Scrapbookpages Blog

January 6, 2016

Jewish Degenerate art which Hitler hated

Filed under: Dachau, Germany, Holocaust — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 8:40 am
New Holocaust Museum in Skokie, Illinois

New Holocaust Museum in Skokie, Illinois

You can read about the new Holocaust museum in Skokie in this news article: http://chicagotonight.wttw.com/2016/01/05/architecture-tells-its-own-story-illinois-holocaust-museum

The architecture of the Museum is an example of the “degenerate art” which Hitler hated.

The following quote is from the news article:

Originally opened as a small storefront in Skokie in 1984, the Illinois Holocaust Museum initially came out of a protest to a neo-Nazi rally in the late 1970s. The rally never happened and instead, in 1981, the Holocaust Memorial Foundation of Illinois was formed, largely via the efforts of local survivors.

I previously blogged about “degenerate art” which Hitler hated: https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2010/04/17/entartete-kunst-degenerate-art/

My photo of artwork at Dachau

My 1998 photo of artwork at Dachau Memorial site

 

My photo of the back side of the Dachau monument

My photo of the back side of the Dachau monument, taken in the rain

The point that I am trying to make here, dear readers, is that there was a vast difference between the thinking of the Jews and the thinking of Hitler and the Nazis.  Hitler wanted the Jews out of Germany because he wanted a country for the German people, not a country for Jews.

This quote is from the beginning of the news article, cited above:

Like Star Wars, the space we’re currently standing in has physical “light” and “dark” sides, says my tour guide, a petite blonde who grew up in Chicago and “geeks out” over all things architecture.

She’s referring to a critical component of the overarching design of the Illinois Holocaust Museum and Education Center, a building designed by Chicago architect Stanley Tigerman which opened to the public in 2009. The light and dark refer to the architectural experience visitors are meant to have as they move through the museum, beginning with a stark industrial feel at the onset, ultimately moving towards rounded white rooms flooded with natural light. At the time it opened, Chicago Tribune architectural critic Blair Kamin called it both “moving and flawed.”

Today, we’ve just missed the school tours and the building is relatively quiet, save for TVs in the exhibits, many of which contain survivors talking, remembering.