Scrapbookpages Blog

January 27, 2016

More misuse of Holocaust photos

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 7:47 pm
My photo of the gate into the Sachsenhausen camp

My photo of the gate into the Sachsenhausen concentration camp in Germany

 

People are reflected in a puddle as they walk through the gate of the Sachsenhausen Nazi death camp with the phrase 'Arbeit macht frei' (work sets you free) at the International Holocaust Remembrance Day, in Oranienburg, about 18 miles north of Berlin, on Jan. 27, 2016. (Markus Schreiber / AP)

People are reflected in a puddle as they walk through the gate of the Sachsenhausen Nazi death camp with the phrase ‘Arbeit macht frei’ (work sets you free) at the International Holocaust Remembrance Day, in Oranienburg, about 18 miles north of Berlin, on Jan. 27, 2016. (Markus Schreiber / AP)

Sachsenhausen was NOT a “Nazi death camp” This slogan was never put on the so-called “death camps”.

The following quote is from the news article:

This year’s commemorations come as a resurgence of anti-Semitism casts a shadow over a new generation of European Jews, something that is driving thousands of them each year to leave the continent.

“We must be honest enough to admit that more than 70 years after the Shoah, anti-Semitism is still alive in our ‘civilized’ European Union,” Federica Mogherini, the European Union’s top foreign affairs representative, said in a statement.

Jewish immigration to Israel from Western Europe grew last year due to a rise in anti-Semitic attacks. Most — nearly 8,000 — were from France, where Islamic extremist attacks have destroyed the sense of security previously felt by Europe’s largest Jewish population.

Why is it that no country wants the Jews? The Jews have never done anyone any harm, yet they have been driven out of almost every country in the world, except the USA.

This quote is also from the same news article:

In Berlin, the German Parliament gathered to remember the victims of the Holocaust and heard Ruth Klueger, an Austrian-born writer who survived Auschwitz and other camps, tell of her experience as a camp inmate and slave laborer.

Klueger, now 84, also recalled the initial denial of Nazi crimes in post-war Germany and contrasted that with the country now.

“Two or even three generations have grown up here since then and this country, which was responsible 80 years ago for the worst crimes of the century, has today won the applause of the world thanks to its open borders and the generosity with which it has taken in Syrian and other refugees, and still is,” Klueger said.

So now the Jews approve of Germany, since the country has been ruined by Syrian refugees.  Germany is not Germany any more. Hitler would be turning over in his grave — if he had a grave.