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May 6, 2012

How to make Chinese turtle soup for medicinal purposes

Filed under: Health — Tags: , — furtherglory @ 12:42 pm

Turtle soup is highly recommended by Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) as the best possible medicine to revive failing kidneys.  The kidneys control every organ in the body, especially the heart and the pancreas.  Weak kidneys can cause high blood pressure, rapid heart rate, and Type II diabetes.   When your kidneys are completely failing, you have two choices:  turtle soup or a kidney transplant.

To make turtle soup, you will need a huge stainless steel pot, big enough to hold a ceramic pot placed inside it. You can buy these pots at a Chinese market.  In Sacramento, CA you can buy the pots, along with all the ingredients for the soup, including a live turtle, at Welco Supermarket. The clerk at the market will chop the live turtle into pieces with a huge cleaver, and then package it up so that you don’t have to look at it.

It will take a minimum of two days to prepare and cook the soup.  First, you start by making a broth from a whole chicken and some Chinese herbs. You will need a third pot for the broth.  The chicken and the herbs must cook for a minimum of 8 hours.  Then you put the turtle, shell and all, inside the ceramic pot and cover the turtle with the chicken broth.

Place the ceramic pot, filled with the turtle and the broth, inside the stainless steel pot and fill the stainless steel pot up to within one inch of the top of the ceramic pot.  The turtle soup must cook for a minimum of 12 hours, but longer cooking is better.  After a few hours of cooking, you can remove the ceramic pot and place the turtle soup inside your refrigerator, then continue cooking it the next day, if you do not want to stay up all night watching the soup.

Recipe for Turtle Soup

Make a broth from these ingredients:

1.  One ounce Dioscorea (Shen Yao)

2.  One and a half ounces Radix Astragali (Huang Qi)

3.  One and a half ounces Codonopsis Pilosula (Dang Shen)

4.  One half ounce Medlar (Qi Zhi)

5.  8 dried Chinese dates

6.  One whole (dead) chicken with the feathers and feet removed. Include the liver, heart, gizzard and neck in the broth.

When the broth is done, remove the chicken meat and the bones, but not the herbs.

Put the chopped up turtle (including the shell) into the ceramic pot and fill the pot, up to one inch from the top, with the chicken broth.

Place a towel or some chop sticks on the bottom of the stainless steel pot so that the ceramic pot does not touch the bottom of the stainless steel pot.

Pour water into the stainless steel pot, and allow the soup to simmer inside the ceramic pot for 12 hours at least. Do not allow the water in the stainless steel pot to get into the ceramic pot, which has a small hole in the lid.  Cover the stainless steel pot with a tight-fitting lid and allow the soup to simmer for up to 7 days.

To serve the soup, remove the pieces of turtle shell.  You may also remove the turtle meat.  You do not have to eat the turtle meat, as all of the medicinal properties will be in the broth. The amount of broth that you are required to drink depends on how much you boil it down.  Normally, about 12 ounces of broth will be enough to have a good effect on your kidneys.

Turtle soup can be eaten once a month until your kidneys recover.  For people who don’t have weak kidneys, the soup can be eaten once a year to maintain good health.

How will you know if your kidneys have improved, after you have eaten the soup?  A TCM doctor can tell you how well your kidneys are working.  When your kidneys are working the way they should, you will have not have to get up at night to go to the bathroom, and you will have no tell-tale symptoms of failing kidneys, like dry mouth.  You will have renewed energy and your blood pressure, and blood sugar, will be normal.

October 25, 2011

Forsythia mentioned in new movie “Contagion”

Filed under: Health — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 4:06 pm

I went to see the new movie “Contagion” today.  It was a bit boring until I heard the word Forsythia, which caused me to perk up and pay attention. Unless you are an avid gardener, you have probably never heard of Forsythia which is a tall bush which blooms with yellow flowers in the early spring.  You see a lot of it along the roadside in Germany.

In the movie, the word Forsythia is used in connection with homeopathic medicine.  What was not mentioned in the movie is that Forsythia is used in Traditional Chinese Medicine.

Here is a quote about the medicinal use of Forsythia from this website:

Uses of Forsythia
Forsythia has been used for treatment of bacterial infections and upper respiratory tract infections, although the clinical evidence supporting its use is limited.

History
Forsythia fruits are widely used in Chinese traditional medicine for antipyretic and anti-inflammatory activity in the treatment of bacterial infections and upper respiratory ailments. They are commonly combined with honeysuckle flower  (Lonicera ) and other ingredients. Forsythia fruits are also reputedly used as a diuretic and as a cardiovascular tonic.

August 5, 2011

Can Traditional Chinese Medicine help people with Type I diabetes?

Filed under: Health — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 9:19 am

Yesterday, I went to my TCM doctor to have acupuncture and get a refill on herb pills for the kidneys.  I was very pleased to learn that my “kidney pulse” is now very strong and all the damage done by a stroke that I had just over a year ago has now been reversed. The doctor told me that the “window of opportunity” for reversing stroke damage is 6 months; thank God I made use of that 6-month “window of opportunity.”

I took my daughter, who is 30 years younger, along with me for her first acupuncture treatment and a diagnosis of the condition of her heart and kidneys.  She was shocked to hear that I have a better heart and better kidneys than she does.

This time I questioned my doctor on the effectiveness of Traditional Chinese Medicine.  I asked him if TCM could do anything for a 23-year-old friend of mine who has had Type I diabetes since she was 3 years old and has now been told by her Western doctor that she has “failing kidneys.”  The first thing that my TCM doctor said was “Is she on dialysis yet?”  When I told him that she was not that far gone yet, the doctor said that acupuncture and Chinese herbs can positively help “kidney deficiency” in Type I diabetes patients.  (more…)

July 21, 2011

Dr. Oz on how to keep your kidneys working…

Filed under: Health — Tags: , , , , — furtherglory @ 10:06 am

Yesterday, on the Dr. Oz TV show, the subject was how to prevent or cure cancer, but more importantly, there was a segment on how to take care of your kidneys.

According to Dr. Oz, there are two things that can damage your kidneys:  high blood pressure and diabetes.  I have been going to a Traditional Chinese Medicine doctor since I had a stroke over a year ago.  According to TCM theory, it is the other way around:  weak kidneys CAUSE high blood pressure and weak kidneys are also the CAUSE of diabetes.

So how do you know if you have weak kidneys?  Your first clue is having to go to the bathroom to urinate at night.  According to my TCM doctor, this means that your kidneys are so weak that they must work overtime to eliminate the toxins in your body; normal kidneys rest at night.  Another clue is having white space showing under the pupils of your eyes, which means that you have toxins in your body that are not being removed by the kidneys.  Also, having swollen ankles, caused by retaining water, means that your kidneys are not working to eliminate the water. And when your kidneys are really weak, you will feel exhausted all the time.

Dr. Oz mentioned some natural remedies to strengthen the kidneys and lower blood sugar:  Hibiscus tea, Gumar Extract and herbs.  He didn’t identify the herbs which were in liquid form in a small brown bottle and he didn’t say whether they were Chinese herbs or not.  Dr. Oz put a few drops of the herb liquid into the mouth of a volunteer and she said the taste was acceptable, but Dr. Oz tried it himself and said that the herb liquid tasted awful.  Don’t worry, if you want to try some herbs for your kidneys, you can get them in the form of pills that are so tiny that they can easily be swallowed by anyone.   (more…)

March 27, 2011

Geraldine Ferraro dead at 75 from blood cancer (multiple myeloma)

Filed under: Health — Tags: , — furtherglory @ 8:59 am

Yesterday, I was reading a book about Macrobiotics and watching the news on TV at the same time, when I heard that Geraldine Ferraro had died of “blood cancer” or multiple myeloma. Just at that moment, by some strange coincidence, I had been reading about blood in the human body in the Macrobiotics book.  I dropped everything and rushed to the Internet to look up multiple myeloma.

I learned that cancerous plasma cells in the blood can form a tumor in the bone marrow, called myeloma; tumors in several sites is termed multiple myeloma. I also learned that multiple myeloma seems to start in people between the ages of 65 and 70. Oh, oh, sounds like a problem caused by failing kidneys.  The kidneys are always to blame, according to the wisdom of my Traditional Chinese Medicine doctor.    (more…)

February 15, 2011

What is “high blood pressure” called in Traditional Chinese Medicine?

Filed under: Health — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 7:18 am

What does a Chinese doctor say when he tells you that you have “high blood pressure”?

This is a trick question. In Traditional Chinese Medicine, there is no word for what Western doctors call “high blood pressure” or hypertension.  (more…)