structure for the party rallies at the Zeppelin Field. According to Speer, his design was “a mighty flight of stairs topped and enclosed by a long colonnade, flanked on both ends by stone abutments. Undoubtedly it was influenced by the Pergamum altar.” He added that “The structure had a length of thirteen hundred feet and a height of eighty feet. It was almost twice the length of the Baths of Caracalla in Rome.”

December 1, 2013

College students in Pennsylvania don’t know the Nuremberg laws from a hole in the ground…

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust — Tags: , , , , — furtherglory @ 11:57 am

A recent news story in an online newspaper in Philadelphia has this headline:

Nuremberg? Forget it. They don’t even know Hitler.

The city of Nuremberg was Hitler's favorite city in Germany

The city of Nuremberg was Hitler’s favorite city in Germany

This quote is from the news article:

When Rhonda Fink-Whitman decided to test college students’ knowledge of the Holocaust, lugging a video camera to four local campuses, she discovered some amazing facts:

Adolf Hitler was the leader of Amsterdam. Josef Mengele was an author. And JFK led the Allies during World War II, assisted by an American Army general named Winston Churchill.

Hardly any students had heard of the Holocaust, the Nazis’ systematic murder of six million Jews. And when her questions turned to the Night of Broken Glass, the Nuremberg Trials, or the meaning of the phrase the Final Solution, forget it.

Why is it that college students in Philadelphia don’t know the first thing about the Holocaust? Because only 5 states in the United States of America MANDATE Holocaust education, and Pennsylvania is not one of those states.

Rhonda Fink-Whitman, the author of a novel, entitled 94 Maidens, wants to change all that.  She has made a video of her interviews with Philadelphia students. Her video shows that the students are completely uneducated about the Holocaust and World War II, except for the students, who transferred from states like New Jersey, which is one of the 5 states that mandate Holocaust education.

Why should college students in America be concerned with what happened in Europe 70 years ago?  Because it could happen here.  Half of the survivors of the Holocaust are living in America.  These students don’t know the meaning of the word “genocide.”  The Jews in America could be genocided again, unless today’s students in Philadelphia learn the meaning of the term “by-stander,” which they also don’t know.

You can watch the YouTube video, entitled “94 Maidens The Mandate Video,” below:

So what were the Nuremberg laws, which are mentioned in the video?

The term “Nuremberg Laws” means the laws, pertaining to the Jews, in Hitler’s Germany.  These laws, which were signed by Hermann Göring, were announced at the annual Nazi party rally at Nuremberg in 1935.

However, the term “Nuremberg Laws” could also mean the ex-post-facto laws, passed by the Allies after World War II, which were used in the Nuremberg International Military Tribunal, at which the German war criminals were put on trial in November 1945.

The “1935 Nuremberg Laws” defined who was a Jew, based on heredity, and allowed German citizenship only to the Germans, who did not have Jewish ancestors.

The Nuremberg Laws formed the basis for the plans that were made on January 20, 1942, at the Wannsee Conference, for “The Final Solution of the Jewish Question in Europe.” The Nuremberg Laws were used to determine who would be transported, from Germany and the Nazi occupied countries, to the infamous concentration camps, such as Dachau, Treblinka, and Auschwitz.

Here is a little known fact, that the students should also know: The Nuremberg Laws denied the Jews the right to fly the Nazi flag, but at the same time, protected the right of the Jewish Zionists to fly their own flag, which is now the blue and white flag of Israel.

Why did Hitler allow the Jews to fly the Zionist flag?  Because he wanted the Jews to leave Germany and set up their own country in Palestine.  Read “the Transfer Agreement” to learn more about this.

The city of Nürnberg, which is located in the German state of Bavaria, is famous for its medieval walls and its ancient castle, and also for gingerbread cookies, toy manufacturing, Gothic churches, Nürnberger bratwurst and the Christmas market.

The city of Nuremberg, after the bombed ruins were rebuilt

The city of Nuremberg, after the bombed ruins were rebuilt

Nürnberg dates back to the year 1050 and for around 500 years, it was the unofficial capital of the Holy Roman Empire, sometimes referred to by historians as the First Reich or first German empire.

The National Socialists, aka Nazis, made Nürnberg the unofficial capital of their empire, which was known to Americans as the Third Reich. The Second Reich was the unification of the German states in 1871.  The first Reich was “the Holy Roman Empire of the German nation.”

In January 1945, 90% of the old city of Nürnberg was destroyed when it was bombed by the Allies because of its historic importance to Hitler and the Nazis. The famous Nürnberg Castle and the city wall were damaged in the bombing raid, but have since been restored.

On April 20, 1945 (Hitler’s 56th birthday), the city of Nürnberg was captured by three divisions of the American Seventh Army, after a fierce battle that had lasted for several days.

It was at the Zeppelin Field, just outside the city of Nürnberg, that the National Socialists had staged huge annual party rallies. Each rally would be preceded by a performance of the Wagnerian opera, “Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg,” the story of Hans Sachs, which was Hitler’s favorite opera.

Because of its close association with the Nazi party, the city of Nürnberg was chosen as the site of the International Military Tribunal, the war crimes trial, which started in November 1945 at the Justizgebäude (Palace of Justice).

The building where the Nuremberg IMT took place

The building where the Nuremberg IMT took place (Note the eyelid windows on the roof.)

After the war, Nuremberg was in the American zone of occupation and American troops were stationed in the city until 1992.

A restored church in Nuremberg has "eyelid" windows

A restored Christian church in Nuremberg has “eyelid” windows on the roof

Nuremberg castle in the background and former home of Albrect Durer in the foreground

Nuremberg castle in the background with the former home of the famous German artist, Albrect Dürer, in the foreground

One of the towers at the Nuremberg castle

One of the towers at the Nuremberg castle

November 15, 2010

Nazi party rallies in Nürnberg, 1927 to 1938

Filed under: Germany — Tags: , — furtherglory @ 12:03 pm

The photo above was taken during the August 19-20, 1927 NSDAP (Nazi) party rally in the city of Nürnberg (Nuremberg to Americans).

Georg Halberman and Pfeffer von Salomon stand in the front, wearing Bavarian lederhosen (leather shorts) and knee socks, while Hitler and his right-hand man, Rudolph Hess, who is smiling in the background, salute the parade of Sturmabteilung (SA) troops that are marching by.

In the photo above, Heinrich Himmler stands behind Hitler during the 1938 Nazi party rally.

Himmler was a strong nationalist, even more so than Hitler; he wanted to return to the past and to bring back the ancient German culture. The medieval city of Nürnberg, with its castle dating back to the reign of Kaiser Frederick Barbarossa, was one of Hitler’s favorite cities, because it is rich in German history.

The ancient castle in the city of Nürnberg

It was because of the historical significance of Nürnberg that Hitler selected the city as the site of the annual Nazi Parteitage (Party Day). The first official party rally was held in 1927 in the city itself with speeches given at the Hauptmarkt, the main town square. Before 1927, there had been rallies in Nürnberg on German Day which Hitler and other party members attended.

The Nazi party rallies in Nürnberg were designed to impress the rest of the world with Germany’s military might and the party’s solid support of Hitler. To people who were alive before World War II started, the name Nürnberg immediately evokes images of the spectacular Nazi rallies. The speeches were broadcast around the world by radio, and films of the event were shown in the newsreels that preceded movies in theaters, the 1930ies substitute for television world news. In 1935, Hitler commissioned the beautiful and talented movie actress, Leni Riefenstahl, to produce the film “Triumph des Willens (Triumph of the Will), which is still frequently shown on the History Channel on cable television; it is a propaganda documentary of the 1935 annual party rally at the Zeppelin Field.

Go to YouTube to see a video which shows members of the SA marching toward the Nürnberg Hauptmarkt in 1927, singing “Die Fahne hoch!” also known as “the Horst Wessel Lied.”
The Nazi party rallies would begin with a performance of “Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg,” an opera by Richard Wagner, which was Hitler’s favorite. The cult of the Nazis had its origins in the music of Wagner which glorified the German past. The rallies lasted for a week and included many speeches, parades, sporting events, and a folk festival.

After Adolf Hitler was appointed the Chancellor of Germany in 1933, an airfield called the Zeppelin Field, outside the city center, was first used for the party rally. The Zeppelin Field offered a huge space for party members to gather and listen to nationalistic speeches.

Albert Speer, who was Hitler’s favorite architect, was commissioned to design a temporary reviewing stand at the Zeppelin Field. He designed a gigantic eagle with a wingspread of over 100 feet. “I spiked it to a timber framework like a butterfly in a collection,” Speer wrote.  The eagle, which is shown in the photo below, was replaced in 1934 by a large reviewing stand.

In 1934, Albert Speer was commissioned to design a permanent stone structure for the party rallies at the Zeppelin Field. According to Speer, his design was “a mighty flight of stairs topped and enclosed by a long colonnade, flanked on both ends by stone abutments. Undoubtedly it was influenced by the Pergamum altar.” He added that “The structure had a length of thirteen hundred feet and a height of eighty feet. It was almost twice the length of the Baths of Caracalla in Rome.”

Entrance to the Tribune and the Golden Hall

Speer wrote that he designed the Tribüne at the Zeppelin Field so that it would still look beautiful even “after generations of neglect, overgrown with ivy, its columns fallen, the walls crumbling here and there, but the outlines still clearly recognizable.”

Regular viewers of the History Channel will recognize the marble reviewing stand at the Zeppelin Field, shown in the photograph above, as the place where the Nazi swastika was blown up by the Allies in a symbolic display of victory over the Nazis on April 24, 1945. The film clip of the dynamiting of the swastika has been shown thousands of time on American TV. On the central promontory, which is the speaker’s stand where Hitler used to give his speeches, you can still make out the faint outline of another swastika which was removed from the marble by the American military.

The destruction of the hated Nazi swastika emblem, encircled by a gold-plated laurel wreath, took place four days after three divisions of the American Seventh Army had captured the city of Nürnberg. The American conquest of Nürnberg was on April 20, 1945, which happened to be Hitler’s 56th birthday. On the day that the swastika was blown up, the victorious Americans held their third victory parade on the Zeppelin field.

This quote is from the newsreel shown in American theaters about the conquest of Nürnberg:

A swastika will no longer flaunt its crooked arms above the Nazi shrine. With the situation well in hand, the Yanks stage a review. Newsreel and Signal Corps camera men made this record of the last days of Hitler’s Germany. The cleansing fires of the war have purged Germany of Nazi power. Let’s be sure it never again rises from her ashes.

The three divisions that fought in the battle of Nuremberg were the 3rd, the 42nd and the 45th Infantry divisions. The 42nd Rainbow Division and the 45th Thunderbird division went on to liberate the Dachau concentration camp on April 29, 1945.

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