Scrapbookpages Blog

April 24, 2017

Remembering the Holocaust on Yom HaShoah

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust, Uncategorized — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 10:42 am

I have been urged, by one of the followers of my blog, to write something about Yom HaShoah, which is currently going on in Israel for the second day.

The following quote is from a news article, which you can read in full at http://www.sun-sentinel.com/florida-jewish-journal/opinion/fl-jjps-jaffe-0419-20170417-story.html

Begin quote

This year, on April 23 and 24, we will once again gather as a community to “Zachor,” to “Gedenk,” to Remember, our parents, grandparents, brothers, sisters and oh so many more of our family members that we, the Children of the Shoah, never had the opportunity to know or to love. They who might have taught us to know what the word “family” meant; who could have given us guidance and direction as we grew up. Those of us who somehow, by some chance, survived the Jewish Holocaust.

And we also are here to honor the “Righteous Among the Nations,” those special selfless citizens who saved Jewish lives. Yes, there were those who saved Jewish children, even those children who were never returned to a Jewish life because their parents and siblings were murdered — and some who were converted to Christianity and remained committed to that faith. We need to be ever grateful. We need to keep reminding the world that such “righteous” people existed, and honor the “hidden children” who later in their lives were committed to have these brave human beings honored at Yad Vashem in Jerusalem.

We, the Children of the Shoah, are the last generation — the last surviving eye-witnesses to a time when the “civilized world” went mad. When civilization died. When humanity lost its meaning. When Jewish children were the first to be eradicated from Europe’s citizenry; when Jewish life was oh so cheap — and when we were surrounded by a “deafening silence” from most of the outside world.

Soon, too soon perhaps for some of us, there will be no one left to recount personal lives and personal losses; to alert our children, grandchildren and schoolchildren to the hatred and dangers that still exist in our world. To make them aware that evil, hatred and prejudice is still alive and well — and spreading — and how they must learn, understand and be prepared throughout their lives for whatever might come as they go forth into adulthood. If we, who somehow did survive the Shoah, do not alert these children and students … WHO WILL?

And so, this year 2017 at our Yom HaShoah commemoration, we the Children of the Shoah here in Boca Raton, remind the world to “Remember” the Shoah, the Holocaust … and, most especially, we remember the one-and-a-half million Jewish children so senselessly and brutally slaughtered.

Yom HaShoah is indeed a sacred mission of remembrance — for the sake of humanity. But, for us, the Child Survivors/Hidden Children of the Shoah, for the rest of our days, until our final breaths … WE WILL REMEMBER THE CHILDREN.

End quote

I am not Jewish, so it is hard for me to get excited about Yom HaShoah. It seems to me that every day is Holocaust Remembrance day. There are numerous survivors of the Shoah, also known as the Holocaust. The survivors were children when the Holocaust was happening. Why didn’t the Nazis realize that these children would grow up to hate the German people for many years to come. Why did the Nazis allow these children to live?

October 22, 2013

Family of deceased “Righteous among Nations” award recipient rejects highest Jewsish honor

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust — Tags: , , , , — furtherglory @ 12:51 pm

One of the most famous recipients of the Jewish honor, known as “Righteous among Nations” was Oskar Schindler who saved 1,200 Jews from certain death, as told in the famous Spielberg film Schindler’s List.

Family members of the first Arab to be given this prestigious honor “have rejected the accolade because of their hatred for Israel,” according to a news article which you can read in full here.

According to the article: “Egyptian doctor Mohamed Helmy was honored posthumously last month by Israel’s Holocaust memorial Yad Vashem for hiding a Jew in Berlin during wartime.”

So an Arab has been honored for saving only one Jew?  The Jews at Yad Vashem must be scraping the bottom of the barrel to find non-Jews who saved at least one Jew during World War II.

Most non-Jews had no sympathy for the Jews during the Holocaust, and did not want to risk their own lives to hide a Jew.

Plaszow camp from which Oskar Schindler saved Jews

Plaszow camp from which Oskar Schindler saved Jews

When Oskar Schindler left his factory, which was a sub-camp of the Gross-Rosen concentration camp, to escape from the Nazis at the end of the war, he was given a ring by the Jewish prisoners whom he had saved.

The ring had been made by the prisoners, who  used gold from the dental work taken out of the mouth of Schindlerjude Simon Jeret. The ring was inscribed “Whoever saves one life saves the world entire.”  Is this what it really said inside the gold ring made by the Jewish prisoners?  Some Holocaust deniers claim that the ring said: “He who saves ONE JEW saves the world entire.”

Do the Jews really believe that saving the life of one goyim is the same as saving the life of one Jew?

German officers at the Belzec death camp

German officers at the Belzec death camp

In the news article, this caption is on the photo above:  “Brave: Dr Mohamed Helmy secretly hid Anna Boros in his cottage near Berlin to save her from being sent to a death camp like Belzec, in occupied Poland, pictured, guarded by armed Nazis.”

Amon Goeth, commandant of Plasow camp

Amon Goeth, commandant of Plasow camp

Wait a minute!  That “Nazi monster” Amon Goeth saved Jews from being sent to the Belzec death camp when he accepted bribes in exchange for sending these doomed Jews to a labor camp instead. Goeth should be given a posthumous award for saving hundreds of Jews from certain death at Belzec.  An Egyptian doctor saved one Jewish girl in Berlin and he gets Israel’s highest award for a non-Jew.  And then, his family rejects the award. Allegedly, there were 10,000 Jews who hid in Germany and were never sent to a Nazi camp.  There could be as many as 10,000 Righteous Gentiles in Germany who deserve a Yad Vashem award.