Scrapbookpages Blog

May 20, 2017

Sybille Steinbacher’s account of the liberation of Dachau

Filed under: Dachau, Germany, Holocaust, Uncategorized — furtherglory @ 4:58 pm

One of the readers of my blog mentioned Sybille Steinbacher’s account of the libertation of Dachau.

I wrote about Steinbacher on my website years ago.  The following information is from my scrapbookpages.com website:

According to Sybille Steinbacher, who wrote a book entitled “Dachau: The Town and the Concentration Camp,” the US Army commandant of the town, after the liberation, spoke angrily to the 30 Dachauers on the day that they were brought to see the Dachau concentration camp. He told them, “As punishment for the brutality that the town tolerated next door to it, it should be sacked and turned into ashes!”

The town priest, Father Friedrich Pfanzelt, who was among the visitors, pleaded with the Americans not to destroy the town. In a series of articles in 1981, a Dachau newspaper named the Dachauer Nachrichten wrote about how the priest saved the town: “On his knees, the prelate pleaded for mercy for Dachau.”

According to Peter Wyden, author of “The Hitler Virus,” 90 percent of the residents of Dachau were Catholic. Regarding Father Pfanzelt, Wyden wrote: “Then, from the pulpit of his St. Jacob’s Church three days later, the priest set in motion Dachau’s great trauma, the protestation of innocence, the denial of guilt that would never leave the community.”

Of all people, Father Pfanzelt should have been aware of the atrocities committed inside the Dachau concentration camp. According to Wyden, “For years the SS had extended him the privilege of conducting Sunday services in the KZ. And he had reciprocated with many ingratiating letters (which Steinbacher found) and had taken pride in his cordial relations with most of the camp commandants.”

Father Pfanzelt died in 1958 without ever confirming or denying that he had saved the town from the wrath of the Americans.

 

May 19, 2017

91 year old Richard Dutro remembers the liberation of Dachau

Filed under: Dachau, Germany, Uncategorized — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 10:16 am

91-year-old Richard Dutro is on the far right in the photo above

I have a section about the liberation of Dachau on my website at https://www.scrapbookpages.com/DachauScrapbook/DachauLiberation/index.html

Richard Dutro was among the American soldiers who liberated Dachau.

You can read about the liberation of Dachau in this news article:

http://www.clevelandjewishnews.com/news/local_news/ohio-governor-s-th-annual-holocaust-commemoration/article_6846b618-3b36-11e7-b6f3-370fd3b9814f.amp.html

Dutro’s unit, the 42nd Infantry under the direction of Gen. George Patton, had left France to head east toward Munich. However, along the way, his unit happened upon what they soon learned was Dachau.

“We came upon something that smelled like a slaughterhouse,” Dutro said. “I grew up in Zanesville, where we had slaughterhouses. But this was a slaughterhouse of human beings.”

The scene that Dutro described was gruesome and gut-wrenching. He recalled 114 train cars at the nearby train station full of dead prisoners the Germans did not have time to burn in the crematorium before the Allies invaded. Barrels full of personal items such as eyeglasses and teeth, things that do not incinerate in a gas chamber, were abundant and strewn about.

As it happened, one of Dutro’s fellow soldiers owned a Brownie camera. The soldier took photos of various scenes, and Dutro ended up with eight of those black-and-white photos. Ohio Gov. John R. Kasich assisted Dutro by holding each photo up so attendees at the commemoration could see them for themselves as the liberator spoke of them. Dutro said the photographs would be donated to a Holocaust museum upon his death.

Here is the full story of the liberation of Dachau:

The infamous Nazi concentration camp at Dachau was liberated on Sunday, April 29, 1945, just one week before the end of World War II in Europe. Two divisions of the US Seventh Army, the 42nd Rainbow Division and the 45th Thunderbird Division, participated in the liberation, while the 20th Armored Division provided support.

On the day of the liberation, Dachau consisted of a main camp just outside the town of Dachau and 123 sub-camps and factories in the vicinity of the town. The next day, on 30 April 1945, at around 9 o’clock in the morning, one of the major Dachau sub-camps at Allach was liberated by the 42nd Division.

On the day before the liberation of the main camp, the acting Commandant, Martin Gottfried Weiss, had turned everything over to a group of prisoners called the International Committee of Dachau and had then fled along with most of the regular guards that night. According to Arthur Haulot, a member of the International Committee, German and Hungarian Waffen-SS soldiers were then brought to the camp in order to surrender the prisoners to the U.S. Army.

Both the 45th Thunderbird Division and the 42nd Rainbow Division were advancing on April 29, 1945 toward Munich with the 20th Armored Division between them. Dachau was directly in their path, about 10 miles north of Munich.

The 101st Tank Battalion was attached to the 45th Thunderbird Division. According to this source the 101st arrived in the town of Dachau at 9:30 a.m. on April 29th.

According to Lt. Col. Felix Sparks, the commander of the 157th Infantry Regiment of the 45th Thunderbird Division, he received orders at 10:15 a.m. to liberate the Dachau camp, and the soldiers of I Company were the first to arrive at the camp around 11 a.m. that day.

Nerin E. Gun, a Turkish journalist who was a prisoner at Dachau, wrote that “The Americans were not simply advancing; they were running, flying, breaking all the rules of military conduct, mounting their pieces on captured trucks, using tractors, bicycles, carts, trailers, anything on wheels that they could get their hands on. The Second Battation, 222nd Reigment, 42nd Divison, was coming brazenly, impudently down the highway, its general in the lead.”

On their way to Munich, the 42nd Division soldiers had met some newspaper reporters and photographers who told them about the camp and offered to show them the way. Lt. William Cowling was with Brig. Gen. Henning Linden when the first soldiers of the 42nd Division arrived at the camp and were met by 2nd Lt. Heinrich Wicker who was waiting near a gate on the south side, ready to surrender.

 

May 3, 2017

The story of Dachau, as told to tourists

Filed under: Dachau, Germany, Holocaust — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 4:30 pm

In 2005, the entrance into the Dachau Memorial site was changed so that visitors can now see a section of the brick path upon which the prisoners walked as they neared the Arbeit Macht Frei gate into the prison camp.

My photo of the gate into the Dachau camp

 

New prisoners walked on this brick path into the Dachau concentration camp

The photo above shows the brick path and the grass covering the rubble of the factory buildings that were torn down after American troops took over the SS training camp and the Army garrison next door to the concentration camp.

Visitors can now see a few of the buildings inside the former SS garrison, including the Administration building which is the white building trimmed in yellow on the right in the photo above. When I visited in 2007, I was told that this building was the Commandant’s house, but I have since learned that his house was torn down in 1987.

On the left side of the photo, you can see the ramp upon which supplies for the camp were unloaded. Passenger trains did not enter the Dachau camp.

A new gravel path, [shown in the photo above] which leads from the bus stop to the Arbeit Macht Frei gate, was constructed in 2005 on the south side of the Dachau complex, which includes the former concentration camp and what is left of the former SS Army Garrison and Training Center for concentration camp administrators, which the Dachau tour guides refer to as a “school of violence” or a “school of terror.”

The entrance into the Dachau Memorial Site was changed again when a new Visitor’s Center was completed. New signs which tell the story of Dachau were added.

I have been to the town of Dachau, and to the concentration camp near the town, several times. The last time that I was there was in 2007.

I have a whole section about the Dachau camp on my scrapbookpages.com website: http://www.scrapbookpages.com/DachauScrapbook/KZDachau/DachauLife01A.html

 

April 25, 2017

The Donald gives a speech and mispronounces nearly every word

Filed under: Dachau, Holocaust, Trump, Uncategorized — Tags: , , , — furtherglory @ 10:13 am

Trump at Holocaust remembrance — Photo credit New York Times

In the past, I have written several blog posts about Donald Trump including this one which you can read at https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2016/07/25/is-donald-trump-the-new-hitler/

This morning, I listened to President Trump give a speech, and I was shocked to hear him mispronounce so many well-known words, regarding the Holocaust.

For example, Trump mispronounced the word Nazi. He said Nozzy instead of Not-see.

Then he mispronounced the name of the most famous person who ever claimed to be a Holocaust survivor, but wasn’t: Elie Wiesel.

Just before he died, Wiesel confessed that he was never in a concentration camp. He was probably hiding out in his childhood home in Hungary, which I wrote about in this blog post: https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2016/07/05/the-childhood-home-of-elie-the-wiesel/

Trump mispronounced Wiesel’s first name as Elly, instead of E-lee.  The way that Trump pronounced “Elly”, it rhymed with Smelly and Jelly.   He mispronounced the word Wiesel as Weasel, instead of Vee-zel.

Near the end of his speech, President Trump told the story of Gerda Klein who claimed that she had been held by the Nazis in a prison in Poland for 3 years. Trump did not give the name of the prison, so that we could look it up.

Gerda claimed that she was liberated from Dachau by American soldiers. That day was Gerda’s 21st birthday and she weighed 68 pounds, according to the story told by Trump.

I have written extensively on my scrapbookpages.com website about the liberation of the Dachau camp: http://www.scrapbookpages.com/DachauScrapbook/DachauLiberation/LiberationDay4.html

I wrote my website many years ago — in 1998, and at that time, I had never heard the story of Gerda Klein.  So I do not believe her story. Trump should have given some proof of this story.

It is strange that I never heard about Gerda Wiessmann when I was studying the liberation of Dachau.

I blogged about Gerda before on the link below.

https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2011/02/15/holocaust-survivor-awarded-medal-of-freedom/

April 19, 2017

The anniversary of the liberation of Dachau is coming up soon

Filed under: Dachau, Germany, Holocaust, Uncategorized, World War II — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 4:26 pm

My photo of the gate into the Dachau camp

I was the wife of a US Army officer in 1957 and my husband and I were living in Germany, a few miles from Dachau. I had read about Dachau but I thought that it would be too horrible for me to visit. I had a chance to go to visit the former camp, but I declined to go. I wish now that I had gone.

To read all about Dachau, go to this section of my website: http://www.scrapbookpages.com/DachauScrapbook/index.html

This section on my website is all about the liberation of the camp: http://www.scrapbookpages.com/DachauScrapbook/DachauLiberation/index.html

This page is especially interesting:

http://www.scrapbookpages.com/DachauScrapbook/DachauLiberation/LiberationDay3.html

The following quote is from my website:

Begin quote

Two Divisions of the US Seventh Army were involved in the liberation of the Dachau main camp on April 29, 1945, and with each passing year, the argument grows more heated over which division really liberated the camp, the 42nd Infantry Division or the 45th Infantry Division. The 20th Armored Division was providing support and they are included as liberators of Dachau by the US Army. However, Japanese and African-American veterans have also made claims that their divisions or battalions liberated Dachau.

End quote

April 3, 2017

I have been to Dachau

Filed under: Dachau, Germany, Holocaust, Uncategorized — Tags: , — furtherglory @ 8:12 am

The title of my blog post today is a line from a news article which you can read in full at http://www.kiowacountysignal.com/opinion/20170402/rich-kiper-comparing-planned-parenthood-abortions-to-holocaust-is-fair

I have been to Dachau several times and I have a whole section about the camp on my website at http://www.scrapbookpages.com/DachauScrapbook/KZDachau/index.html

The quote from the news article continues with this:

The site of the crematoriums and the chilling sculpture of humans entangled in barbed wire is a visual representation of an evil that condemned six million Jews to death for being guilty only of being Jews. The fact that six million innocent Jews were exterminated is verified by the US Holocaust Memorial Museum as well as innumerable other sources. Only Holocaust deniers refute that number.

My photo of the International Monument at Dachau concentration camp

My photo of the “chilling sculpture” at Dachau

The photo immediately above was taken during a light rain. It shows the back side of the monument at Dachau.

But to get back to basics, the news article begins with this quote:

Begin quote

Sen. Steve Fitzgerald recently was attacked by Planned Parenthood (PP), the Kansas Interfaith Action organization, and the Midwest Center for Holocaust Education. The attacks resulted from a letter that Sen. Fitzgerald wrote to PP regarding a donation that had been made to PP in the senator’s name by a Prairie Village resident.

The pro-life senator expressed his “dismay” that someone would make a donation to PP in his name. He went on to state that “This is as bad – or worse – as having one’s name associated with Dachau.” Dachau was a Nazi concentration camp in which 41,500 Jews and political prisoners were exterminated.

End quote

Notice that Jews were always exterminated, like bugs, but never murdered nor killed. That is because Jews were allegedly killed with Zyklon-B, the same way that the lice in the clothing was killed.

I have a whole section on my website about the Dachau gas chambers: http://www.scrapbookpages.com/DachauScrapbook/GasChamber/Index.html

My photo of the Dachau gas chamber

April 1, 2017

American students were asked to debate in favor of the Holocaust

Filed under: Dachau, Holocaust, Uncategorized — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 8:29 am

Photo that is displayed in the United States Holocaust Museum shows Jews marching to the gas chamber

I am blogging today about a news article which you can read in full at http://www.attn.com/stories/16077/students-asked-debate-holocaust

The following quote is from the news article:

Begin quote

Students in Oswego County, New York were asked to argue for and against the Nazi’s “Final Solution” as part of an assignment.

The “Final Solution” was Nazi Germany’s plan to exterminate the Jews, which was formulated and implemented during World War II as an answer to the so-called “Jewish Question.” As the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum explains, “Six million Jewish men, women, and children were killed during the Holocaust—two-thirds of the Jews living in Europe before World War II.”

End quote

What a revolting development this is!

As everyone knows, the Jews were killed for no reason. Jews are “God’s Chosen People” who are allowed to lie, steal and cheat because they are Jews.

The article says that “six million were KILLED”. Apparently the Jews were taken care of so well that no one died of disease; the Jews in the sacred “six million” were all killed.  Apparently, no one died of typhus or any other disease.

Bodies of Jews were cremated in ovens like this at Dachau

The bodies of the dead Jews were cremated in an effort to stop the spread of disease. However, no Jews died of disease, according to the official Holocaust story.

Ashes of unknown prisoners, who died of typhus, are buried in this grave at Dachau

Begin another quote from the same news article:

The assignment was offered in a “Principles of Literary Representation” class taught through the CiTi/BOCES New Vision Program — which allows high school students to take college-level courses on SUNY’s Oswego campus three times a week. According to Syacruse.com, there were no Jewish students in the class that year.

According to the text of the assignment, the debate was not meant for people to be sympathetic to the Nazi point of view, but rather the assignment was meant to get students out of their comfort zones and teach them to debate points that are against their ideological perspectives, Syracruse.com reports.

End quote

March 12, 2017

Once a week she washed herself in showers that on alternate days gassed people

Filed under: Dachau, Germany, Holocaust, Uncategorized — Tags: , — furtherglory @ 3:42 pm

The title of this blog post is a sentence from a news story which you can read in full here: http://www.greenwichtime.com/local/article/A-Holocaust-surviver-talks-about-prejudice-to-10966943.php

This is the full quote from the news story:

Begin quote

GREENWICH — She saw the worst of humanity: mankind moved to enslave, execute and exterminate because of prejudice.

She rode for days locked in a cattle car packed with men, women and children, some dead, some insane.

She was sent to years of hard labor, one nonentity out of many in a long line of women facing a man [Josef Mengele] she described as an “Angel of Death” who chose her [to be gassed] and made her family walk the other way.

My photo of a shower nozzle at Dachau

Once a week she washed herself in showers that on alternate days gassed people. She subsisted on a sip of soup a day. She dragged the exhausted long miles of the Death March from Auschwitz to Bergen-Belsen while laggers were shot.

She survived.

End quote from news article

You have to admire the German people. If anyone could design a room that provided showers, and on alternate days, gassed people, the Germans could do it.

Josef Mengele

You can read about Josef Mengele on Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Josef_Mengele

I wrote about Josef Mengele on my website at http://www.scrapbookpages.com/AuschwitzScrapbook/History/Articles/Selection.html

February 25, 2017

Holocaust survivor says Donald Trump is not the human being to be president

Filed under: Dachau, Holocaust, Trump, Uncategorized — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 2:30 pm

The following quote is from a news article which you can read in full at https://collegian.com/2017/02/holocaust-survivor-shares-experience-in-auschwitz/

Begin quote

[Fanny] Starr is concerned that under the current presidential administration, she will become a victim again.

“I’m very much against this government, and I’m very scared I will become a victim again,” Starr said. “(President Donald Trump) is not the human being to be president.”

Starr says she continues to speak to counteract anti-Semitism present in the world today.

The following quote is from the news artical:

Begin quote

Fanny Starr said she lost her will to live when she entered the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp months before it was liberated by the British.

“I told my sister, ‘I don’t want to live. I don’t have nobody,’” Starr said upon entering Bergen-Belsen.

Starr said her sister, Rena Alter, grabbed her by the collar of her striped outfit.

“She grabbed me by my clothes, stood me up and said, ‘This is our life, no mom, no dad,’” Starr said.

fanny-starr-elliott-jerge2.jpg
Fanny Starr, this year’s featured speaker for Holocaust Awareness Week, shares her story about surviving internment in several Nazi concentration camps during World War II. (Elliott Jerge | Collegian)

Starr shared her experience as a Holocaust survivor in the Nazi concentration camps with over 1200 students Wednesday night for the 20th annual Holocaust Awareness Week. Rebecca Chapman, a freshman at East High School, and Alex Ingber, the Vice President of Students for Holocaust Awareness, asked Starr questions about the Holocaust.

Starr, born in 1922, was a teenager when her family was forced into the Lodz ghetto.

According to Starr, there was very little food, and people received food once a month if they were lucky.

Starr and her family were taken to Auschwitz in a train car of nearly 60 people after the [Lodz] ghetto was liquidated in 1944.

Starr remembers Auschwitz as a horrid place where the Jewish people were stripped of their clothes, and their identities were reduced to numbers. She remembers seeing the writing “Arbei Macht Frei” and Dr. Josef Mengele in his black uniform as she got off the train.

Starr remembers how [Dr.] Mengele assessed each Jew who got off the train and decided who looked healthy enough to work or who would be sent to the gas chambers.

“My youngest sister, (as) we were standing in the line to see him, … pinched my cheeks, and I pinched her cheeks to look (healthy),” Starr said.

Starr remembers laying in a field in Auschwitz, looking up at the night sky as bodies burned in the ovens.

“The sky was red, and the smell was horrid,” Starr said. “You could smell the body smell and the hair smell. We could see the ashes coming down like snow.”

Starr lost her mother and two siblings to the gas chambers in Auschwitz. Her father starved in Dachau.

She said she and her sister came to America in 1951. Starr said they visited a cemetery to say their goodbyes to family members even though their family’s bodies “were just ashes.”

End quote

What can I say about this? She is a typical “liar, liar, pants on fire” Jewish Holocaust survivor.

February 22, 2017

Karl Röder was forced by Nazi officials to forge the “Arbeit macht frei” slogan on the Dachau gate

Filed under: Dachau, Germany, Holocaust, Uncategorized — Tags: , , , — furtherglory @ 5:41 pm
My photo of the gate into the Dachau camp

My photo of the gate into the Dachau camp

The title of this blog post comes from a line in a news article, which you can read in full at http://www.dw.com/en/stolen-arbeit-macht-frei-gate-returned-to-holocaust-memorial-in-dachau/a-37665320

The following quote is from the news article:

Begin quote

The original wrought-iron gate carrying the infamous Nazi slogan “Arbeit macht frei” (“work sets you free”) was returned to Dachau from Norway on Wednesday.

It will be restored and publicly unveiled this April on the 72nd anniversary of the camp’s liberation. The gate will not be returned to its original location, but rather be displayed in the museum on the grounds of the former concentration camp near Munich in Bavaria that now serves as a memorial.

End quote

I have been to the former Dachau camp several times, beginning with my first visit in 1998.

The red brick road up to the Dachau gate

My photo of the red brick road up to the Dachau gatehouse

I have a section on my website about the Dachau gate: http://www.scrapbookpages.com/DachauScrapbook/KZDachau/Gatehouse.html

The iron gate at the entrance through the Dachau gatehouse into the prison compound is shown in my photo at the top of this page.

The sign which reads “Arbeit Macht Frei” was removed soon after the Dachau camp was liberated, but it was reconstructed in 1965 at the same time that two barrack buildings were reconstructed for visitors. One of the reconstructed barracks can be seen on the left side of my photo at the top of this page.

The slogan “Arbeit Macht Frei” was allegedly coined by Propaganda Minister Josef Goebbels in an effort to convince the public that the Nazi concentration camps were merely work camps designed to politically rehabilitate Communists, Social Democrats and anarchists.

This slogan was first used over the gate of a “wild camp” in the city of Oranienburg which was set up in an abandoned brewery in March 1933 during the time that the first political prisoners were being held for an indefinite period without charges in a number of places in Germany.

In 1936, the Oranienburg camp was rebuilt as the Sachsenhausen camp. The Dachau camp was also rebuilt, starting in 1936. The gatehouse at Sachsenhausen also bears this inscription, but the third major German concentration camp, Buchenwald, has a sign on the gate that reads “Jedem das Seine,” which means To Each his Own.

Dachau and Sachsenhausen were both Class I camps for offenders, who were considered capable of being rehabilitated and who were eligible for possible release.

Rudolf Höss, who trained at Dachau and then served as an adjutant at Sachsenhausen before becoming the first Commandant at Auschwitz, used this motto over the gate into the main camp, Auschwitz I, which was classified as a Class I camp for political prisoners. Auschwitz II, also known as Birkenau, was not a Class I camp, so Birkenau did not have this slogan over the gatehouse.

Two other Nazi concentration camps which used the slogan “Arbeit Macht Frei” on their gate houses were Flossenbürg and Gross-Rosen. This slogan also appeared on a gate inside the Gestapo prison in the Small Fortress at Terezin, formerly known as Theresienstadt.

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