Scrapbookpages Blog

July 1, 2017

Brundibar

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust, Music, Uncategorized — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 5:10 pm

Here is a short one minute clip from a rendition of Brundibar.

You can read a news article I blogged about earlier today about the concentration camp in the town of Terezin at: http://www.cjnews.com/culture/entertainment/arts/opera-returns-death-camp

This is the headline of the news article:

The Opera returns to the death camp

Begin quote from the news article:

For John Freund, this performance of an opera he loves promises to be bittersweet.

The 87-year-old Holocaust survivor, who now lives in Toronto, hopes to be well enough to travel this month to Theresienstadt – a concentration camp and ghetto in the Czech town of Terezin, near Prague, where he was once interned. There, he will see a performance of the renowned children’s opera, Brundibar, which he witnessed as a teenaged inmate of the Nazi-era camp.

Freund served as a consultant to the Canadian Children’s Opera Company, which, on July 2, began a 10-day tour of Brundibar. The company of 48 children and youth are to perform the work in Prague, where it premiered at an orphanage in 1942, as well as Krakow and Budapest. The tour ends in Terezin, where the opera was performed more than 50 times by the child inmates of the camp.

End quote from news article

============================================

The Red Cross inspection of the Terezin concentration camp lasted for six hours but the cultural events went on for a week. During the week of the inspection, there were numerous performances of the children’s opera called “Brundibar” in the new cultural hall in the Sokol building.

A jazz band, called the “Ghetto Swingers”, played in the music pavilion in the square. This was a real concession by the Nazis since they had banned jazz or swing music in all of Germany. Hitler regarded swing music and jazz as “degenerate” because two of the leading musicians, Benny Goodman and Artie Shaw, were Jewish.

The Nazi concentration camps typically had an orchestra which played classical music as the prisoners marched to work, or to the gas chambers. The Germans loved classical music and Germany was world famous for the cultural contributions of Beethoven, Bach and Brahms. One could say that the Nazis literally put down their violins in order to kill the Jews.

 

 

Brundibar, the opera, will play again at a former Nazi “death camp”

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust, Uncategorized — Tags: , , , — furtherglory @ 3:03 pm

My photo of entrance into Theresienstadt

You can read all about the alleged Nazi death camp, known as Theresienstadt, in this recent news article: http://www.cjnews.com/culture/entertainment/arts/opera-returns-death-camp

Title of the article: The Opera returns to the death camp

WEb-Brundibar-640x589.gif

Quote from the news article:

For John Freund, [a former prisoner at Theresienstadt] this performance of an opera he loves promises to be bittersweet.

The 87-year-old Holocaust survivor, who now lives in Toronto, hopes to be well enough to travel this month to Theresienstadt – a concentration camp and ghetto in the Czech town of Terezin, near Prague, where he was once interned. There, he will see a performance of the renowned children’s opera, Brundibar, which he witnessed as a teenaged inmate of the Nazi-era camp.

Freund served as a consultant to the Canadian Children’s Opera Company, which, on July 2, began a 10-day tour of Brundibar. The company of 48 children and youth are to perform the work in Prague, where it premiered at an orphanage in 1942, as well as Krakow and Budapest. The tour ends in Terezin, [rhymes with gasoline] where the opera was performed more than 50 times by the child inmates of the camp.

End quote from news article

I have a section on my website about Theresienstadt at:

http://www.scrapbookpages.com/CzechRepublic/Theresienstadt/TheresienstadtGhetto/History/index.html

The following quote is from my website:

The Red Cross inspection of the Theresienstadt camp lasted for six hours but the cultural events at Theresienstadt went on for a week. During the week of the inspection, there were numerous performances of the children’s opera called Brundibar in the new cultural hall in the Sokol building.

A jazz band, called the Ghetto Swingers, played in the music pavilion in the square. This was a real concession by the Nazis since they had banned jazz or swing music in Germany. Hitler regarded swing as “degenerate” music because two of the leading musicians, Benny Goodman and Artie Shaw, were Jewish.

The Nazi concentration camps typically had an orchestra which played classical music as the prisoners marched to work or to the gas chambers. The Germans loved classical music and Germany was world famous for the cultural contributions of Beethoven, Bach and Brahms. One could say that the Nazis literally put down their violins in order to kill the Jews.

End quote from my website

 

June 1, 2017

Butterflies and the Holocaust

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust — Tags: , , , , — furtherglory @ 12:57 pm

This morning I read a news article which mentions the role of butterflies in the Holocaust: http://www.newjerseyhills.com/echoes-sentinel/news/a-poignant-and-powerful-holocaust-lesson-for-warren-township-schools/article_52586d43-4677-5546-afe6-2c512fafe6b5.html

The following quote is from the news article:

Begin quote

Czechoslovakian teenager Alena Synkova penned the poem, “I’d Like to Go Alone,” while confined at the Terezin (Theresienstadt) concentration camp, a ghetto in the hills outside of Prague that was home to 15,000 children between 1942-1944.

Synkova was one of fewer than 100 children who passed through Terezin to survive the Nazi genocide. Her poignant poem and other drawings and poems created by the children of Terezin are compiled and preserved in “I Never Saw Another Butterfly”, first published in 1959 for the State Jewish Museum in Prague and later published in the United States in cooperation with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C.

Using a grant she received three years ago to support Holocaust education, Central School Reach teacher Jill Zimmer purchased a classroom set of “I Never Saw a Butterfly” and, working with Grade 5 teacher Jennifer SanAntonio, the two came up with a powerful fifth grade language arts unit.

End quote

I wrote about this in a previous blog post which you can read at https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2011/06/10/there-is-a-hitler-in-every-human-being/

The following quote is from the blog post, cited above:

When I visited the Memorial Site at the former Majdanek camp, I was surprised to see all the artwork on display; there were sculptures and lots of other artwork that had been done by the prisoners in the camp. I remember a rosary that had been fashioned out of bits of bread that had been wadded up and left to dry to make the beads. I did not see the butterfly pictures, but perhaps they had been taken to another Holocaust Museum in America or Israel for display.

The children in the Theresienstadt (Terezin) concentration camp were allowed to do artwork and they were even given lessons in drawing and painting by an adult teacher. Some of their pictures were on display at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, DC when I visited there years ago.

But to get back to the “Nazi monsters.” Hitler was an artist himself. Is that why he allowed the children to draw or paint butterflies before they were killed in the gas chamber? Hitler may have thought that he was being kind to the innocent children by allowing them to paint butterflies before dying, but I think this was unnecessarily cruel. It gave the children hope, when there was none.

End quote

February 5, 2017

Jews who wrote songs at Theresienstadt were gassed at Auschswitz

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust, Music — Tags: , , , — furtherglory @ 8:40 am

Yes, it’s true, dear readers. Jews were allowed to compose music at Theresienstadt, but were then taken to Auschwitz and killed in the gas chamber.

Obviously, the Nazis wanted to steal music from the Jews before killing them. As everyone knows, the Germans can’t carry a tune in a basket!

You can read about this terrible crime in this news article: http://www.poconorecord.com/entertainmentlife/20170204/work-by-jewish-holocaust-victims-lives-on-in-ute-lempers-songs-for-eternity

The following quote is from the news article:

Begin quote

A lot of work [by Jewish composers] actually was written at Theresienstadt, and there are a bunch of songs that are out of this history of this specific camp, but all of those were works written by artists who, in ’44, were brought on the trains to Auschwitz, and all of them were gassed. There was a quite incredible repertoire [of music] out of this concentration camp.

End quote

You can’t get any more cruel than that: the Nazis allowed the Jews to compose music, while they were prisoners in a ghetto, and then they killed them in gas chambers. Oh, the humanity!

The following quote is also from the news article:

Begin quote

Not only does every song have a story, every composer has a story. There’s Ilse Weber, a poet, writer and composer in the Prague ghetto who was brought to Theresienstadt and then brought with her entire family to Auschwitz later on and was killed, but her husband survived, and he was able to hide scrolls of her music in the columns of the horse stables of Theresienstadt. After being liberated from Auschwitz, he made it back to Theresienstadt to look for those scrolls, and he found them and published them many years later.

End quote

My photo below shows the horse stable at Theresienstadt

Terezin02.jpeg

On my scrapbookpages.com website, I have a large section about Theresienstadt: http://www.scrapbookpages.com/CzechRepublic/Theresienstadt/TheresienstadtGhetto/index.html

To learn all about Theresienstadt, start with this section on my website: http://www.scrapbookpages.com/CzechRepublic/Theresienstadt/TheresienstadtGhetto/History/index.html

The following quote is also from the news article:

Begin quote:

…. an amazing story about Ilse Weber that really was breathtaking and horrible to tell. She became a nurse at Theresienstadt in charge of the children. She brought them with her on the train to Auschwitz, and she knew for some reason when they arrived they would all be brought straight to the gas chambers.

She told the children once they entered the gas chambers to sing. Because she had always sung with the children. That was always her way of making them feel better. She told them to breathe in deep and sing loud once they would enter the shower rooms, because she knew it would initiate death faster through deep inhalation, so the struggle would not be so long. It’s just so horrible.

End quote

How fortunate that this woman knew all abut the gas chambers! Why didn’t those stupid Nazis keep the gas chambers a secret?

I visited Theresienstadt for the second time in the year 2000 and took photos which you can see here: http://www.scrapbookpages.com/CzechRepublic/Theresienstadt/TheresienstadtGhetto/GhettoTour/Tour05.html

November 26, 2016

The Jew who was sent to a labor camp called Theresienstadt

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust — Tags: , — furtherglory @ 11:56 am

Was Theresienstadt really a labor camp?

According to this news article, it was.

Strictly’s Judge Rinder opens up about his Jewish grandfather’s horrifying experience during the Holocaust

The prison camp at Theresienstadt

The caption of this photo says “Moishe [a Jewish prisoner] was sent to a series of labour camps, including Theresienstadt in what was then Czechoslovakia”

Excuse me! I don’t think that Theresienstadt was classified as a “labor camp.” The photo above appears to have been taken in “the small camp” which was a prison at Theresienstadt.

I have a similar photo on my website, which you can see below:

The prison camp at Theresienstadt

My photo of the prison camp at Theresienstadt

My photo above seems to show the same prison camp that is shown in the photo in the news article.

I have written at length about Theresienstadt on my web site. I have a whole section devoted to Theresienstadt, which you can read at http://www.scrapbookpages.com/CzechRepublic/Theresienstadt/TheresienstadtGhetto/History/index.html

Start by reading my web page about the history of Theresienstadt at http://www.scrapbookpages.com/CzechRepublic/Theresienstadt/TheresienstadtGhetto/History/GhettoHistory.html

November 22, 2016

Voices of Terezin — rhymes with gasoline

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust, Uncategorized — Tags: , , , — furtherglory @ 1:30 pm

Gate into the Theresienstadt ghetto

Gate into the Theresienstadt [Terezin] ghetto where Jews were held

You can read about Terezin [Theresienstadt] in this recent news article: http://nhpr.org/post/112116-voices-terezin-vegan-schism-nfl-ratings

Begin quote from the news article:

Today, voices of Terezin, [Theresienstadt] the Nazi concentration camp [are] used to divert attention from the final solution. We’ll hear about how prisoners held under brutal conditions created art and music amid the horrors of the holocaust.

Plus, what happens when a protest movement professing all-or-nothing absolutism splits in two? We’ll find out how a splinter group of vegan activists toned down their goals and built a powerful machine for change.

End quote

The following information about Theresienstadt [Terezin] is from my scrapbookpages.com website:

The word “ghetto” derives from the name of an area of the city of Venice where the city’s foundries were located. In the Venetian dialect, a foundry was known as a “geto” which meant a workshop or a factory. The word “geto” was derived from the verb “gettare” which means “to cast” as in to cast iron in a foundry.

After the Jews were expelled from Spain in 1492 and from Portugal in 1497, many of them settled in Venice. In 1516, a city decree forced the Jews of Venice to live on a small island with only two access points which were sealed off at sunset. This island had previously been the area of the “gheto nuovo” or new workshops.

However, even before the word ghetto came into use, the Jews, particularly in Poland, were confined to walled sections of the city where they lived. In 1492, the Jews of Krakow in Poland were put into a walled-off section after they were accused of setting fires in the city.

There were no walled Jewish ghettos in the Old Reich, as Germany proper was called, during Hitler’s regime. Hitler sent the German Jews to the Lodz ghetto, located in what had formerly been Poland or to Theresienstadt, located in what was formerly the country of Czechoslovakia.

After the Nazis invaded Poland and then occupied the country, they initially put the Polish Jews into ghettos, using the excuse that had been used for centuries, that the Jews were responsible for spreading disease. Later, these ghettos became a convenient way to concentrate the Jews in one location for eventual transport to the concentration camps for extermination in Hitler’s “Final Solution to the Jewish Question.”

On October 10, 1941, the Germans initially decided to make Theresienstadt into a ghetto for selected Jews in the German Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia, and in the Greater German Reich, which included Austria and part of western Poland.

The Jews, who were to be sent to Theresienstadt, included those over 60 years old, World War I veterans, prominent people such as artists or musicians, very important persons, the blind, the deaf, and the inmates of Jewish mental hospitals and the Jewish orphanages.

Read more on my website at http://www.scrapbookpages.com/CzechRepublic/Theresienstadt/TheresienstadtGhetto/History/GhettoHistory.html

 

 

 

May 14, 2016

How could I have been so wrong about Theresienstadt?

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust — Tags: , , , — furtherglory @ 1:44 pm
Gate into the former Theresienstdt ghetto

Gate into the former Theresienstadt ghetto

The wall around Theresienstadt

The wall around Theresienstadt fort, the site of the ghetto where Jews were imprisoned

Today I read a news story at http://www.newspostleader.co.uk/news/local/holocaust-horrors-brought-to-life-for-students-1-7907002#ixzz48f2Zrchi

The following quote is from the news article, cited above:

Begin quote:

History students at Blyth’s Bede Academy heard the first hand account from Joanna Millan, a grandmother who spent two years in a concentration camp at Theresianstadt, [Theresienstadt] near Prague.

Less than 100 children out of 15,000 deported there survived, with Joanna just three-years-old when she came to England in August, 1945.

End quote

Several years ago, I visited the Theresienstadt ghetto on two separate days.  I took a tour bus there and walked around the former camp, which is still a town in the Czech Republic, where non-Jews now live.

After my extensive visit, I wrote the following about Theresienstadt on my website:

The total number of Jews transported from their homes to the Theresienstadt ghetto, from the day that it opened on November 24, 1941 until April 20, 1945, was 139,654, according to a 1991 book called “The Terezin Ghetto” by Ludmila Chladkova, which I purchased from the Theresienstadt Museum. Out of the total who were originally deported to Theresienstadt, there were 33,430 persons who died in the ghetto. There were 207 babies born in the camp, despite the fact that the men and women were housed in separate barracks.

There were also 13,454 persons who arrived at the ghetto after April 20, after being evacuated by the Nazis from other concentration camps that had to be closed before the Soviet Army arrived.

In the first week of May 1945, the Nazis turned the camp over to the Red Cross, and the SS staff left the camp on May 5, 1945. At that time, there were 16,832 of the original 139,654 who had been deported to Theresienstadt that were still alive and living in the ghetto. The book by Ludmila Chladkova, which is sold at the Theresienstadt Museum, has no explanation for the discrepancy between this number of 16,832 and the number of survivors which her book says was 17,472.

About half of these 16,832 prisoners, or 8,565 persons, had arrived in Theresienstadt after October 28, 1944, so they had been in the ghetto for only seven months or less. The last transport out of the ghetto left on October 28, 1944.

The majority of the Jews sent directly to Theresienstadt were from the German protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia which is now the Czech Republic and from Slovakia which became an independent country when Czechoslovakia ceased to exist in 1939. There were 75,666 Czech and Slovak Jews sent to Theresienstadt and 8,542 of them were still alive in the ghetto when the Red Cross took over in the first week of May, 1945. From Germany, there were 42,104 Jews transported to Theresienstadt, and 5,221 were still alive in the ghetto on May 9, 1945. There were 15,253 Austrian Jews, most of them over 60 years old, who were sent to the ghetto but only 1,293 of them were still there on May 9, 1945. The total number of Jews deported to Theresienstadt from the Netherlands was 4,897, out of which 1,285 were still alive in the camp on May 9, 1945.

The deportation of the Hungarian Jews did not begin until the end of April 1944 and 1,150 of them were sent to Theresienstadt. Because of the short length of their stay in the ghetto, there were 1,138 still there on May 9, 1945.

There were 117 Jews sent to Theresienstadt from Gdansk, which was the former German port city of Danzig that was made into an international port under the control of Poland after World War I, and 11 of them were still there at the end.

According to the book “The Terezin Ghetto” by Ludmila Chladkova, the 466 Danish Jews who were sent to Theresienstadt were all sent back to Denmark by the Nazis on April 15, 1945, shortly before the ghetto was handed over to the Red Cross. Other sources give the number of Danish Jews sent to Theresienstadt as 481, 475, 456 and 464. No two web sites or books agree on the number of Danish Jews sent to Theresienstadt or the number who returned to Denmark. Other sources give various numbers for the Danish Jews who died at Theresienstadt: 31, 43, 51, 52, 53, 58 and 116.

Not counting the Danish Jews, there were 17,472 survivors of the 139,654 Jews originally sent to the ghetto who were still there when the Russian army arrived on May 8, 1945, according to Ludmila Chladkova.

Out of the 139,654 Jews who were originally deported to Theresienstadt, 86,934 were subsequently transported to the east to various concentration camps, not counting the 1,260 children from Bialystok in eastern Poland.

According to Martin Gilbert in his book “Holocaust Journey,” the Bialystok children were survivors from the Bialystok ghetto. They arrived in Theresienstadt on August 24, 1943 and on October 5, 1943 they were sent out of the camp, along with 53 volunteer doctors, nurses and attendants. According to Gilbert, the Nazis claimed that these children were going to be exchanged in neutral Switzerland for German POWs held by the Allies, but instead “they were taken to Auschwitz and murdered.” These children were not counted in the official Nazi records of those who were transported to the east.

In addition, there were 1,623 Jews from Theresienstadt who were sent, before the end of the war, to the neutral countries of Switzerland and Sweden with the help of the Red Cross. Out of the 86,934 Jews who were sent farther east, there were 3,097 who returned to their home countries.

There were 701 Jews who managed to escape from Theresienstadt and 336 others who violated the rules of the ghetto and consequently were sent to the Gestapo prison in the Small Fortress across the river. Those who served their time in the Small Fortress, and survived, were later sent to concentration camps in the east.

When the concentration camps in the East closed, because the Russians were advancing into Poland during the last months of the war, all the inmates who could walk were marched to Germany and crowded into the camps there. This caused a disaster in Germany because they brought the typhus epidemic with them from Poland. In the last three weeks of the war, there were 13,454 prisoners from the concentration camps in the east who were admitted into the Theresienstadt ghetto, and the typhus epidemic spread to Theresienstadt.

According to the Ghetto Museum, a total of 34,396 prisoners died in Ghetto Theresienstadt including 966 who had just arrived from the camps in the east after April 20, 1945. When the war ended on May 8, 1945, the total number of people in the ghetto was 29,320 which included the survivors from the eastern camps who had arrived in the last weeks of the war and the 16,832 survivors of the original transports.

End of information from my website

O.K. it is time to go to Wikipedia, the website that knows all: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theresienstadt_concentration_camp

Wikipedia is strictly a kosher website, where no Holocaust denial is allowed.

Begin quote from Wikipedia:

Approximately 144,000 Jews were sent to Theresienstadt. Most inmates were Czech Jews, but 40,000 were from Germany, 15,000 from Austria, 5,000 from the Netherlands, and 300 from Luxembourg. In addition to the group of approximately 500 Jews from Denmark, Slovak and Hungarian Jews were deported to the ghetto. 1,600 Jewish children from Białystok, Poland, were deported from Theresienstadt to Auschwitz; none survived. About a quarter of the inmates (33,000) died in Theresienstadt, mostly because of the deadly conditions, which included hunger, stress, and disease. The typhus epidemic at the very end of war took an especially heavy toll.

About 88,000 prisoners were deported to Auschwitz and other extermination camps, including Treblinka. At the end of the war, 17,247 had survived. An estimated 15,000 children lived in the ghetto. Willy Groag, one of the youth care workers, mistakenly claimed after the war that only 93 survived.[33] However, 242 children younger than 15 survived deportation to camps in the East, and 1,566 children survived in the ghetto proper.[citation needed]

End quote

I wrote about the Bialystok children on my blog at: https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2011/03/26/the-fate-of-the-bialystok-ghetto-children-who-were-sent-to-theresienstadt/

 

 

April 8, 2016

Terezin (also known by its German name, Theresienstadt)

Filed under: Holocaust — Tags: , , , , , — furtherglory @ 9:02 am
My photo of the Gazebo at Theresienstadt

My photo of the Gazebo at Terezin, formerly known as Theresienstadt

The two photos below show the Magdeburg barracks and the inner court yard of the building. Wolf Murmelstein, a former inmate at Theresienstadt says that the Gazebo, shown above, was not accessible to the inmates.

MagdeburgRear

MagdeburgCourtyard

The title of my blog post today comes from a line in a news article which you can read it full at http://artsbeat.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/04/04/holocaust-survivor-recalls-brundibar-a-childrens-opera/?_r=0

The following quote is from the news article, cited above:

Dagmar Lieblova was 14 in 1943, when she sang in the children’s opera “Brundibar” at the Terezin [Theresienstadt] concentration camp near Prague. The performance was part of a Nazi effort to present the camp as a model ghetto rather than a transit point to Auschwitz and the gas chambers.

What am I complaining about now, you ask.

I don’t like the fact that German names for Holocaust locations are now being changed to Jewish or Polish names.  The ghetto, formerly known as Theresienstadt, is now called Terezin.  The town, formerly known as Auschwitz, is now called by the Polish name Oświęcim.

The following quote is from the news article, cited above:

The composer of “Brundibar,” Hans Krasa, died at Auschwitz, alongside most of those who performed it in Terezin (also known by its German name, Theresienstadt). Ms. Lieblova lost her parents and sister in Auschwitz, but she was spared when she was sent to Hamburg to help clear the ruins of the city.

So it seems that the Allied bombing of the city of Hamburg did save some of the Jews at Auschwitz because the Germans needed workers to clear the rubble in their cities. The Nazis allegedly stopped gassing all the prisoners at Auschwitz, saving a few, because they needed workers.

You can read more about Theresienstadt on my website here:

http://www.scrapbookpages.com/CzechRepublic/Theresienstadt/TheresienstadtGhetto/GhettoTour/index.html

The following quote is from my scrapbookpages.com website:

Every concentration camp had its orchestra, made up of inmate musicians, and concerts were staged even in the worst camp of all, the one at Birkenau, the Auschwitz II camp. Typically, the camp orchestra would play classical music as the prisoners marched off the the factories to work and even as they marched to their deaths in the gas chamber. During the week of cultural events [at Theresienstadt] in June 1944, on the occasion of the Red Cross visit, there were performances of Brundibar in the Magdeburg building.

 

 

 

March 21, 2016

Holocaust survivor says that her brother was gassed on the 8th of March in 1944

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust, World War II — Tags: , , , , — furtherglory @ 9:24 am

As every student of the Holocaust knows, the Nazis did not keep records of the prisoners that were gassed at Auschwitz-Birkenau, nor at any other death camp.

My photo of the ruins of gas chamber at Auschwitz-Birkenau

My photo of the ruins of gas chamber number 3 at Auschwitz-Birkenau

A news article, which you can read in full here, reports that Holocaust survivor Liselotte Ivry said that

“her brother, Hans, was taken to the [Auschwitz-Birkenau] gas chamber on March 8 [1944] .”

Jews arriving at Auschwitz Birkenau

Jews arriving on a train at Auschwitz-Birkenau in 1944

The gas chambers at Auschwitz-Birkenau were very close to the train tracks where the Jews arrived in 1944.

The following quote is from the news article, cited above:

Begin quote

Her mother, weakened and ill, perished in Auschwitz on Jan. 4, 1944; her brother, Hans, was taken to the gas chamber on March 8 [1944]. When she [Lisolette] saw him the day before [he was gassed] and offered him her mittens, he replied: “Where I am going, you don’t need mittens,” Ivry recalled in testimony about her Holocaust experience for the University of Southern California Shoah Foundation.

End quote

What did Lisolette’s brother mean when he said “Where I am going, you don’t need mittens.”  Did he mean that he was going to Hell because he was lying? I was told, years ago, by a Jewish friend, that Jews don’t believe in Heaven and Hell.

The following quote is from the news article, cited above:

Begin quote

Ivry was born Liselotte Epstein in 1925 in Listany, a small village in what is now the Czech Republic. Her father died when she was 3½, and she and her younger brother were raised by their mother, who ran a general store. She remembers an idyllic childhood of picking berries, playing soccer, sleigh riding in winter and swimming in summer with the geese and ducks in the pond in front of the house.

But that idyll would end all to soon. On Oct. 1, 1938, Adolf Hitler and the armies of Nazi Germany crossed into the Sudetenland, in western Czechoslovakia. By month’s end, the family was living with relatives in Prague. The following March, the Germans walked into Prague “and we were not allowed to go to school after that,” Ivry recalled. In time, Jews were not permitted in parks or movie houses or even on the sidewalk; they could shop only at certain hours. “Every day there was something new.”

The roundups of Jews began; in September 1942, Ivry’s family was sent to the concentration camp of Terezin [Theresienstadt], north of Prague; from there, to the Auschwitz-Birkenau extermination camp in Nazi-occupied Poland.

End quote

According to Wolf Murmelstein, who often comments on my blog, there was a gas chamber at Terezin, the camp formerly known as Theresienstadt. So why was Hans Ivry sent to Auschwitz-Birkenau in 1944 to be gassed?

As every student of the Holohoax knows, the Nazis never did anything the right way.  If Hans had been gassed at Theresienstadt, there would have been no record of it, and his sister would never have known what happened to him.

 

February 1, 2016

The Theresienstadt gas chamber — the story that won’t die

Filed under: Holocaust — Tags: , , , — furtherglory @ 8:43 am
Theresienstadt ghetto were Jews were confined in World War II

An old building in the Theresienstadt ghetto where Jews were confined during World War II

I am taking a comment, made by Wolf Murmelstein, out of the comment section of my blog and making it public in my new blog post today. As I write this, I recall that I previously posted this same comment.  I am posting it again because there are many new readers of my blog, who might like to weigh in on this subject.

The alleged gas chamber at Theresienstadt was located near this spot

The alleged gas chamber at Theresienstadt was located near this gate into the camp

The following article was written in a recent comment made by Wolf Murmelstein, the son of Benjamin Murmelstein, the last Jewish Elder at Theresienstadt:

How the things went on is clearly exposed in my Father’s Book. THERESIENSTADT, EICHMANN’S MUSTERGHETTO which cannot find any USA publisher due to the interests of the Shoah Business as proved by the circulation of this tale.
At any rate, I will summarize the real story:
1. In January, an order came to start works for an adaption of a room in the fort walls and for a wall enclosing a place in the moat surrounding the town but only following oral instructions without any written design.
2. Going on with the work, the engineer alarmed the Elder [Benjamin Murmelstein] who too found it strange as, furthermore, not being called to accompany certain visitors who came to control those works.
3. A group [of prisoners], arriving from Slovakia at  the end of December 1944, had the first alarming information.
4. At a certain moment, the Elder Murmelstein, after having given instructions for the events of his arrest, faced the Commander who spoke about a bombsafe warehouse and a lake for growing ducks. But next day the Commander suddenly left for Prague and returned after three days with the order to stop those works. The only one having authority to give such an order had been SS General and Governor of the Protectorate Karl Hermann Frank.
5. Little Fortress Commander Heinrich Joecke admitted that the Gas Chamber had been aimed for the liquidation o the political prisoners, adding wrongly that Zyklon B had been available. The so called lake in the moat had been aimed as a place for a mass shooting of all Ghetto inmates.

6. Ghetto Commander Karl Rahm in his trial strangely did not show how he had obtained the order to stop the works, holding the version of the Bombsafe Warehouse and the lake for growing ducks, renouncing so as to plea for a prison sentence. One can conjecture that he had been afraid of disclosing the real envolvment of some one able to escape his former “comrades”  who would take revenge on his family at Vienna.
At any rate, things had been made certain in a proper court – Litomerice, Czech Republic – where files can be controlled.
Should such a tale have been put into circulation here in Italy, I would address the State Attorney to investigate whether there had been simple fraud – when asking to buy tickets to follow a speech – or heavy fraud – when sponsored by public pecuniary aid. And in the USA?

I have previously blogged about this in these blog posts:

https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/tag/theresienstadt-gas-chamber

https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2013/05/18/the-plan-to-gas-all-the-jews-at-theresienstadt-or-if-that-wasnt-enough-to-drown-them

https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2015/11/14/the-plan-to-gas-the-prisoners-at-theresienstadt-near-the-end-of-world-war-ii

 

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