Scrapbookpages Blog

October 9, 2016

A Czech volleyball team named Zyklon-B

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust, Uncategorized — Tags: , , , , — furtherglory @ 8:20 am

Some people have no respect for anything – including the Holocaust, in which 6 million Jews were allegedly killed, including many Jews that were allegedly exterminated with Zyklon-B, a poison gas that was used, by the Nazis, to kill the lice that spread typhus, a deadly disease.

You can read about the volleyball team in this news article:

http://www.israelnationalnews.com/News/News.aspx/218726

The following quote is from the news article:

Begin quote from news article

Czech Jews slam volleyball team named for poison used by Nazis

Nazi flag displayed at volleyball game

Nazi flag displayed at volleyball game

This caption is on the photo above:

Czech Jews protest the naming of a children’s volleyball team Cyklon B, after the poison that Nazis used to kill Jews.

This quote is from news article quoted above:

Begin quote from news article:

Czech Jews protested the naming of a children’s volleyball team after the poison that Nazis used to kill Jews and Roma in gas chambers during the Holocaust.

The team Cyklon B – the Czech-language transliteration for the Zyklon B pesticide that the Nazis used — participated recently in a Prague tournament featuring teams from Czech Republic orphanages.

Fans at the tournament, which was sponsored by the ING Bank Fund of the Tereza Maxová Foundation, shouted “Go Cyklon B,” the Pravo daily reported Thursday.

End quote from news article

What does this have to do with anything?

People who study the Holocaust need to know the history of the Czech people, so I am going to tell you a little bit of history:

The Czech people initially had their own dynasty, known as the Premyslides. The famous “Good King Wencelas” was the ruler of the Czechs in the 10th century.

The Czech homeland of Bohemia, which along with Moravia, now constitutes the Czech Republic, came under the rule of the Austrian Hapsburg empire in 1526. It was Joseph II of the Hapsburg family, the ruler of the Austrian Empire, who built a town and named it Theresienstadt (Theresa’s city) after his mother, the Empress Maria Theresa.

This is the same Joseph II, in whose honor Josefov, the Jewish quarter in Prague, was originally named Josefstadt in 1850. Although his mother, Empress Maria Theresa, was an anti-Semite who had expelled the Jews from the Austrian empire for three years, Joseph II was an enlightened monarch who emancipated the Jews of Prague when he became Emperor in 1780 after the death of his mother.

In 1780, when the town of Theresienstadt was originally built as a military garrison at the junction of the Ohre and Elbe rivers, near the Sudeten mountain range in the province of Bohemia, the Czech people, who had lived in this area since the 5th century, did not have an independent country of their own.

Under the terms of the Treaty of Versailles, which was signed after World War I ended, the Hapsburg Empire, by then a multi-ethnic country called Austria-Hungary, was broken up into the separate independent countries of Austria, Hungary, Rumania, Yugoslavia, and Czechoslovakia. The new country of Czechoslovakia was made up of the former states of Bohemia, Moravia, Slovakia, Russian Ruthenia and part of Silesia.

Czechs and ethnic Germans had been living side by side in Bohemia for over a thousand years, and the new country had a population of 6 million Czechs, 3.5 million Germans and 2 million Slovaks.

The Czechs and Slovaks were both Slavic people, like the Russians and the Poles, but the Germans were a completely different ethnic group which had rarely intermarried with the Slavs.

Do these children, who are playing volleyball know anything about the history of the Czechs? I don’t think so. They just want to have fun; they don’t know that the name of their volleyball team upsets the old folks who still remember what the swastika once stood for.