Scrapbookpages Blog

July 14, 2017

17 year old Jewish girl is teaching a class on the Holocaust

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust, Uncategorized — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 8:34 am

Prisoners in Sachsenhausen camp

The following quote is from a news article which you can read in full at http://www.sun-sentinel.com/florida-jewish-journal/news/palm/fl-jjps-weinstein-0719-20170713-story.html

Begin quote

….when [Dara] Weinstein started public high school at Spanish River High School in Boca Raton [Florida] three years ago, she soon learned that the average student in South Palm Beach knew and cared little about the Holocaust and Holocaust survivors.

Weinstein, now 17 herself, shares information about the Holocaust — and what led up to it — she has gleaned from her own studies and research with the students from diverse backgrounds at these centers.

Weinstein said she tries to focus on the Holocaust’s relevance to what is going on in today’s times.

“You have to talk about what was going on in Germany before Hitler came to power and when he first came to power,” Weinstein said. “People don’t just wake up and start murdering millions of other people. There was a trend of deprivation of basic human rights going on that led up to the Holocaust.”

“Kids need to know that this could happen again today if we are not careful and allow the hatred and mistrust of other people to spiral out of control.”

Weinstein’s curriculum includes interactive learning about the Pyramid of Hate; discussions about how discrimination and stereotyping can lead to genocide; and The Butterfly Project — whereby participants construct paper butterflies as a memorial for each of the 1.5 million children who died in the Holocaust.

So far, the curriculum has been very well received.

End quote

Hey, maybe I should start a class on the Holocaust for old people. I could conduct classes in an old folks home, for people who are 71 [not 17].

Here is what I would teach:

The three major camps in the Nazi concentration camp system in Germany were Dachau, Sachsenhausen and Buchenwald. Dachau was the first Nazi concentration camp in the state of Bavaria. Located just outside Munich, it was opened on March 22, 1933, less than two months after Hitler was appointed chancellor of Germany.

Also in 1933, another camp was opened in an old brewery at Oranienburg, 35 kilometers north of Berlin. The Oranienburg camp was rebuilt in 1936 and named Sachsenhausen. Buchenwald was built just outside the city of Weimar in 1937, and its first prisoners were transferred there from Sachsenhausen.

All three of these camps were built to imprison the opponents of Fascism and all three were located in areas which were hotbeds of Communist and Social Democrat political activity. The German state of Bavaria was taken over by Communist revolutionaries on November 7, 1918, just four days before the Armistice which ended World War I was signed on November 11, 1918.

Berlin was the site of the “November Revolution” in 1918 when the Social Democrats toppled the imperial government of Germany and proclaimed a Republic on November 9, 1918. Weimar is where the Social Democrats wrote the constitution for their newly proclaimed Republic; the city is only 20 miles from Gotha, the birthplace of the Social Democrat political party.

Weimar is also the birthplace of the liberal Bauhaus movement of modern art and architecture, which was the direct opposite of the Nazi ideal of classic art, literature, music and architecture.

In 1936 when the Nazis remodeled the Oranienburg camp, which then became Sachsenhausen, the Jews were being persecuted relentlessly and pressured to leave Germany, but no Jews were being sent to any of the concentration camps unless they were political dissidents, trade union organizers, asocials, vagrants, criminals, or race mixers and homosexuals who had broken the law.

In other words, the Jews were not innocent victims, who were doing nothing to upset the Germans.

When construction started on the new Sachsenhausen concentration camp in the summer of 1936, Nazi Germany was the envy of the Western world. From the depths of the Great Depression in 1932, Hitler had achieved an “economic miracle” in Germany in less than three years. As yet, there was no sign of Nazi aggression, nor any attempt at world domination by Germany.

Gertrude Stein, the famous Jewish writer who was a mentor to Ernest Hemingway, even suggested in 1937 that Hitler should be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Because of the Nazi program of nationalism, the German people had regained their self respect after the humiliating Treaty of Versailles, which Germany was forced to sign at the end of World War I. They now had great pride in their ethnicity and their country.

No people in the world were more patriotic than the Germans in 1936 and no other world leader had the total dedication to his country that Adolph Hitler had.

The ordinary Germans were satisfied with their lives and had no reason to fear the concentration camps or the Gestapo. Hitler was a hero to the 127 million ethnic Germans throughout Europe, whom he wanted to unite into the Greater German Empire, a dream that had been discussed in his native Austria for over 50 years. In less than four years, this dream would be accomplished when Austria, parts of Poland that had formerly been German territory, Luxembourg, the French provinces of Alsace and Lorraine, and the Sudetenland were combined with Germany to form the Greater German Reich.

In 1936, Hitler was more loved and admired than all the other world leaders put together. He was also the only world leader who was actively helping the Zionists with their plan to reclaim Palestine as their country.

So, what happened? What changed? You will have to read some Holocaust Denial websites to find out why the Jews were sent to camps.

 

 

 

March 4, 2017

What was it like in Nazi Germany?

Filed under: Germany, Uncategorized — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 7:03 am

If the following text sounds familiar, it is because it was copied from my website, which I wrote before I became a Holocaust denier.

Begin quote from my scapbookpages.com website:

In 1936 when the Nazis remodeled the Oranienburg camp, which then became Sachsenhausen, the Jews were being persecuted relentlessly and pressured to leave Germany, but no Jews were being sent to any of the concentration camps unless they were political dissidents, trade union organizers, asocials, vagrants, criminals, or race mixers and homosexuals who had broken the law.

Rudolf Höss, who came to Sachsenhausen as adjutant on August 1, 1938, wrote in his autobiography:

As an old-time member of the Nazi party, I believed in the need for concentration camps. The real ENEMIES OF THE STATE had to be put away safely; the asocials and the professional criminals who could not be locked up under the prevailing laws had to lose their freedom in order to protect the people from their destructive behavior.

This is the same Rudolf Höss who later became the first Commandant of Auschwitz in May 1940; he was convicted of mass murder in a trial in Poland after the war. After his last wish for a cup of coffee was granted, Höss was hanged in front of the reconstructed gas chamber in Auschwitz in April 1947.

When construction started on the new Sachsenhausen camp in the summer of 1936, Nazi Germany was the envy of the Western world. From the depths of the Great Depression in 1932, Hitler had achieved an “economic miracle” in Germany in less than three years. As yet, there was no sign of Nazi aggression, nor any attempt at world domination by Germany. Gertrude Stein, the famous Jewish writer who was a mentor to Ernest Hemingway, even suggested in 1937 that Hitler should be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Because of the Nazi program of nationalism, the German people had regained their self respect after the humiliating Treaty of Versailles, which Germany was forced to sign at the end of World War I. They now had great pride in their ethnicity and their country. No people in the world were more patriotic than the Germans in 1936 and no other world leader had the total dedication to his country that Adolph Hitler had.

The ordinary Germans were satisfied with their lives and had no reason to fear the concentration camps or the Gestapo. Hitler was a hero to the 127 million ethnic Germans throughout Europe, whom he wanted to unite into the Greater German Empire, a dream that had been discussed in his native Austria for over 50 years. In less than four years, this dream would be accomplished when Austria, parts of Poland that had formerly been German territory, Luxembourg, the French provinces of Alsace and Lorraine, and the Sudetenland were combined with Germany to form the Greater German Reich.

In 1936, Hitler was more loved and admired than all the other world leaders put together. He was also the only world leader who was actively helping the Zionists with their plan to reclaim Palestine as their country.

While America and the rest of Europe were still in the depths of the depression caused by the stock market crash in October 1929, Germany had stabilized its economy and had virtually eliminated unemployment. Unlike the other countries in Europe in 1936, Nazi Germany was doing well, thanks in part to American investment capital.

Many American businessmen, led by auto maker Henry Ford, supported Hitler and his Fascist form of government. Other prominent Americans who supported Hitler included Joseph P. Kennedy (the father of President John F. Kennedy), and Prescott Bush (the grandfather of President George W. Bush) and Charles Lindbergh.

Meanwhile, the American government was drifting to the liberal left; Communist refugees like playwright Bertold Brecht and Jewish refugees like Albert Einstein were flocking to America and their influence was strong in American politics. In the 1936 presidential election in America, Al Smith, who had run as the Democratic candidate in 1928 against Herbert Hoover, accused fellow Democrat President Roosevelt of being a Communist.

Hitler had thumbed his nose at the Versailles Treaty by stopping the payment of reparations to France and Great Britain, and a massive program of industrialization had restored the country to full employment, compared to the 20% unemployment in America in 1936. Roosevelt had copied many of the social welfare programs in Germany, including Social Security, but America was still struggling to recover from the depression.

The workers in Nazi Germany enjoyed unprecedented social benefits such as paid vacations under the Strength Through Joy program (Kraft durch Freude). Factory workers listened to classical music as they worked, and took showers before going home. In order to demonstrate their importance to the country, workers were allowed to march in Nazi parades, carrying shovels on their shoulders just like the soldiers who marched with their rifles.

Everything in Nazi Germany was clean and orderly; there were no slums; the trains ran on time. By 1938, the crime rate was at an all-time low because repeat offenders were being sent to a concentration camp after they had completed their second sentence. Anyone who did not have a permanent address and some visible means of support was hauled off to Dachau and put to work.

The political parties of the opposition (Communists and Social Democrats) had been banned in Germany; political dissidents were being locked up; there was no more bomb throwing or revolutionary fighting in the streets. There were no more crippling general strikes because the trade unions had been banned to prevent the Communists from organizing the workers.

A healthy lifestyle was encouraged by the Nazis and group calisthenics for young people were compulsory. Family values were the order of the day: abortion was banned; homosexuals and prostitutes were imprisoned; women were encouraged to be homemakers, and mothers with four or more children would shortly be awarded military style medals for serving their country.

It was safe to walk the city streets in Germany at night; no bars were needed on the windows of German homes to keep the criminal element out; all the social misfits were being sent away to the concentration camps; bums and vagrants were no longer allowed to beg on the streets. Money that had formerly been spent to care for institutionalized persons with mental and physical disabilities was now being used for other purposes as the mentally ill and the severely disabled were being put to death in gas chambers.

The single-minded Nazis were attempting to achieve a perfect world like Disneyland’s Main Street which ends at a replica of Germany’s Neuschwanstein Castle; their advanced technology was the Tomorrowland of its day. Fifty years later, the backlash from their ideology of racialism and nationalism was the impetus for the creation of today’s Politically Correct world of diversity and tolerance, which is the exact opposite of Nazi Germany.

The Nuremberg laws, enacted in 1935, stripped the Jews of their citizenship and made it a crime for Jews to have sexual intercourse with Germans. Jews were excluded from many jobs and government positions, and they were not allowed to ride on street cars or sit on park benches reserved for Aryans. The rest of the world, particularly Americans, ignored these early warnings; at that time America was a segregated country with institutionalized racism, and there were many restricted neighborhoods where Jews were not allowed to buy a home. American universities had quotas for Jewish students and numerous clubs and organizations did not allow Jews as members. While the Nazi racists were encouraging 300,000 Jews to leave Germany in the 1930ies, the American government was handing a one-way ticket to Mexico to 500,000 Mexican immigrants and Mexican-American citizens during the same time period.

Ever since the leftist revolutions, led by the Jews in Russia and Germany, had brought an end to World War I, the world had been polarized by Communism and Fascism. The first hint that a second world war was soon going to be fought over the conflicting ideologies of Communism and Fascism came in July 1936 with the Spanish Civil War which started when General Francisco Franco led a military revolt against the leftist Republic. Hitler and Mussolini gave their support to Franco, while Roosevelt and the leftist French leader supported the Communist side. The battle lines for World War II were already drawn in 1936 when Nazi Germany formed the Axis Alliance with Mussolini’s Fascist Italy and imperial Japan. In his book Mein Kampf, written while he was imprisoned for treason in 1924, Hitler had already predicted future problems between Japan and the United States.

The Treaty of Versailles included a provision for establishing the League of Nations, which consisted of the Allied countries and any neutral countries that wanted to join. Not until years later was Germany allowed to join. The purpose of the League, which America did not join after Congress voted against it, was to prevent future wars. The League was a forerunner of the United Nations which was formed in May 1945, shortly before the end of the second World War.

Germany was eventually allowed to join the League of Nations in 1926 after the country had been politically rehabilitated, but Hitler had withdrawn from it because the main objective of the Nazi party was to overturn the Treaty of Versailles.

In 1931, the rules of the League of Nations were violated for the first time when Japan invaded China, another member of the League. When the other nations in the League did nothing, this signaled to the world that the Treaty of Versailles could be violated with impunity and this set the stage for Hitler to disregard its terms. By 1936, Hitler had already violated the Treaty by stopping the payment of reparations and by building up an army of 400,00 men, which was considerably larger than the 100,000 soldiers that the Treaty allowed.

Hitler had also put troops into the demilitarized Rhineland in violation of the Treaty of Versailles; then he took back the Ruhr after France had annexed this German territory when Germany was unable to pay reparations after its economy had collapsed a decade earlier.

America had signed a separate peace treaty with Germany after World War I because the American Congress refused to ratify the Treaty of Versailles, so America was in no position to stop Hitler once he started on his path to German hegemony, as world domination by one super power, such as the United States, is now called.

In August 1936, the Olympic games were being held in Berlin, and the Nazis had removed all the bums, winos and male prostitutes from the streets, sending them to Dachau or Sachsenhausen for six months of rehabilitation. Then in a concession to the liberals in America, Great Britain and France, who were threatening to boycott the games, the anti-Semitic signs and slogans on the city streets were temporarily removed and the anti-Jewish newspapers were taken off the stands. Two token Jews were even allowed to train for the Olympics on the German team, and a Jew, Captain Wolfgang Fürstner, was put in charge of the Olympic Village. Fürstner killed himself after he was replaced at the last minute.

The Germans won the most medals for first place, second place and third place in the 1936 Olympics, defeating the second-place Americans by a wide margin of 57 points. The story about Hitler refusing to acknowledge a victory by Jesse Owens was incorrect, according to noted historian John Toland, who wrote:

Begin quote

That the Führer publicly turned his back on the great black athlete was denied by Owens himself, who further claimed that Hitler did pay him a tribute. “When I passed the Chancellor he arose, waved his hand at me, and I waved back at him. I think the writers showed bad taste in criticizing the man of the hour in Germany.”

End quote

Charles Lindbergh, who was America’s greatest hero after flying solo to Europe, was the special guest of Hitler at the Olympics and sat beside him at the games. Lindbergh had by then moved to England in an effort to get away from the rampant crime in America. He was so impressed with Germany’s right-wing Utopia that, by 1938, he was making plans to move there and Hitler’s chief architect, Albert Speer, had been commissioned to design a house for him.

Lindbergh quickly changed his mind in November 1938 after Kristallnacht, the state-sponsored pogrom in Germany, in which the windows of Jewish businesses were smashed and Synagogues were burned. Newspapers around the world played up the story with banner headlines.

Kristallnacht marked the end of Hitler’s popularity and the Western world’s admiration for Germany. Time magazine selected Stalin, the Communist leader of the Soviet Union, for its Man of the Year award in 1939.

During the two days of rioting during the Kristallnacht pogrom in Germany and Austria, on Nov. 9th and 10th in 1938, Nazi officials went to all the small towns in Germany and ordered the Jews to leave within 24 hours or be sent to a concentration camp.

This was a plan to consolidate all the Jews in a few large cities. Those who were unable to leave, or refused to leave, were rounded up in the following days and sent to the three main concentration camps: Dachau, Sachsenhausen and Buchenwald. There were 30,000 Jews in all who were arrested, and around 10,000 were sent to each of these three main camps. They were released within a few weeks if they paid a fine and promised to leave Germany within six months. There were few countries willing to accept them, so the majority wound up in Shanghai which was the only place they could enter without a visa.

In July 1938, President Roosevelt sponsored a conference at which the countries of the Western world met to decide what to do about the problem of thousands of German Jewish refugees, but no country was willing to change its immigration quotas, including the United States of America.

A few of the Jewish prisoners were unable to pay the fine or to raise enough money to leave the country; in 1942, they were all transferred from the concentration camps in Germany to the death camps in what is now Poland where the majority of them died in the Holocaust.

Hitler had predicted that his Third Reich would last for 1,000 years, but it came crashing down after only 12 years, and the image of Germany as the most cultured and advanced civilization in the modern world has been replaced by one of brutality and racism as Germany has become the most hated and reviled country in the world in the post-war Politically Correct era.

End of quote from my kosher website

February 22, 2017

Karl Röder was forced by Nazi officials to forge the “Arbeit macht frei” slogan on the Dachau gate

Filed under: Dachau, Germany, Holocaust, Uncategorized — Tags: , , , — furtherglory @ 5:41 pm
My photo of the gate into the Dachau camp

My photo of the gate into the Dachau camp

The title of this blog post comes from a line in a news article, which you can read in full at http://www.dw.com/en/stolen-arbeit-macht-frei-gate-returned-to-holocaust-memorial-in-dachau/a-37665320

The following quote is from the news article:

Begin quote

The original wrought-iron gate carrying the infamous Nazi slogan “Arbeit macht frei” (“work sets you free”) was returned to Dachau from Norway on Wednesday.

It will be restored and publicly unveiled this April on the 72nd anniversary of the camp’s liberation. The gate will not be returned to its original location, but rather be displayed in the museum on the grounds of the former concentration camp near Munich in Bavaria that now serves as a memorial.

End quote

I have been to the former Dachau camp several times, beginning with my first visit in 1998.

The red brick road up to the Dachau gate

My photo of the red brick road up to the Dachau gatehouse

I have a section on my website about the Dachau gate: http://www.scrapbookpages.com/DachauScrapbook/KZDachau/Gatehouse.html

The iron gate at the entrance through the Dachau gatehouse into the prison compound is shown in my photo at the top of this page.

The sign which reads “Arbeit Macht Frei” was removed soon after the Dachau camp was liberated, but it was reconstructed in 1965 at the same time that two barrack buildings were reconstructed for visitors. One of the reconstructed barracks can be seen on the left side of my photo at the top of this page.

The slogan “Arbeit Macht Frei” was allegedly coined by Propaganda Minister Josef Goebbels in an effort to convince the public that the Nazi concentration camps were merely work camps designed to politically rehabilitate Communists, Social Democrats and anarchists.

This slogan was first used over the gate of a “wild camp” in the city of Oranienburg which was set up in an abandoned brewery in March 1933 during the time that the first political prisoners were being held for an indefinite period without charges in a number of places in Germany.

In 1936, the Oranienburg camp was rebuilt as the Sachsenhausen camp. The Dachau camp was also rebuilt, starting in 1936. The gatehouse at Sachsenhausen also bears this inscription, but the third major German concentration camp, Buchenwald, has a sign on the gate that reads “Jedem das Seine,” which means To Each his Own.

Dachau and Sachsenhausen were both Class I camps for offenders, who were considered capable of being rehabilitated and who were eligible for possible release.

Rudolf Höss, who trained at Dachau and then served as an adjutant at Sachsenhausen before becoming the first Commandant at Auschwitz, used this motto over the gate into the main camp, Auschwitz I, which was classified as a Class I camp for political prisoners. Auschwitz II, also known as Birkenau, was not a Class I camp, so Birkenau did not have this slogan over the gatehouse.

Two other Nazi concentration camps which used the slogan “Arbeit Macht Frei” on their gate houses were Flossenbürg and Gross-Rosen. This slogan also appeared on a gate inside the Gestapo prison in the Small Fortress at Terezin, formerly known as Theresienstadt.

February 20, 2017

A Jewish visitor to Sachsenhausen completely misunderstands the history of the camp

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust, Uncategorized — Tags: , , , — furtherglory @ 2:44 pm
My photo of the sculpture at Sachsenhausen

My photo of the sculpture at Sachsenhausen

You can read, in this news article, about how a young Jewish woman was completely mislead about Sachsenhausen: http://jewishjournal.com/opinion/215357/burned-ovens-drowned-sea-rammed-vehicles-bombed-pieces-marched-death-world-want-jews-us-today/

I have a section on my website where you can read all about Sachsenhausen: https://www.scrapbookpages.com/Sachsenhausen/index.html

The following quote is from the news article:

Begin quote

I walked into a concentration camp in Germany – and I walked out. A Jewish woman leaving a Nazi camp defies the odds and realities of millions of human beings.

“If you are done with the alt-right you filthy kike, then fuck off to Israel or just get into the oven. Problem solved.” A man wrote me those words, which I read before coming face to face with the crematorium at a Nazi concentration camp in Germany, the very ovens where bodies of millions of Jews were incinerated.

I found myself unexpectedly terrorized, shaken to my core. Never did I imagine visiting a concentration camp. Despite being born to a Jewish mother, I had zero desire and felt no family connection to the Holocaust. But there I found myself in Sachsenhausen: standing trapped within barbed wire and walls, fighting the most intense bone chill of my life, losing hope in humanity and in myself.

On the heels of hearing a German parliamentarian negate that anti-Semitism is on the rise in Europe or worldwide, a cab driver affirm that Jews were responsible for 9/11, and a former neo-Nazi quote an Austrian military officer in saying his radical political beliefs would have been welcome had they won the war, I felt paralyzed – staring into the ovens in search of answers, of lessons, of direction.

End quote

You can read about Sachsenhausen on my website at http://www.scrapbookpages.com/Sachsenhausen/ConcentrationCamp/GasChamber.html

The following quote is from my website:

Station Z was the nickname that the SS gave to the execution site at Sachsenhausen. Beginning in the fall of 1939, Station Z was the site where prisoners who had been condemned to death in a Nazi court were executed by a firing squad.

According to the memoirs of Rudolf Höss, who was on the staff at Sachsenhausen for a time, anyone who was convicted of war-time sabotage or enemy activity against the state was sent to the nearest concentration camp for execution, and the first such execution after the war started in 1939 was carried out at Sachsenhausen when a Communist, who had refused to perform his assigned air raid duties in an aircraft factory, was shot.

Staton Z is also the location of an alleged gas chamber that was allegedly first put into operation in 1943, presumably to gas Russian POWs since there were no Jews in the camp at that time.

At a Military Tribunal conducted by the Soviet Union in October 1947, Camp Commandant Anton Kaindl confessed to the gassing of prisoners, on his own authority, at Sachsenhausen. This was an obvious lie.

The gas chamber and the execution site were both inside the Industrial Yard, where the factories were located; they were separated from the prison enclosure by a brick wall.

The name Station Z was intended to be a joke, according to the Memorial Site, because the entrance to the camp was through Building A, which was the gate house, and Station Z was the exit from the camp for those who had been executed.

End quote from my website

July 2, 2016

pesecution of the Gypsies in the Holocaust

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust — Tags: , , , , — furtherglory @ 9:52 am
Famous photo of Stella Steinbach

Famous photo of Stella Steinbach

Several years ago, when I visited the memorial site at the Sachsenhausen concentration camp, I saw the famous photo of Stella Steinbach displayed in the Gypsy museum there.

photo taken in Gypsy museum at Sachsehausen

My photo taken in the Gypsy museum

A permanent exhibition entitled “The National Socialist Genocide of the Sinti and Roma” is shown at the Sachenhausen Memorial Site in the main western building of the SS workshops in the former Industrial Yard, outside the former prison enclosure at Sachsenhausen. This building was constructed in 1937-38; it was converted into museum space in 2001. A sign at the entrance to the Sachsenhausen Memorial Site directs visitors to the left where a road leads through the former Industrial Yard to the Museum.

The exhibits in the Sinti and Roma Museum consist only of photographs and text which tell the history of the Nazi genocide of the Gypsies. All of the text is in the German language with no translations into other languages. There are no artifacts, only photographs on large display boards.

The following quote about Stella Steinbach is from this website: http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/Holocaust/ChildHolo.html

Begin quote

Anna Maria (Settela) Steinbach (December 23rd, 1934–July 31st, 1944) was a Dutch girl who was gassed in Nazi Germany’s Auschwitz concentration camp. She remained the symbol of the prosecution of the Dutch Jews, until it was discovered in 1994 that she was not Jewish but had belonged to the Sinti group of the Romani people.

Steinbach was born in Buchten near Born in southern Limburg as the daughter of a trader and violinist. On May 16th, 1944, a razzia against the Roma was organized in the whole of the Netherlands. Steinbach was arrested in Eindhoven. That very same day, she arrived with another 577 people in Camp Westerbork. 279 were allowed to leave again because although they lived in trailers they were not Roma. In Westerbork, Steinbach’s head was shaved as a preventive measure against head lice. Like the other Roma girls and women, she wore a torn sheet around her head to cover her bald head.

On May 19th, Settela was put on a transport together with 244 other Roma to Auschwitz-Birkenau on a train that contained also Jewish prisoners. Right before the doors were being closed, she apparently stared through the opening at a passing dog or the German soldiers. Rudolf Breslauer, a Jewish prisoner in Westerbork, who was shooting a movie on orders of the German camp commander filmed the image of Settela’s fearsome glance staring out of the wagon. Crasa Wagner also was in the same wagon and heard Settela’s mother call her name and warned her to pull her head out of the opening. Crasa Wagner survived Auschwitz and was able to identify Settela in 1994.

On May 22nd, the Dutch Roma, among whom was Settela Steinbach, arrived in Auschwitz-Birkenau. They were registered and taken to the Roma section. Roma that were fit to work were taken to ammunition factories in Germany. The remaining three thousand Roma were gassed in the period from July to August 3rd. Steinbach, her mother, two brothers, two sisters, her aunt, two nephews and a niece were part of this latter group. Of the Steinbach’s family, only the father survived who died in 1946 and lies buried in the cemetery of Maastricht.

End quote

One of the displays in the museum, at the Sachsenhauen memorial site, tells about the Gypsies who were transported from Westerbork, a transit camp in the Netherlands, to Auschwitz on May 19, 1944.

At Auschwitz, the Gypsies were put into a separate section where families were allowed to stay together. According to the Sachsenhausen Museum exhibit, on the night of the 2nd and 3rd of August 1944, Settela and her mother and 9 sisters were murdered in the gas chamber at Auschwitz.  What else could have happened to them? Could they have been taken to another camp? No one knows.

 

January 27, 2016

More misuse of Holocaust photos

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 7:47 pm
My photo of the gate into the Sachsenhausen camp

My photo of the gate into the Sachsenhausen concentration camp in Germany

 

People are reflected in a puddle as they walk through the gate of the Sachsenhausen Nazi death camp with the phrase 'Arbeit macht frei' (work sets you free) at the International Holocaust Remembrance Day, in Oranienburg, about 18 miles north of Berlin, on Jan. 27, 2016. (Markus Schreiber / AP)

People are reflected in a puddle as they walk through the gate of the Sachsenhausen Nazi death camp with the phrase ‘Arbeit macht frei’ (work sets you free) at the International Holocaust Remembrance Day, in Oranienburg, about 18 miles north of Berlin, on Jan. 27, 2016. (Markus Schreiber / AP)

Sachsenhausen was NOT a “Nazi death camp” This slogan was never put on the so-called “death camps”.

The following quote is from the news article:

This year’s commemorations come as a resurgence of anti-Semitism casts a shadow over a new generation of European Jews, something that is driving thousands of them each year to leave the continent.

“We must be honest enough to admit that more than 70 years after the Shoah, anti-Semitism is still alive in our ‘civilized’ European Union,” Federica Mogherini, the European Union’s top foreign affairs representative, said in a statement.

Jewish immigration to Israel from Western Europe grew last year due to a rise in anti-Semitic attacks. Most — nearly 8,000 — were from France, where Islamic extremist attacks have destroyed the sense of security previously felt by Europe’s largest Jewish population.

Why is it that no country wants the Jews? The Jews have never done anyone any harm, yet they have been driven out of almost every country in the world, except the USA.

This quote is also from the same news article:

In Berlin, the German Parliament gathered to remember the victims of the Holocaust and heard Ruth Klueger, an Austrian-born writer who survived Auschwitz and other camps, tell of her experience as a camp inmate and slave laborer.

Klueger, now 84, also recalled the initial denial of Nazi crimes in post-war Germany and contrasted that with the country now.

“Two or even three generations have grown up here since then and this country, which was responsible 80 years ago for the worst crimes of the century, has today won the applause of the world thanks to its open borders and the generosity with which it has taken in Syrian and other refugees, and still is,” Klueger said.

So now the Jews approve of Germany, since the country has been ruined by Syrian refugees.  Germany is not Germany any more. Hitler would be turning over in his grave — if he had a grave.

August 11, 2011

The Nazis used Zyklon-B poison gas to kill both Jews and lice

Filed under: Buchenwald, Holocaust — Tags: , , , — furtherglory @ 9:13 am

One of the cruelest things that the Nazis ever did was to use the same kind of poison gas to kill both the Jews and the lice in the clothing of the prisoners.  The Nazis used the word GASKAMMER (gas chamber) to mean a building where clothing was disinfected. They used the term Leichenkeller (corpse celler) for two of the homicidal gas chambers at Auschwitz-Birkenau, but most of the homicidal gas chambers, used by the Nazis, were disguised as shower rooms, including two of the homicidal gas chambers at Birkenau.

Zyklon-B gas pellets on dispaly in Mauthausen Museum

Disinfection building at Auschwitz-Birkenau

The photo above shows one of the disinfection buildings at the Auschwitz II camp, aka Birkenau, which has a Gaskammer for killing lice, which spreads typhus. The gate on the right is the entrance into the women’s barracks sections B1a and B1b from the road that bisects the entire camp from south to north, going from here all the way to the Mexico section on the north side of the camp. When I took this photo in October 2005, the disinfection buildings were not open to the public, and there was no tourist information display board.  Today, there are so many visitors to Auschwitz that everyone must join a tour group; visitors are not allowed to roam around on their own and peek into the windows of the disinfection buildings like I did.

On this blog site you can read about the use of Zyklon-B to exterminate both humans and lice:

The Nazis delivered exactly the same amount (195 kg) of Zyklon B to two camps on April 30 1944.

Auschwitz where c.1,000,000 people were killed with Zyklon B

Oranienburg where no-one is claimed to have been killed with Zyklon B

Oranienburg is the name of the town where the Sachsenhausen camp was located; the name of the camp is sometimes given as Oranienburg.

The original camps, that were set up in 1933 when 2,000 Communists were arrested following the burning of the Reichstag, included a “wild camp” at Oranienburg that was set up in an old brewery.  This camp was later abandoned and a new camp, named Sachsenhausen, was built in Oranienburg in 1936.  This was the same year that Dachau was rebuilt; the original Dachau camp was set up in an abandoned munitions factory just outside the town of Dachau.

The Soviet Union liberated the Sachsenhausen camp, after most of the prisoners had been evacuated, and when Germany was divided into zones of occupation, the camp was in the Soviet zone. The Soviets claimed that there was a gas chamber at Sachsenhausen.  You can read about the Sachsenhausen gas chamber and see photos of the ruins on my web site here.  As far as I know, the Sachsenhausen Memorial Site is still claiming that there was a homicidal gas chamber, disguised as a shower room, in this camp.

The Commandant of Sachsenhausen confessed at his trial that he was responsible for the gas chamber at Sachsenhausen.  You can read about his trial on my web site here.

At the Nuremberg International Military Tribunal, there were claims about gas chambers at all of the major camps, including Buchenwald. Holocaust denial began when Paul Rassinier disputed the claim of a gas chamber at Buchenwald.  There are still many people who believe in the Buchenwald gas chamber, including Barack Obama; you can read about the alleged Buchenwald gas chamber on my web site here.

Don’t go denying the Nazi gas chambers or you could wind up in prison in 17 countries in Europe.

April 20, 2011

April 20th — on this day in history…

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust, World War II — Tags: , , , — furtherglory @ 9:33 am

April 20th is an important day in history.  On this day in 1945, American soldiers of the 3rd, 42nd and 45th Infantry Divisions of the US Seventh Army were celebrating their conquest of Nürnberg, the most German of all cities, considered to be the capital of German nationalism, and Hitler’s favorite city. Where Hitler’s soldiers, a hundred thousand at a time, had once goose-stepped past the reviewing stand at the Zeppelin Field in Nürnberg, American soldiers were doing a victory march on April 20, 1945 and mocking Hitler with a stiff-armed salute from the speaker’s platform.

Nürnberg in 1945 Photo Credit: Charles J. Sheridan

(more…)

March 1, 2011

What really happened to Ernst Thälmann?

Filed under: Buchenwald, Germany, World War II — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 10:10 am

Ernst Thälmann was the leader of the KPD (Communist political party) in Germany before the start of World War II.

In a recent comment on my blog, Herbert Stolpman wrote that Ernst Thälmann was shot on the orders of Hitler at Buchenwald in 1944. The death of Ernst Thälmann is a controversial subject which deserves a blog post of its own.

In October 1999, I visited the Buchenwald Memorial Site where I saw a plaque on the wall of the crematorium, which is shown in the photo below.  The plaque hangs at the spot where Thälmann was allegedly shot on the orders of Hitler.

Plaque on the wall of the crematorium at Buchenwald

The day after I visited Buchenwald, I went to the Sachsenhausen Memorial Site where I learned that two of the most prominent political prisoners who were imprisoned there were the Chairman of the German Communist party, Ernst Thälmann, and the Chairman of the Social Democrat party, Dr. Rudolf Breitscheid. Just the day before, I had learned that Thälmann was executed in front of the crematorium at Buchenwald on August 18, 1944 and that Dr. Breitscheid was killed in an Allied bombing raid on Buchenwald on August 24, 1944.   (more…)

August 30, 2010

How many of the Nazi gas chambers are still in existence?

Filed under: Dachau, Germany, Holocaust — Tags: , , , , , , — furtherglory @ 7:34 am

This morning I read on a blog that there are only four Nazi gas chambers still in existence in all of Europe.  It took me a minute to think of which four gas chambers, to which this blogger might be referring.

It is universally accepted by Holocaust historians that there were six extermination camps where Jews were gassed during the Holocaust: Auschwitz-Birkenau, Majdanek, Chelmno, Belzec, Sobibor and Treblinka.

The gas chambers at Chelmno, Belzec, Sobibor and Treblinka were destroyed more than 65 years ago and nothing remains of them. Three of the four gas chambers at Birkenau were destroyed by the Nazis in January 1945 and one was destroyed by the prisoners in October 1944.

There were also gas chambers at Mauthausen, Dachau, Sachsenhausen, Ravensbrück and Stutthof.  The  original gas chambers at Mauthausen, Dachau and Stutthof are still there, as are the gas chambers in Building No. 41 at Majdanek. There are also reconstructed gas chambers at Majdanek and the main Auschwitz camp.

One of the euthanasia gas chambers, the one at Hartheim Castle, was also used to gas concentration camp prisoners from Dachau and Mauthausen.  There is a building located about a mile from the Natzweiler camp, which is alleged to have been a gas chamber where 86 Jews from Auschwitz were brought to be killed; you can read about it on another blog post that I wrote.

I have visited and photographed five of the remaining gas chambers in Europe: Auschwitz, Majdanek, Dachau, Mauthausen and Hartheim.  I also visited the site of “the little white house” which was used at Birkenau before the four large gas chambers were built.  The location of “the little red house,” which was the first gas chamber at Birkenau, is unknown.

Dachau gas chamber

Reconstructed gas chamber at Auschwitz main camp

Mauthausen gas chamber

One of the gas chambers in Building No. 41 at Majdanek

Building No. 41 at Majdanek has four gas chambers

Gas chamber at Hartheim Castle

Stutthof Gas Chamber

Stutthof Gas Chamber

You can see more photos of the reconstructed gas chamber in the main Auschwitz camp here and more photos of the Hartheim gas chamber here.

The remains of “the liitle white house” used as a gas chamber at Birkenau

You can read all about “the little white house” here.

Ruins of the Sachsenhausen gas chamber

The floor of the Sachsenhausen gas chamber is shown in the photo above.  The gas chamber was disguised as a shower room with one floor drain.  In the background, you can see the ruins of the cremation ovens.  You can read about the Sachsenhausen gas chamber here.

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