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August 14, 2013

90-year-old survivor of Treblinka death camp unveils foundation stone for future Treblinka education center designed by his daughter

Original sign on entrance to Treblinka camp

Original sign on entrance to Treblinka camp

Treblinka was one of the three Nazi camps, which were called “the Operation Reinhard camps,” named after Reinhard Heydrich, the man who was the chairman of the Wannsee Conference held on January 20, 1942.  According to the official Holocaust history, these three camps were allegedly set up, following the conference, to carry out “The Final Solution,” which is now claimed, by the Holocaustians, to be the plan to genocide the Jews.  The other two Reinhard camps were Belzec and Sobibor.  (The Nazis called these three camps “transit camps,” from which Jews were “transported to the East,” never to be seen again.)

I previously blogged about Treblinka here.  I quoted some of the testimony of other Treblinka survivors in a blog post here.

Treblinka is second only to Auschwitz in the number of Jews who were killed in the Holocaust. The number of Jews killed at Treblinka is holding at 870,000 while the number of Jews killed at Auschwitz has dwindled down to 900,000.  (An additional 200,000 non-Jews were killed at Auschwitz, bringing today’s estimated total deaths to 1.1 million.)

A news article, which you can read in full here, tells about Samuel Willenberg, the lone survivor of the 750 Jews who were selected to work in the Treblinka camp.  (When I took a guided tour of Treblinka in 1998, I was told that there were 1,000 workers in the camp.)

This quote is from the news article:

On this anniversary Samuel Willenberg began the realisation of a long-held dream. He unveiled a foundation stone for a future Treblinka education centre designed by his architect daughter, Orit.

Treblinka sorely needs an “education centre.”  The Nazis left no evidence behind, except the ashes of the 870,000 Jews who were killed.  Sadly, the ashes have been covered over by a “symbolic cemetery,” which is shown in the photos below.

Monument at Treblinka stands in the spot where a gas chamber was located

Monument at Treblinka stands in the spot where a gas chamber was located

The ashes of 870, 000 Jews are covered by a symbolic cemetery

The ashes of 870, 000 Jews are covered by a symbolic cemetery

A huge sculpture represents the train tracks and the train platform

A huge sculpture represents the train tracks and the train platform

The photograph above shows a stone sculpture where a railroad spur line ended, with a stone platform to the left. When the camp was in operation, there was a real train platform in this spot and behind it was a storehouse, disguised as a train depot, which was used to store the clothing and other items which the victims had brought with them to the camp.

In the background of the photo above, you can see a line of 10 stones which mark the boundary line of the camp. The stones represent the different countries, from which the Jews were transported by train to be exterminated here in this remote, God-forsaken spot in the forest.  These countries included German-occupied Greece, Bulgarian-occupied Greece, Czechoslovakia, Poland, Belgium, France, Germany, Austria, and Yugoslavia.

Why not just shoot the Greek Jews in Greece, and the Belgian Jews in Belgium, you ask?  The Nazis never did anything in an efficient way.  There was a war going on, and the Nazis were using valuable trains to transport the Jews to some remote spot, along the Bug river, to kill them.

Bridge over the Bug river, which is shown on the right

Railroad bridge over the Bug river, which is shown on the right

After the joint conquest of Poland by the Germans and the Russians in September 1939, the river Bug (pronounced Boog) became the border between the German-occupied General Government of Poland and the Russian zone of occupation.  The bridge, shown in the photo above, does not cross the river into the Russian zone; this is a bridge across a bend in the river.

Germany invaded the Soviet Union in June 1941 and conquered the strip of eastern Poland that was being occupied by the Russians. Treblinka is located in the former General Government.

The Treblinka camp was divided into three sections. On the far left of the train platform where the Jews arrived was the section where the guards and administrators lived. The Jews, who worked at Treblinka, lived in Camp 1, next to the SS barracks. Today, only the area where the Jews were gassed and burned, has been preserved; the rest of the camp is now covered with trees. The whole Treblinka camp covered about 22 acres, but today’s visitors see an area that is about 7 acres in size.

The photo below was copied from the BBC article about Treblinka.

Mr Willenberg's drawing of the Treblinka infirmary shows mass shootings

Mr Willenberg’s drawing of the Treblinka infirmary shows mass shootings

The photo above, which was printed in the BBC article, shows the Treblinka INFIRMARY, aka hospital, and a large pit containing some bodies from MASS SHOOTINGS.  What happened to the gas chambers?  Does Samuel Willenberg deny the gas chambers at Treblinka?

No. Don’t panic.  The lone survivor of Treblinka is not denying that there were gas chambers at Treblinka.

I vaguely recall reading, in the pamphlet that I got from the Visitor’s center in 1998, something about the “hospital” at Treblinka.  The map in the camp pamphlet, which I obtained on my trip to Treblinka in 1998, is similar to the map shown below.

Map of the Treblinka camp

Map of the Treblinka camp

Near the bottom of the map shown above, you can see the curved “Tube” which led to the “gas chamber.”  No. 36 on the map designates the fake “train station” where the Jews got off the trains which were backed into the camp, a few cars at a time, on a railroad spur line, built by the Nazis.

To the right of the spot where the train platform once stood, and in front of you as you are looking into the camp with the platform on the left, is the location of the “burial pits for those who died during transportation,” according to the camp pamphlet. The victims were brought to the camp in freight cars, except for a few Very Important Jews, who arrived in passenger cars.

Near the burial pits, according to the pamphlet, was an “execution site (disguised as a hospital).” This is where the Jews, who were too weak or sick to walk into the gas chambers, were shot and then buried in the pits, according to the pamphlet.

Half way up the gentle slope to where the symbolic graveyard now stands, there were “3 old gas chambers” according to the pamphlet, and a short distance to the south of them were built “10 new gas chambers.”

According to my 1998 tour guide, the first gas chambers used carbon monoxide. The 10 new gas chambers used the poison gas known as Zyklon-B, according to the pamphlet that I purchased at the Visitor’s Center. Treblinka apparently did not have delousing chambers; all the clothing taken from the prisoners was sent to the Majdanek camp to be disinfected with Zyklon-B before being sent to Germany.  Two of the “gas chambers” at Majdanek have now been down-graded to disinfection chambers, and the number of Jewish deaths at Majdanek have dwindled down to 59,000.

A short distance, farther up the slope, to the east of the gas chambers at Treblinka, was located the “cremation pyres” according to the map in the camp pamphlet. None of the three Operation Reinhard extermination camps had a crematorium for burning the bodies of the 1.5 million Jews who were allegedly killed in these camps.

Of the other five extermination camps, which were in operation during the same period (Chelmno, Sobibor, Belzec, Majdanek and Auschwitz-Birkenau), only Auschwitz-Birkenau and Majdanek, which also functioned as forced labor camps, had crematoria with ovens for burning the bodies.

It seems that Treblinka is now being promoted as the most important “extermination camp” in the Holocaust, as the number of deaths in the other camps dwindle down, down, down.

Why Treblinka?  Because the Nazis left no evidence there.  This means that the Holocaustians can make up any story about Treblinka.

This quote is from the BBC article:

When the Nazis left Treblinka in 1943 they thought they had destroyed it. They had knocked down the buildings and levelled (sic) the earth. They had built a farmhouse and installed a Ukrainian “farmer”. They had planted trees, and – contemporary reports suggest – lupins.

But if they thought they had removed all evidence of their crime, they hadn’t. For a forensic archaeologist, there is a vast amount to study.

Sadly, there is also a “vast amount” for revisionists to study at Treblinka.  Read this article at the Inconvenient History website: http://revblog.codoh.com/2012/01/comment-sturdy-colls/

March 26, 2013

Proof that the dying victims inside the Auschwitz gas chamber scratched the walls with their fingernails

There seems to be an inordinate amount of interest in the fingernail scratches on the walls of the gas chamber in the main Auschwitz camp, judging by the number of visitors to my blog posts about the scratches.  But is there any proof that the scratches were made by the victims, and not by tourists in recent years?  Did the victims really scratch “Never Again” and a Star of David on the walls of the gas chamber in the main Auschwitz camp as they were dying?

I set out to do a search to find some proof that the scratches were made by the dying Jews.  I found the proof in a documentary entitled Auschwitz: Inside the Nazi State.  In Episode 1 of this documentary, the scratches were confirmed by the testimony of Dario Gabbai, a Jew who worked as a Sonderkommando, removing the bodies from one of the gas chambers at the Auschwitz II camp, aka Birkenau.

In the YouTube video below, you can see a scene, at 1:34 minutes into the video, that depicts the Wannsee Conference where “The Final Solution” was planned by the Nazis. It is pointed out in the video that “The Final Solution” was the name that the Nazis gave to “the extermination of the Jews.”

The following quote is from the transcript of the documentary, Auschwitz: Inside the Nazi State:

As the war developed Nazi decision makers conceived one of the most infamous policies in all history. What they called the ‘Final Solution’—the extermination of the Jews. And at Auschwitz they journeyed down the long and crooked road to mass murder to create this—the building which symbolised (sic) their crime—a factory of death.

Dario Gabbai—Jewish prisoner, Auschwitz 1944-45: “They were, the people screaming—all the people, you know—they didn’t know what to do, scratching the walls, crying until the gas took effect. If I close my eyes, the only thing I see is standing up—women with children in, in their hands, there.”

So who is Dario Gabbai?  This quote is from the Wikipedia entry for him:

David Dario Gabbai (born 1922) is a Greek Sephardi Jew and Holocaust survivor, notable for his role as a member of the Sonderkommando at Auschwitz. He was deported to the camp in March 1944 and put to work in one of the crematoria at Birkenau, where he was forced to assist in the burning of the hundreds of thousands of Hungarian Jews that arrived during the spring and summer of that year.

Gabbai remained at Auschwitz until its evacuation in January 1945. He was liberated from Ebensee concentration camp in Austria by the United States Army, and has publicly spoken about what he witnessed and experienced during the Holocaust.

Why was Dario Gabbai allowed to live, after he had witnessed the gassing of the Jews many times?  The policy of the Nazis was to kill the Sonderkommando Jews, who had witnessed the gassing, after 3 months on the job.  But for some strange reason, the Nazis allowed the last group of Sonderkommando Jews to live; they were marched out of the camp on January 18, 1945 and put on trains to Germany and Austria, where they lived until they were liberated by the American Army.

You can watch the first episode of the documentary on the YouTube video below.  At 1:51 minutes in the video, you can see the entrance into what is supposed to resemble the Krema II, or the Krema III, gas chamber, both of which were 5 feet underground.  At 2:00 minutes, you will hear the voice of Dario Gabbai as he describes what happened to the Jews in the gas chamber; note that he mentions, at 2:13 minutes, that they scratched the walls.  Krema II and Krema III were blown up in January 1945 and the evidence of the scratching in these two gas chambers can no longer be seen. Only the scratching on the walls of the gas chamber in the main Auschwitz camp remains.

Of course, Dario was not in the gas chamber with the Jews as they were dying, but he went into the gas chamber afterwards and carried out the dead bodies to take them up on the elevator to the cremation ovens.  How do we know that Dario, or one of the other Sonderdommando Jews, didn’t put the scratches on the walls?  We just have to trust the testimony of Dario.  Would a Jew lie?

 

November 11, 2012

Kristallnacht marked the beginning of Hitler’s war against the Jews

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust — Tags: , — furtherglory @ 12:08 pm

The title of my blog post today is a quote from an editorial piece written by Rabbi Brad Hirschfield on Fox News.  I previously blogged about the events leading up to Kristallnacht here.

Here is the full quote from Rabbi Brad Hirschfield’s editorial:

Kristallnacht marked the beginning of Hitler’s war against the Jews – his campaign for a “final solution” to the so-called “Jewish problem.” Seventy-four years later, people gather around the world to remember that horrible and fateful night. But how does one remember and commemorate a terrible past when the present is good and the future is looking even better?

What was “the so-called Jewish problem?”

The title of the Wannsee Conference, ordered by Hermann Goering, where the Holocaust was planned, was “The total solution to the Jewish question in Europe.”  According to Goering’s testimony at the Nuremberg IMT, the German word “Die Endlösung” meant “the total solution, not the final solution.”

On the third day of his cross examination of Goering at the Nuremberg IMT, the American prosecutor Robert Jackson questioned him about the treatment of the Jews in Nazi Germany, including the anti-Jewish Nuremberg Laws on Citizenship, which Goering had signed in September 1935.

Then Jackson confronted Goering with the most incriminating piece of evidence in the entire trial: a letter dated July 31, 1941, in which Goering had ordered Reinhard Heydrich, the chief of the Reich Security Main Office (RSHA), to prepare a plan for the “Final solution of the Jewish question.” Goering testified that the German term “Die Endlösung” in the letter should have been translated as the “total solution,” and that it referred only to “the emigration of the Jews,” not the extermination of  the Jews.

“The Jewish Question” was Should the Jews have their own state, or their own state-within-a-state?  Those who were against the Jews having their own state, or their own state within another country, were called anti-Semites because they wanted the Jews to assimilate, instead of having their own state.  Hitler was NOT an anti-Semite.  He did not want the Jews in Europe to assimilate; he wanted them to have their own state.

As the rabbi makes clear in his editorial, the Jews in America have assimilated, so there is no “Jewish problem” in America today.

October 9, 2012

How teachers are trained to present the Holocaust

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust — Tags: , — furtherglory @ 8:00 pm

How does one become qualified to teach Holocaust studies at one of the many Holocaust Museums in America?  This newspaper article describes how one man, Patrick LeBlanc, took a trip to Washington, DC, Israel and Europe to learn how to teach the Holocaust.

This quote is from the article:

Patrick LeBlanc is still processing what he saw and heard last summer when he was sent to Washington, D.C., Israel and Europe to enhance his ability to teach about the Holocaust.

The Clear Lake resident made the journey with the support of Holocaust Museum Houston’s new Lea Krell Weems Fellowship.

“It was a very intense trip,” said LeBlanc, a volunteer docent and teacher at the museum. “But it was good; it was a very enlightening trip.”

LeBlanc, 43, was among educators from around the country who participated in the Holocaust and Jewish Resistance Teachers’ Program this year. The three-week experience is primarily for U.S. secondary school teachers. It was created to deepen teachers’ knowledge and strengthen their ability to implement Holocaust studies.

[…]

The Holocaust & Jewish Resistance Teachers’ Program’s summer trip started this year at the national Holocaust museum in Washington, D.C.

LeBlanc and the other teachers in the group toured the facility and attended a workshop on how to use artifacts to better convey information.  They also heard from Holocaust survivors.  […]

….the group went to Germany, where it visited the Bergen-Belsen, Sachsenhausen and Ravensbrueck concentration camps, along with the Jewish Museum Berlin and the Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe.

For LeBlanc, one of the most affecting sites was a villa outside of Berlin, where Hitler’s cabinet members had met.

“They had already decided on the ‘Final Solution’” LeBlanc said.

“To be at this villa, which is gorgeous, gorgeous villa, and imagine these men sipping brandy and smoking cigars while they planned the murder of an entire people was kind of surreal.”

LeBlanc is right — the Wannsee villa is gorgeous.  I visited the villa several years ago and took the photo below.

The villa where the Wannsee conference was held

But is LeBlanc correct in saying that “They had already decided on The Final Solution”?  (In the official version of the Holocaust, the term Final Solution is defined as the genocide of the Jews.)  When was the genocide of the Jews decided upon and by whom?

At the Nuremberg IMT, Hermann Goering testified that the title of the Conference was “The Total Solution to the Jewish Question in Europe.”  The “Jewish Question” was whether the Jews should assimilate into the country where they lived, or whether they should have their own state-within-a-state.  Hitler wanted the Jews to have their own state.  Read more about the Wannsee Conference here.

Photo of the Wannsee dining room in 1922, twenty years before the Wannsee Conference took place in this room

The full text of the minutes of the Wannsee Conference can be read online here.

This quote is from the minutes, as published online:

Another possible solution of the problem has now taken the place of emigration, i.e. the evacuation of the Jews to the East, provided that the Führer gives the appropriate approval in advance.

[…]

Under proper guidance, in the course of the final solution the Jews are to be allocated for appropriate labor in the East. Able-bodied Jews, separated according to sex, will be taken in large work columns to these areas for work on roads, in the course of which action doubtless a large portion will be eliminated by natural causes.

The possible final remnant will, since it will undoubtedly consist of the most resistant portion, have to be treated accordingly, because it is the product of natural selection and would, if released, act as a the seed of a new Jewish revival (see the experience of history.)

In the course of the practical execution of the final solution, Europe will be combed through from west to east. Germany proper, including the Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia, will have to be handled first due to the housing problem and additional social and political necessities.

The evacuated Jews will first be sent, group by group, to so-called transit ghettos, from which they will be transported to the East.

SS-Obergruppenführer Heydrich went on to say that an important prerequisite for the evacuation as such is the exact definition of the persons involved.

It is not intended to evacuate Jews over 65 years old, but to send them to an old-age ghetto – Theresienstadt is being considered for this purpose.

In addition to these age groups – of the approximately 280,000 Jews in Germany proper and Austria on 31 October 1941, approximately 30% are over 65 years old – severely wounded veterans and Jews with war decorations (Iron Cross I) will be accepted in the old-age ghettos. With this expedient solution, in one fell swoop many interventions will be prevented.

So what the men at the Wannsee Conference discussed was ghettos and transit camps and ultimately, evacuation to the East.  That is exactly what actually happened: Jews were put into Ghettos, then sent to Transit camps, from which they were evacuated to the East.

Note that there was no discussion, during the Conference, about “gas chambers” or “death camps.”  So it seems that there was no discussion of the genocide of the Jews at the Wannsee Conference.

You can read about the Museum in the Wannsee villa on my website here.

January 25, 2012

More Holocaust education needed: one in five young Germans has never heard of Auschwitz

Filed under: Holocaust — Tags: , , , — furtherglory @ 11:20 am

Today, the British newspaper Mail Online is reporting this startling news:

ONE-FIFTH of young Germans have never heard of Auschwitz, survey reveals

Does this mean one-fifth of young “ethnic Germans” (Volksdeutsche) have never heard of Auschwitz, or does it mean one-fifth of all young citizens of Germany have never heard of Auschwitz?

It is hard for me to believe that anyone in Germany has never heard of Auschwitz  — unless they are recent immigrants from Africa or the Middle East.  Did the people asking the survey question pronounce the word Auschwitz correctly? If the surveyers used the British or the American pronunciation of the word, the ethnic Germans might not have known what they were talking about.

According to the article in the Mail Online, “Twenty one per cent of people aged between 18 and 30 quizzed about the most notorious Nazi extermination camp had not heard of it, the survey revealed.”   How was the question posed:  Did the survey people ask “What was the most notorious Nazi extermination camp?”

This quote is from the article:

The Nazis built six extermination camps – Auschwitz, Chelmno, Belzec, Sobibor, Treblinka and Majdanek – all of them in occupied Poland.The murder of prisoners, most of them Jewish, began in 1941 when Nazi officials enacted Hitler’s ‘Final Solution of the Jewish Question’.

The “Final Solution of the Jewish Question” was enacted in 1941?  Does that mean “enacted into law?”  NO, NO, NO! There was no German law in which the murder of the Jews was ordered. The murder of the Jews did, in fact, begin in 1941, but the Wannsee conference where the “Final Solution of the Jewish Question” was discussed did not begin until January 20, 1942.  So the murder of the Jews was not ordered at the Wannsee conference.

Auschwitz was not in occupied Poland when the camp was in operation, as stated in the Mail Online article.  It was in the Greater German Reich.  So was Chelmno.

Chelmno was located in the Warthegau, a district in the part of Poland that had been annexed into the Greater German Reich after the joint conquest of Poland by Germany and the Soviet Union in 1939.

This quote is also from the article in the Mail Online:

The survey, published in Stern magazine, showed that of people over 30, 95 per cent had heard of Auschwitz and the crimes committed there.

But less than 70 per cent could name the country it lies in.

Auschwitz is in Silesia which was also annexed into the Greater German Reich in 1939.  Silesia was given to Poland after World War I, in the Treaty of Versailles.  After the conquest of Poland in 1939, Germany took back Silesia.  Maybe 70 per cent of the Germans who were surveyed do not believe that Silesia should belong to Poland.  Or maybe they were answering the question with the name of the country that Auschwitz was in when the camp was in operation.

I’m guessing that the reason the survey found that one out of five young Germans had never heard of Auschwitz is because one out of five Germans are afraid to speak about the Holocaust, for fear that they will get a notice in the mail that they have to pay a fine for breaking the German law against Holocaust denial.  It has been my experience, in visiting Germany many times, that Germans of all ages are afraid to speak about the Holocaust.

I think that this survey might have been flawed by the survey takers not asking the questions in the right way.

I have found that, when talking to German people, one must be very precise.  For example, if you ask for a ticket to Frankfurt, you will hear “Which one?”  Don’t go to Berlin unless you know how to pronounce the name of the city.  If you want to go to Rothenburg, you must specify Rothenburg ob der Tauber.  There are special places in Germany where Americans, who can’t pronounce Dachau correctly, can buy their tickets without being frowned upon for not knowing how to speak properly.