Scrapbookpages Blog

November 11, 2017

Holocaust survivor Steve Ross is back in the news

Filed under: Dachau, Germany, Holocaust — furtherglory @ 11:00 am

You can read about Holocaust survivor Steve Ross in this recent news article: http://www.wbur.org/radioboston/2017/11/09/holocaust-steve-ross

Begin quote from news article:

Steve Ross was just 9 years old when he was imprisoned in a Nazi concentration camp.

Over the next five years, he was starved, beaten, experimented on, forced into labor, and terrorized at 10 different death camps. He escaped death by hiding in human waste in an outhouse and by holding onto the axle of a train as it went to another death camp.

On April 29, 1945, American soldiers liberated Dachau. Some 30,000 Holocaust survivors were freed. Ross was among them. As he walked away from the camp, he came upon a U.S. army lieutenant, sitting on a tank, eating food. What happened next transformed Ross’ life.

“After I was rescued from hell, in the valley of death, I came upon a soldier on a tank that showed me compassion for the first time, concern, and took me back to God to civilization and mankind,” Ross often tells people. “He gave me his food, he puts his arm around me, and he he gave me a flag.”

That encounter also set Ross on a path that eventually lead to Dorchester, and his work with at-risk youth in Boston, trying to ensure that such evil was never forgotten.

His story is told in a new documentary, “Etched in Glass: The Legacy of Steve Ross,” which premiers Friday at Coolidge Corner Theatre.

End quote from news article

I wrote about Steve Ross on my scrapbookpages.com website several years ago.

The following information is from my website:

Steve Ross is allegedly the boy on the far left in the photo above

The young boy on the far left in the photograph above is Stephen Ross, a 14-year-old Jewish orphan from Poland, who said that he had survived 10 different concentration camps in 5 years before he was liberated at Dachau by American soldiers. Standing next to Steve Ross is Juda Kukieda, the son of Mordcha Mendel and Ruchla Sta.

According to the book “Dachau 29 April 1945, the Rainbow Liberation Memoirs,” edited by Sam Dann, Stephen Ross (real name Szmulek Rozental) was one of the lucky few who was rescued in the nick of time when Dachau was liberated. Ross was interviewed for the book and according to his own story, he was one of the 1,800 prisoners who were crowded into one quarantine barrack, which was designed to hold only about a hundred prisoners.

Ross said that the prisoners in the quarantine barrack had not been fed for two weeks before the Seventh Army arrived. Food was scarce, and according to Ross, the prisoners were fed only occasionally when they were given “a biscuit, hard as a rock and covered with mold.”

From the quarantine block, Ross said that 80 to 100 prisoners a day were carried out and put on the pile of dead bodies near the barbed wire fence, from where they were taken to the crematory.

According to Ross, the quarantine block was where the German SS Doctors Sigmund Rascher and Klaus Schilling selected prisoners for their ghastly experiments. The doctors “removed thirty to forty prisoners on a daily basis for experiments” according to Ross.

Ross said that he “had been isolated in quarantine for experiments since 1944.” On the day of liberation, Ross made his way to the main gate, although he “was very weak and hardly able to walk.” With the help of his brother, who was also in the camp, Ross made it to the front of the crowd and was included in one of the most famous photographs of the liberation, shown at the top of this page.

After the liberation of Dachau, Ross had to stay in the camp until the typhus epidemic was brought under control. When he was released, he made his way to Munich where he was hospitalized for 6 months and treated for tuberculosis. He was then sent to a Displaced Persons camp for orphans at a former forced labor camp in Landsberg am Lech, near Munich. Finally, he was brought to America where he was able to recover his health.

Stephen Ross is the founder of The New England Holocaust Memorial in Boston.

 

November 10, 2017

Young students can learn about the Holocaust by playing video games

Filed under: Dachau, Germany, Holocaust — furtherglory @ 1:31 pm

You can read all about it in this news article: http://www.tabletmag.com/jewish-arts-and-culture/249092/call-of-duty-and-the-holocaust

The following quote is from the news article:

Begin quote

Released last week, the game, a first-person shooter set in Europe’s killing fields, goes to great lengths to give players the feeling that they’re experiencing a slightly quicker-paced interactive version of a Ken Burns documentary. From D-Day to the Battle of the Bulge, a small band of brothers, American soldiers all, bond as they shoot Nazis by the dozens, making for a game that prides itself as much on its character development and attention to detail as it does its smooth mechanics and great graphics.

Which leaves us, alas, with the question of the Holocaust.

As a serious-minded game, Call of Duty: WWII cannot afford to skip the question of Nazi atrocities. Previous games, although not too many, have tackled the same subject, usually making the horror more palatable by adding fantastical elements to the plot. Cruelty, as titles like 2014’s Wolfenstein: The New Order proved, is easier to stomach when perpetrated by Nazi robots that remind you with every overwrought metallic movement that you’re only playing a silly game. The new Call of Duty is made of sturdier stuff, and as it heads to its conclusion, it enters a concentration camp, determined to keep the same somber and realistic tone it has sustained from the start.

End quote

I wrote about Auschwitz on my website BEFORE I became a Holocaust denier, which means that my website is kosher, and completely devoid of Holocaust denial.

You can read the kosher version of the Holocaust on my website at http://www.scrapbookpages.com/AuschwitzScrapbook/Tour/Auschwitz1/Auschwitz02.html

It was only after I began visiting the Holocaust sites that I became a Holocaust denier. One of the reasons that I became a denier is that I had actually seen a gas chamber in Jefferson City, Missouri, when I was 11 years old, so I knew what a gas chamber was supposed to look like.

I knew that a gas chamber could not have a door with a glass window in it, which could easily be broken by the victims who were being gassed.

Gas pellets were allegedly put into Dachau gas chamber through this opening

The news article continues with this quote:

Begin quote

What if Call of Duty had allowed us, instead of shooting mindlessly at every German soldier we see, to capture a few of the concentration camp’s guards and then decide whether they deserved fair treatment as prisoners of war or brisk and violent retribution for their hideous crimes? And what if the game took just a bit more of a risk and infused its narrative with, say, interviews with witnesses and survivors? Another stellar indie game, recently released, does just that: Called Attentat 1942, it looks at the Nazi occupation of Czechoslovakia by weaving together archival footage, testimonies from civilians who lived under German occupation, interactive comics, and other innovative forms that make gameplay not only entertaining but edifying.

In video games, then, like in cinema, the future seems bittersweet, with a glut of big and loud titles that numb the eye, the mind, and the soul interspersed with a few daring exceptions that help us ponder the question great art has always addressed, which is: What does it mean to be human?

End quote

 

August 7, 2017

Why Holocaust denial is against the law in some countries

Filed under: Dachau, Germany, Holocaust — furtherglory @ 10:57 am

You can read an answer on Quora about why “Holocaust denial” is against the law in some countries: https://www.quora.com/Why-is-holocaust-denial-a-crime-in-some-countries

The following quote is from the answer:

Begin quote

Clearly criminalising holocaust denial is against free speech.  Equally clearly, some countries have made a decision that free speech is not a be all and end all, but must be balanced against the other rights of the people in their society.

The countries that have laws making holocaust denial a crime are almost entirely those that were directly affected*: Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Hungary, Israel, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Poland, Romania

The European Union also has a Framework Decision for Combating Racism and Xenophobia** by which signatories agree to criminalise inciting violence or hatred, against race, colour, religion, descent or national or ethnic origin, condoning, denying or grossly trivialising genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes. Although full implementation was blocked by the United Kingdom and the Nordic countries.

In addition several of the countries with laws criminalising holocaust denial, and several other countries, have more generic laws preventing either usage of Nazi symbols or denial of crimes against humanity.

Many of these countries:

  • feel the right not to be subjected to racism, xenophobia and anti-Semitism is more important than the right to free speech
  • limit speech in other ways, such as banning hate speech.
  • have other laws designed to suppress any potential revival of Nazism

End quote

There is an easy way to stop people from denying the Holocaust: Don’t let anyone see the former concentration camps. Especially, don’t let anyone see the alleged gas chambers.

Seeing the alleged gas chambers was what put me on the Road to Denial. Of course, I had one advantage: I had seen a real gas chamber in Jefferson City, MO. I knew that a gas chamber requires a high smoke stack to get rid of the gas fumes. So when I saw the alleged gas chamber at Dachau, I said to myself: “Something wrong!” There was no high smoke stack.

 

July 21, 2017

The fate of African-German children under the Nazis

Filed under: Dachau, Germany, Uncategorized — Tags: , — furtherglory @ 2:41 pm

Today, I am responding to a news article about an African-German prisoner at Dachau: http://www.cnn.com/2017/07/21/world/black-during-the-holocaust-rhineland-children-film/index.html

The photo above shows an African-German prisoner at Dachau

In America, we think of African-American children as being Americans. Not so in Germany. The German people wanted Germany to be a “whites only” country of people with German ancestry. Bad Germans.

There was at least one Dachau concentration camp prisoner who had African Ancestry: Johnny Voste, a Belgian resistance fighter who had been arrested in 1942 for alleged sabotage; he was one of the survivors of Dachau.

According to Paul Berben, a former prisoner at Dachau, who wrote a book called “Dachau: 1933 – 1945: The Official History,” there were 67,649 prisoners in Dachau and its sub-camps when the last census was taken on April 26, 1945, three days before the US 7th Army arrived to liberate the camp.

Many of the sub-camps, to which Berben refers, as “Kommandos,” had already been evacuated and the prisoners had been brought to the main camp at Dachau. The largest number of prisoners in the whole Dachau system were classified as political prisoners, who numbered 43,401; the majority of them were Catholic.

The political prisoners included Communists, Social Democrats, anarchists, spies, and anti-Fascist resistance fighters from the Nazi occupied countries such as France, Belgium, Norway, the Netherlands, and Poland.

There was a total of 22,100 Jews in the Dachau system on April 26, 1945 and most of them were in the subcamps. Many of them had just arrived a few days before from other camps that had been evacuated.

On April 27, 1945, a train carrying prisoners evacuated from Buchenwald had arrived at the main camp, but less than half the 5,000 to 6,000 mostly Jewish prisoners who had left Buchenwald were still alive after the 21-day trip and able to walk into the main camp.

On April 26th, approximately 3,400 Jews had been death-marched out of the main camp, headed south toward the mountains where it is believed that the Nazis intended to hold them as hostages to use in surrender negotiations with the Allies. Another 1,735 Jews had been evacuated from Dachau by train on April 26th.

Dachau was the camp where Catholic priests, mostly from Poland, were imprisoned. Approximately 2,700 priests were brought to Dachau, where they were designated as political prisoners because they had been arrested as resistance fighters after the invasion of Poland by the Nazis on Sept. 1, 1939.

There were also German priests incarcerated at Dachau and at least one of them, Father Peter Roth, was there because he had been arrested as a pedophile. Father Roth redeemed himself by volunteering to take care of the sick prisoners in the camp and after the camp was liberated, he stayed on to serve as the priest for the German soldiers who were imprisoned at Dachau. The street that borders the camp on the south side has been named after him.

There were 110 homosexuals, 85 Jehovah’s Witnesses and 1,066 anti-socials in Dachau and its sub-camps on April 26, 1945, according to Berben’s book. The Jehovah’s Witnesses were German citizens who were being held because they had refused to serve in the German army.

What I am trying to explain here is that this African-German prisoner at Dachau was not put into a camp because he had African ancestry.

The following quote is from the news article, cited above:

Begin quote
A new film aims to highlight a Nazi “secret” mission to sterilize hundreds of Afro German children. (CNN)In 1937, mixed race children living in the Rhineland were tracked down by the Gestapo and sterilized on “secret order.” Some were later the subject of medical experiments, while others vanished.

“There were known to be around 800 Rhineland children at the time,” says historian Eve Rosenhaft, professor of German Historical Studies, at the University of Liverpool.

It was a little known part of Holocaust history until Mo Abudu, chief executive of Nigerian media network EbonyLife TV, read an online article by Rosenhaft on the plight of these children.

End quote

July 17, 2017

Dachau experiments are back in the news

After all these many years, the medical experiments done at the Dachau concentration camp, are back in the news.

You can read about it at http://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/dachau-georg-tauber-artwork-nazi-germany

The following quote is from the news article:

Begin quote

When Dr. Sigmund Rascher of the Schutzstaffel (SS), a paramilitary organization of Nazi Germany, started conducting his merciless medical experiments at the Dachau concentration camp using prisoners as guinea pigs, he sent for a prisoner, an artist, to document his work. His assistant Walter Neff, a former camp inmate himself, approached Georg Tauber, a Bavarian advertising illustrator. Lured by the prospect of a reduced prison term, Tauber took the offer in 1942. However, unable to stomach the barbarity on display, he showed up at these sessions not more than three times.

One day, he told Neff that he had had enough. As Tauber recalled later in a 1946 letter to the Munich Public Prosecution Office, “Neff said to me, ‘Don’t be so stupid, he can get you released in a few months and you’re free.’ ‘Walter,’ I said, ‘even if I have to stay here for another ten years, it’s alright. I can’t watch that again, I just can’t.’”

End quote

I have a section on my scrapbookpages.com website about the medical experiments done at Dachau. These experiments were done to SAVE lives.

http://www.scrapbookpages.com/DachauScrapbook/experiments.html

The following quote is from my kosher website:

Begin quote

Among the worst atrocities committed at the infamous Dachau concentration camp were the cruel and inhumane medical experiments, using prisoners as guinea pigs, conducted by Dr. Sigmund Rascher for the benefit of the Luftwaffe, the German Air Force.

From March 1942 until August 1942, Dr. Rascher performed high altitude experiments under the authority of Reichsführer-SS Heinrich Himmler. The Nazi justification for these experiments was that this was done in an effort to save the lives of German pilots.

In 1942, the American government did similar high altitude experiments for the US Air Force. According to a book entitled “Lindbergh” by A. Scott Berg, these experiments began on September 22, 1942 when Charles Lindbergh and six of his colleagues flew to Rochester, Minnesota where they met Dr. Walter M. Boothby, a pioneer in aviation medicine, who was the chairman of the Aeromedical Unit for Research in Aviation Medicine at the Mayo Clinic.

Their mission was to study the medical problems associated with high altitude flying. For the next ten days, Lindbergh himself became a human guinea pig, according to Berg’s book.

After the conquest of Germany, the American government confiscated the results of Dr. Rascher’s tests and made use of his experiments for the US Air Force.

End quote

Read more on my website at http://www.scrapbookpages.com/DachauScrapbook/experiments.html

 

 

 

 

July 2, 2017

Displaced Persons [DPs] then and now

Filed under: Dachau, Germany, Uncategorized, World War II — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 11:03 am

As I have mentioned many times, I spent 20 months living in Germany after World War II. My husband was an Army officer. The Army wives lived on the Army base and rarely interacted with the German people.

My husband wanted to “live on the economy” meaning that he wanted to live in a German house, not on the Army base. He wanted to meet the German people and interact with them, so he had rented the upstairs rooms in a German house before I arrived.

As soon as I arrived in Germany, I was taken to the German house, that my husband had rented, and left there all alone while my husband continued doing soldier stuff. Of course, I started crying immediately. My German land lord immediately bounded up the steps and brought me some wine. He spoke to me very soothingly, but I couldn’t understand a word that he said.

Minutes later, two scruffy looking DPs came up the stairs and knocked on my door. They asked me if they could have the cigarette butts from my ash tray. I assumed that they were going to smoke these cigarette butts, and I didn’t want them to do that, so I handed each of them a carton of cigarettes, and they left.

When my landlord saw them leaving with the cigarette cartons, he came running up the stairs, screaming at me not to give these people anything — because they were DPs.  I said “What’s a DP?”

That was my introduction to the aftermath of war and the people who were displaced by war.

I recently posted a video about displaced persons, which you can see by following the link below:

https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2017/07/01/video-germany-45-the-other-story-part-1-east-prussia/

I also wrote about the DPs, in the context of the Dachau camp, on my website at

https://www.scrapbookpages.com/DachauScrapbook/KZDachau/DachauLife01E.htm

The photo below shows a display in the Dachau museum.

Display about the refugee camp at Dachau

The photo above shows information in the Dachau Museum about the Dachau refugee camp which housed ethnic Germans who had been expelled from the Sudetenland in what is now the Czech Republic, after World War II ended. Many of the “expellees” from the Sudetenland settled in Bavaria where Dachau is located. One of the streets near the former Dachau camp is named Sudetenland Strasse.

Unless visitors spend a lot of time in the Museum at the Dachau Memorial Site, they will probably leave without learning that Dachau was a refugee camp for Volksdeutsche (ethnic Germans) longer than it was a concentration camp. Even then, visitors are likely to be confused about who the refugees were.

Some guides at Dachau tell visitors that the refugees were people from the Soviet Union or Russia who were fleeing Communism, although they were actually Germans who were the victims of ethnic cleansing after German land in East Prussia, eastern Pomerania, eastern Brandenburg and Silesia was given to Poland, and the Sudetenland in the former Czechoslovakia was given to the newly formed Czech Republic.

A total of 9,575,000 ethnic Germans were expelled from the eastern territories of Germany and 3,477,000 were expelled from Czechoslovakia in 1945 and 1946. An additional 1,371,000 ethnic Germans were expelled from Poland. Altogether, a total of 17,658,000 Volksdeutsche were expelled from their homelands and forced to flee to Germany, which was about the size of the state of Wisconsin after World War II. (Source: A Terrible Revenge by Alfred-Maurice de Zayas)

This building was a restaurant for the refugees at Dachau. It was torn down years ago.

The photograph above shows an old building that was used for disinfecting the clothing at Dachau. Before it was torn down, this building was used as a restaurant when the Dachau camp was a refugee camp for Germans who had been expelled from the Sudetenland in what is now the Czech Republic after the war. It was torn down in 1965 to make room for a Memorial Site. The location of the building is where the Jewish Memorial building now stands.

In her book entitled “The High Cost of Vengence,” Freda Utley wrote the following in a Chapter entitled “Our Crimes Against Humanity”:

The Poles, who were given possession of the territory “east of the Oder-Neisse line,” drove out the inhabitants with the utmost brutality, throwing women and children, the aged and the sick, out of their homes with only a few hours’ notice, and not sparing even those in hospitals and orphanages.

The Czechs, no less brutal, drove the Germans over the mountains on foot, and at the frontier stole such belongings as they had been able to carry. Having an eye for profit as well as revenge, the Czechs held thousands of German men as slave laborers while driving out their wives and children.

Many of the old, the young, and the sick died of hunger or cold or exposure on the long march into what remained of Germany, or perished of hunger and thirst and disease in the crowded cattle cars in which some of the refugees were transported. Those who survived the journey were thrust upon the slender resources of starving occupied Germany. No one of German race was allowed any help by the United Nations. The displaced-persons camps were closed to them and first the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration (UNRRA) and then the International Refugee Organization (IRO) was forbidden to succor them. The new untouchables were thrown into Germany to die, or survive as paupers in the miserable accommodations which the bombed-out cities of Germany could provide for those even more wretched than their original inhabitants.

How many people were killed or died will never be known. Out of a total of twelve to thirteen million people who had committed the crime of belonging to the German race, four or five million are unaccounted for. But no one knows how many are dead and how many are slave laborers. Only one thing is certain : Hitler’s barbaric liquidation of the Jews has been outmatched by the liquidation of Germans by the “democratic, peace-loving” powers of the United Nations.

As the Welsh minister, Dr. Elfan Rees, head of the refugee division of the World Council of Churches, said in a sermon delivered at Geneva University on March 13, 1949 : “More people have been rendered homeless by an Allied peace than by a Nazi war.”

The estimate of the number of German expellees, or flüchtlinge as the Germans call them, in Rump Germany is now eight or nine million. The International Refugee Organization (IRO) takes no account of them, and was expressly forbidden by act of Congress to give them any aid. It is obviously impossible for densely over-crowded Western Germany to provide for them. A few have been absorbed into industry or are working on German farms, but for the most part they are living in subhuman conditions without hope of acquiring homes or jobs.

The photos below show reconstructed barracks buildings at the former Dachau camp.

Two reconstructed barracks at Dachau

Door into reconstructed barracks at Dachau

 

June 8, 2017

Dachau Survivor Steve Ross is back in the news

Filed under: Dachau, Germany, Holocaust, World War II — furtherglory @ 3:56 pm

In this undated World War II-era photograph provided by Many Hats Productions, Holocaust survivor Steve Ross wears a Nazi prison camp uniform. The Holocaust survivor’s life is recounted in a new documentary titled “Etched in Glass: The Legacy of Steve Ross,” premiering in Newton, Mass., Wednesday, June 7, 2017. The film recounts the former Boston youth counselor’s five years spent in Nazi concentration camps as a child and his decadeslong search for the American soldier who gave him a U.S. flag handkerchief during the liberation of the Dachau concentration camp in Germany. (courtesy of the family via Many Hats Productions via AP)

===========================================

The photo and text shown above are from this news article: http://www.militarytimes.com/articles/film-spotlights-holocaust-survivors-search-for-us-soldier

The following quote is from the news article:

Begin quote

Ross’ search for the benevolent soldier and his life after the war is recounted in a new documentary screened in the Boston suburb of West Newton on Wednesday evening.

“Etched in Glass: The Legacy of Steve Ross” focuses on the five years Ross spent in concentration camps to his life as a war orphan in America, his career helping at-risk youths in Boston and his successful efforts to erect the striking glass New England Holocaust Memorial in downtown Boston.

Ross, now 90 and his speech limited by a stroke, attended Wednesday’s screening with his family, the filmmakers and members of the soldier’s family.

“It’s not your typical Holocaust film,” said Roger Lyons, the director of the nearly hourlong film. “Steve is a unique person. He took his second life and he really ran with it.”

End quote

Steve Ross is the boy on the far left

I wrote about Steve Ross in this previous blog post:

https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2012/11/14/the-day-that-holocaust-survivor-stephan-ross-was-liberated-from-dachau/

and on this previous blog post:

https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2013/08/11/holocaust-survivor-steve-ross-recovering-from-a-stroke-cant-remember-details-of-dachau-liberation/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

June 4, 2017

What can students learn on a one-hour trip to Dachau?

Filed under: Dachau, Germany, Holocaust, Uncategorized — Tags: , — furtherglory @ 5:33 pm

The following quote is from a news article which you can read in full at http://www.usctrojans.com/sports/w-volley/spec-rel/053017aaa.html

Student enters the former Dachau camp

The following is a quote from the news article:

This morning, we started the final day of our trip in Munich. The [volleyball] team had a great breakfast at the hotel before we took a bus ride about 10 miles out of town to Dachau. Our visit to the concentration camp memorial was a short trip, but it was nice to see it, and something I think everyone should experience.

I think if you’re going to make the trip, or visit that concentration camp, it’s in your best interest to take at least a couple of hours instead of just one hour. It’s a really heavy experience and it’s really emotional; and I think in order to really appreciate it and have respect for the place itself, you do need to take a couple more hours and really take in what it may have been like to be there as someone who was a prisoner of that camp.

It was rough though. I cried a couple of times and I know that Brittany [Abercrombie] almost threw up because it was all just very gnarly. There’s really not a lot to visually take it that would otherwise make you emotionally or physically sick, but it’s more of the reading and realizing throughout the experience that this is what people were doing or living through on a daily basis.

It was really hot out today; about 77 to 80 degrees out, and I just remember walking through there and thinking to myself, “wow, I can’t wait until we get back to air conditioning.” But then, to think of the people who were there, the prisoners of this war, and in that camp specifically… there was no A/C. Many of them died from heat exhaustion, and were working in extreme conditions, whether it was cold in the winter or hot in the summers.

Seeing the gas chambers with the gurneys in them, I was just like, “oh my god.” Reading that they would put two or three bodies in there [an oven] at a time was just incredible. Looking around at all of my teammates and other people at the camp, it was impossible to imagine that human beings were treated like objects. It wasn’t even that long ago. It was less than 100 years ago.

Our visit to the barracks with the bunk beds and how they were all really confined in spaces was really gnarly. I’ve had a hard time rooming with one other person and in two separate beds. I can’t even imagine being one of four or more people in one small space together. It was literally just enough for someone to lie flat on his or her back and you’re probably right next to someone, and there’s zero privacy.

People were there for years on end. It’s so hard to fathom and wrap my mind around something like that. Thinking about it, we’re so spoiled now with what we have. It’s just crazy that people’s lives were stripped of their humanity and people were treated like animals. It basically felt like they were chickens in chicken coops and that’s pretty much how these people were living everyday. I don’t even know how to describe it. The men who were running these concentration camps… to completely just look at other people as animals and not as human beings; and to do the things that they did to them; beat them to death, murder them on the spot, and put them in these gas chambers, and burn them alive, it’s a really, really heavy thing.

Throughout history in general, we learn from it and hope to not make the same mistakes later in life. I think it’s amazing that the camp is still there for people to go visit as a living example of the past. It’s huge for people to go see it and to use it as an experience and to learn from it so that we don’t repeat history or repeat something like this.

Visiting this camp at the end of the trip was interesting. Throughout our 12-day trip, we were all exhausted, because it was day in and day out getting up early and being on the go; just constantly moving. I know a lot of us may have complained at some point about doing certain things or about how tired we were, but visiting Dachau at the end of our trip really put things in perspective, and I hope it made an impression on all of our girls.

At the end of the day, we do all get to go home, and we do get to rest and feel comfortable where we are. That’s something the people imprisoned at that camp could never have done and some never even imagined. We were traveling for 12 days, and I mean, these people were there for years. It’s just crazy. I wish that we had more time there to really experience the whole thing.

As far as volleyball goes, I felt this trip helped us learn how to work together; work out some of the kinks that we’ve had. We tried a couple of our different rotations and we learned different things about different players. For instance, I feel like at the end of this trip, my hitters learned how to trust me more, and I can feel that. It showed as we progressed throughout the trip.

Spending time together in general, we learned more about each other and we learned how to be more comfortable with each other. In any team sport, it’s much more difficult to work with a bunch of people if you don’t really get to know each other or if you don’t really hang out together. It’s about learning to trust each other off the court and translating that to trusting each other on the court. I think it just creates this gelling environment and I think it flows right into when we move on to the fall.

This whole trip is an experience that I will not soon forget, but I will definitely remember the camp at Dachau today. I want to come back at some point to properly visit it. Something else I will never forget is the alpine sled that we rode down in Maribor.

End quote

Why am I quoting this article about a visit to Dachau, you ask?

I find it remarkable that these students had no idea why certain people were put in camps while a war was going on. They thought that the Nazis were bad people who were being mean to people for no reason.

May 30, 2017

The disinfection chambers for clothing at Dachau

Filed under: Dachau, Holocaust, Uncategorized, World War II — Tags: , — furtherglory @ 12:47 pm

It has come to my attention that there are still people who believe that the clothing disinfection chambers at Dachau were used for gassing the prisoners.

My photo of doors into clothing disinfection chambers at Dachau

When the American soldiers liberated Dachau, one of the first buildings that they saw was the building where the clothing of the prisoners had been disinfected to kill the lice that spreads typhus. The soldiers thought that the prisoners were told to take off their clothes, hang the clothes neatly on hangers and then step into the gas chamber to be killed, a few at a time.

At that time, in 1945, few people knew what an actual gas chamber looked like. When the American soldiers saw the door with the word “Gaszeit” on the door, they assumed that this was a room where the Dachau prisoners had been gassed.

Clothing hung up outside the “gas chamber” door at Dachau

The American soldiers who liberated Dachau had never seen a homicidal gas chamber, as I had. I had seen the real gas chamber in Jefferson City, MO when I was a child.  The American soldiers thought that the prisoners were told to take off their clothing and hang everything neatly outside the homicidal gas chamber before going into a small room to be killed with poison gas.

These American soldiers had never before heard of using poison gas to kill lice. At that time, America was using DDT for this purpose. Typhus had been completely wiped out in America and most of these soldiers had never heard of it; they didn’t know that typhus is a contagious disease spread by body lice.

They saw the word “gas” written on the 4 disinfection chamber doors, and assumed that these were the infamous gas chambers used for killing the Jews, which they had heard about. They saw the deloused clothing hung up and assumed that the prisoners had been forced to undress and hang their clothing neatly on a hanger before entering the disinfection chambers to be killed.

It had been common knowledge throughout the world since June 1942 that the Nazis were murdering millions of Jews in gas chambers.

The photograph below, which was taken by T/4 Sidney Blau on April 30, 1945, shows a US soldier standing in front of one of the disinfection chamber doors. Note the word “Gaszeit” on the door, which has since been repainted. Gaszeit is a German word that means gas time in English.

The photograph below, which was taken by T/4 Sidney Blau on April 30, 1945, shows a US soldier standing in front of one of the disinfection chamber doors. Note the word “Gaszeit” on the door, which has since been repainted. Gaszeit means gas time in English.

American soldier poses in front of what he thinks is a homicidal gas chamber at Dachau

These American soldiers had never heard of using poison gas to kill lice. At that time, America was using DDT for this purpose. Typhus had been completely wiped out in America and most of these soldiers had never heard of it; they didn’t know that typhus is a contagious disease spread by body lice.

 

May 29, 2017

Japanese-American soldiers who fought in the American army

Filed under: Dachau, Uncategorized, World War II — Tags: , — furtherglory @ 4:29 pm

Who remembers that Japanese-American soldiers fought in the American army in World War II?

This news article brings the memories of the Japanese-American soldiers back: http://www.timesofisrael.com/these-us-soldiers-liberated-dachau-while-their-own-families-were-locked-up-back-home/

I have a whole section on my scrapbookpages.com website about these Japanese-American soldiers: https://www.scrapbookpages.com/DachauScrapbook/DachauLiberation/LiberationDay3A.html

The following quote is from my website:

The 522nd Field Artillery Battalion of the 442nd Regimental Combat Team, which consisted entirely of Japanese-American soldiers, is acknowledged by the US Army as the liberators of one of the 123 sub-camps of Dachau, and also as the liberators, on May 2, 1945, of some of the prisoners who were on a death march out of the main Dachau camp.

The Go for Broke National Education Center web site has the following information about the sub-camp that was liberated by Japanese soldiers in the 522nd Field Artillery Battalion:

On April 29, 1945, several scouts were east of Munich in the small Bavarian town of Lager Lechfield when they saw a sight they would never forget. The Nisei came upon some barracks encircled by barbed wire.

Technician Fourth Grade Ichiro Imamura described it in his diary:
“I watched as one of the scouts used his carbine to shoot off the chain that held the prison gates shut. . . They weren’t dead, as he had first thought. When the gates swung open, we got our first good look at the prisoners. Many of them were Jews. They were wearing striped prison suits and round caps. It was cold and the snow was two feet deep in some places. There were no German guards. The prisoners struggled to their feet. . . They shuffled weakly out of the compound. They were like skeletons – all skin and bones. . .”

Holocaust historians conclude that the Nisei liberated Kaufering IV Hurlach. This camp housed about 3,000 prisoners. Hurlach was one of 169 subordinate slave labor camps of Dachau.

Contrary to claims made by the Go for Broke National Education Cener, the United States Holocaust Memorial Musuem and the US Army credit the 12th Armored Division of the US Seventh Army with the liberation of the Kaufering IV sub-camp of Dachau on April 27, 1945 with help from soldiers in the 101st Airborne Division, who arrived on April 28, 1945. Kaufering IV was one of 11 camps, all named Kaufering and numbered I through XI, which were located near Landsberg am Lech, not far from the city of Munich. Kaufering IV, which was near the town of Hurlach, had been designated as a sick camp where prisoners who could no longer work were sent.

End quote from my website.

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