Scrapbookpages Blog

June 13, 2017

Holocaust survivor writes his memoir at the age of 90

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust, Uncategorized — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 11:06 am

90-year-old Holocaust survivor Samuel Pivnik visits  the Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp where he was a prisoner

Note that, in the photo above, you can see a faint view of the gate into the camp. My photo below shows the same view of the gate into the Auschswitz-Birkenau camp.

My photo of the gate into Auschwitz-Birkenau

Auschwitz-Birkenau was a death camp where Jews were killed in gas chambers with Zyklon-B gas; why was Samuel Pivnik spared?

The following quote is from a news article which you can read in full at http://www.dw.com/en/why-one-of-the-last-remaining-auschwitz-survivors-wrote-a-memoir-decades-later/a-39208305

Begin quote

DW: Mister Pivnik, you are 90 years old. Why did you decide to tell your story in a book recently? The book, “Survivor: Auschwitz, the Death March and my Fight for Freedom,” was published in English in 2013 and in German in 2017. Why not earlier?

Samuel Pivnik: It was only in the late 1990s that I seriously started to consider writing my memoirs. Other survivors I knew had already written books.

Sam Pivnik (Philip Appleby) Pivnik, now 90, lives in London

There was really no interest in our stories immediately after the war. It wasn’t until I was approached by a close friend of mine in 1999, the artist David Breuer-Weil, who urged me very strongly to write. He felt that I had an obligation to humanity to tell my story so that people could learn lessons that may help to prevent them from descending into the depths of depravity again. I then began to seriously start the process. It wasn’t until 2011 that my agent introduced me to a professional ghostwriter named Mei Trow. As a result of my work with him, the book started to interest big publishers.

End quote

The photo at the top of this page shows the railroad tracks into the Auschwitz-Birkenau camp. Jews were brought on trains to this death camp and were allegedly gassed to death immediately with Zyklon-B.

Auschwitz is a name that was virtually unknown before 1989. Now it has become a symbol for The Holocaust, which was the Nazi plan to systematically exterminate all the Jews of Europe; this allegedly resulted in the deaths of 6 million Jews.

Auschwitz is the site of the greatest mass murder of all time, the most infamous Nazi death factory, the primary killing site where the “Final Solution to the Jewish Question” was carried out by means of homicidal gas chambers, the most heinous place on earth.

An estimated 1.3 million victims arrived at Auschwitz between June 1940 and January 1945 and 1.1 million of them died there, including over 900,000 Jews. Today there are millions of visitors who tour Auschwitz-Birkenau each year.

The world first learned that the Jews were being gassed at Auschwitz when resistance fighters in the Polish Underground passed this information on to the Polish government in exile in Great Britain.

On June 25, 1942, The Telegraph, a British newspaper, ran a story about the mass murder of Jews in gas chambers at Auschwitz. The headline read “Germans murder 700,000 Jews in Poland.” According to this first report, which was also broadcast on the radio by the British BBC in June 1942, a thousand Jews a day were being gassed.

Auschwitz is more than one place: it is a small town in what is now Poland, but the name Auschwitz also refers to three separate prison camps called Auschwitz I, Auschwitz II and Auschwitz III, all of which were located just outside the town. The Auschwitz complex was an extermination camp, a labor camp, a transit camp and a concentration camp, all rolled into one.

Auschwitz I was the main camp; it was a Class I concentration camp, which was opened in June 1940 in the barracks of a former Polish Army garrison. The first prisoners were mostly non-Jewish Polish political prisoners, but a few Jews were also imprisoned there.

Auschwitz II was the death camp where million of prisoners, mainly Jews, were allegedly killed, mostly in gas chambers; today, Auschwitz is the world’s largest Jewish graveyard, the place where the ashes of innocent victims were scattered over the fields, thrown into the rivers, or dumped into several small ponds sixty five years ago.

Auschwitz III was a work camp where prisoners worked in the factories of the I.G. Farben company, along side civilian workers who were not prisoners.

The town of Auschwitz, which was originally founded by Germans in 1270, is now known by its Polish name, Oswiecim, and the three camps are known as Auschwitz, Birkenau, and Monowitz. The Polish name for Birkenau is Brzezinka and Monowitz is called Monowice by the Poles.

In June 2007, the United Nations officially changed the collective name of the three Auschwitz camps to Auschwitz-Birkenau, German Nazi Concentration and Extermination Camp (1940-1945). This change was made at the request of the government of Poland so that people will know that Poland had nothing to do with setting up the camps or running them.

 

 

Blog at WordPress.com.