Scrapbookpages Blog

November 29, 2015

Holocaust survivor who ate grass between the rails on the train tracks to Auschwitz

Filed under: Dachau, Holocaust — Tags: , , , — furtherglory @ 5:40 pm

Today, I read a story about Holocaust survivors, which you can read in full here.

The following quote is from the news story:

One woman was packed into a boxcar bound for Auschwitz. So crowded, no one could sit down. People began to starve. The woman, who was a girl then, was extraordinarily tall, with very long arms. There was a hole in the boxcar floor. When the train would stop, she was able to reach her long arms down through the hole and pull up handfuls of grass.

That’s how she survived.

By eating grass.

Railroad tracks usually don't have grass growing between the rails

Railroad tracks usually don’t have grass growing between the rails

This story caught my attention because, as a child, I lived in a house near the railroad tracks that went through my town. I used to put pennies on the track, so that the trains would flatten them.  This was probably a dangerous thing to do, since this might have derailed a train.  But nothing happened, and here I am today, writing a blog.

From my childhood experience, I know that grass does not grow in the middle of the tracks, as long as there are trains traveling on the tracks.  When the tracks are no longer being used, there might be some grass growing between the rails.

I took this photo of some abandoned tracks going into the SS camp at Dachau

I took this photo of some abandoned tracks going into the SS camp at Dachau

 

Another photo which I took of the same tracks at Dachau

Another photo which I took of the same tracks at Dachau

This quote is from the same news article:

World War II ended 70 years ago; children who survived the Holocaust are now in their 80s, adults in their 90s. Nearly 140,000 survivors live in the U.S.

In 15 years, most survivors will be dead.

That’s why Pregulman — who graduated from McCallie School, splits his time between Memphis and Denver, is the son of Merv and Helen Pregulman and grandson of Garrison and Goldie Siskin, founders of Siskin Children’s Institute — began his portrait project, taking survivor photographs as an act of memory and honor.

“To be sure they are not forgotten,” he said.

I believe that stories like this do more harm than good for the Holocaust industry.