Scrapbookpages Blog

August 25, 2017

The Mauthausen memorial site is in the news

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust, Uncategorized, World War II — furtherglory @ 2:44 pm

Mauthausen Memorial site is included in an article which you can read  at http://www.atlasobscura.com/places/mauthausen-memorial

You can see some recent photos of the former Mauthausen camp at http://www.atlasobscura.com/places/mauthausen-memorial

I have a section about Mauthausen on my website at http://www.scrapbookpages.com/Mauthausen/KZMauthausen/index.html

I visited the Mauthausen memorial site in 2003 and took the photo below.

My 2003 photo of Mauthausen

The following quote is from the news article:

Begin quote

The outside areas [at Mauthausen] feature sculptures that honor the 190,000 people from over 40 different nations who were imprisoned during the camp’s seven years of terror. Memorial sculptures of varying sizes and styles pay homage to the Jewish, French, Dutch, Polish, and other victims of Mauthausen.

One particularly striking statue is the Albanian Memorial, which portrays an Albanian resistance fighter standing over a defeated Nazi soldier. He’s about the strike the Nazi in the face with his rifle stock.

End quote from news article.

My photo above shows the sculpture of the Albanian resistance fighter ready to strike a German soldier.

The photo shows part of the monument of Albania, which was erected in 1969. It depicts a defeated German soldier being subdued by the strong arm of an Albanian resistance fighter.

Note the swastika on the belt buckle of the fallen soldier. Flowers have been left for the defeated soldier by visitors who may have been confused by this statue which shows a German soldier as the victim, not an Albanian resistance fighter as the victim of the Nazis.

Another photo of the fallen German soldier statue where someone has left flowers for the German soldier

This monument conveys the message that World War II was a war of annihilation, winner take all, no second place, no conditional surrender accepted, nothing short of total victory allowed, kick ’em while they’re down and then erect a monument to humiliate the vanquished for generations to come.

This monument is not about the 300 – 400 Albanians who were among the victims at Mauthausen, but rather a celebration of the anti-Fascist victory over the Hitlerites.

 

August 18, 2017

The liberation of Buchenwald is mentioned in today’s news

Filed under: Germany, Trump, World War II — furtherglory @ 12:54 pm

The liberation of Buchenwald by American soldiers….

My photo of the gatehouse at the Buchenwald camp

American soldiers arrive at the Buchenwald gate

You can read about the liberation of Buchenwald in this current news article: http://www.denverpost.com/2017/08/18/what-would-gene-amole-a-liberator-of-buchenwald-write-about-charlottesville/

The following quote is from the news article:

Begin quote

The other day I listened to Donald Trump’s justification for the violence at Charlottesville and his wink and nod to the alt-right, white nationalists, neo-Nazis, or whatever they call themselves, some of whom he said were “very nice people.” I call them evil.

With too few exceptions, his remarks have been followed with stunning silence by Republican members of Congress and the members of his cabinet. Others actually are defending his words.

Then I got to thinking about my father, the late Rocky Mountain News columnist, Gene Amole. During World War II he served in the unit that would liberate the Buchenwald death camp. What he saw there gave him nightmares for the rest of his life.

He never talked about it. One day he saw me reading a book about the Nazis, so he sat down and told me the story of how he and his fellow soldiers arrived at Buchenwald to find more than 21,000 naked, starving and nearly dead prisoners using what little strength they had to cheer their arrival.

They hugged the Americans and wept with relief and joy at the sight of them. The shocked and horrified soldiers passed out their own rations, gave up their coats, blankets and whatever else they had to cover their emaciated bodies.

End quote

I have written about the liberation of Buchenwald on my website at http://www.scrapbookpages.com/Buchenwald/Liberation0.html

My version of the story of the Buchenwald liberation is a little different. My version starts off with this quote from my website:

Begin quote

The Buchenwald concentration camp was liberated on April 11, 1945 by four soldiers in the Sixth Armored Division of the US Third Army, commanded by General George S. Patton. Just before the Americans arrived, the camp had already been taken over by the Communist prisoners who had killed some of the guards and forced the rest to flee into the nearby woods.

Pfc. James Hoyt was driving the M8 armored vehicle which brought Capt. Frederic Keffer, Tech. Sgt. Herbert Gottschalk and Sgt. Harry Ward to the Buchenwald camp that day.

End quote — continue reading at http://www.scrapbookpages.com/Buchenwald/Liberation0.html

 

August 6, 2017

…the long and shameful history of anti-Semitism in Ireland.

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust, World War II — furtherglory @ 10:53 am

2nd December 1938: Some of the 5,000 Jewish and non-Aryan German child refugees, the ‘Kindertransport’, arriving in England at Harwich from Germany. (Photo by Fred Morley/Fox Photos/Getty Images)

The Irish people are noted for being very friendly and fun-loving. I’ve been to Ireland. It was the first place I went when I started traveling 30 years ago.  I was welcomed in Ireland as if I were a long lost cousin.

I was not aware, until now, that the Irish are anti-Semitic. Why would anyone not love Jews?  What’s not to like?

The title of my blog post today is a quote from a news article which you can read in full at http://www.independent.ie/irish-news/comment-antisemitism-was-rife-when-ireland-shut-the-door-to-jews-seeking-refuge-35999118.html

The following quote is from the news article:

Begin quote

The columnist Kevin Myers sparked outrage this week with his offhand remark that Jews were “not generally noted for their insistence on selling their talent for the lowest possible price”.

Myers was sacked for his reference to two highly-paid Jewish BBC broadcasters in The Sunday Times in an article about salaries at the British broadcaster.

After apologising profusely, he later claimed he was a “great admirer of Jews” and their culture of “exploring their talent and making the most of it”.

The former columnist insisted that he was not anti-Semitic, but the suggestion that Jews were motivated by money would have been familiar to anyone who has followed the long and shameful history of anti-Semitism in Ireland.

Public figures have expressed much more virulent anti-Jewish sentiments in the past; unlike Myers, in most cases they got away with it, because at times in our history such sentiments were popular.

The hateful stereotype of the grasping Jew was a theme in political discourse, going right back to Arthur Griffith and the birth of Sinn Féin.

At its worst, the stirring of hatred against Jews by some politicians and churchmen helped to create a climate where Jewish refugees from Europe were unable to escape to Ireland from the Holocaust. It could be a life-and-death issue.

End quote

What should you learn from this news article? The Jews have been hated since time began, and they will continue to be hated, the world over, until the end of time.

That’s all she wrote —  and she rubbed that out.

 

August 4, 2017

Remember when America refused to save Jews from Nazi Germany?

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust, World War II — furtherglory @ 6:21 pm

UNSPECIFIED – CIRCA 1754: Jewish refugees aboard the ‘SS St Louis’ attempt to communicate with friends and relatives in Cuba, who were permitted to approach the docked vessel in small boats. The passengers were not allowed to disembark.

If only America had taken in the Jewish passengers on the ship called the St. Louis. The Jews were forced to return to Germany where they were sent to camps and killed. This was the beginning of the Holocaust, which could have been avoided altogether if only America had taken in all the Jews who were trying to escape from Germany.

The following quote is from the news article which you can read in full at http://fortune.com/2017/08/04/trump-gop-legal-immigration-bill-raise-act-english/

Begin quote

Republican Sens. Tom Cotton (Ark.) and David Perdue (Ga.), with the endorsement of the White House, released the Reforming American Immigration for Strong Employment (RAISE) Act on Wednesday. If passed, the bill would make deep cuts in legal immigration and substantial changes in the categories under which immigrants are admitted to the U.S.

Some supporters of the bill have cited the recommendations of the U.S. Commission on Immigration Reform—often called the Jordan Commission after Barbara Jordan, its chair—as justification for the legislation. That could not be further from the truth. As the executive director of the commission, I can attest to the fundamental differences between the RAISE Act and our recommendations.

In its first report to Congress, the commission concluded that “legal immigration has strengthened and can continue to strengthen this country.” Its recommendations sought to improve the admission process by ensuring timely entry of immediate family of U.S. citizens and legal permanent residents (LPRs), as well as timely entry of workers and refugees.

End quote from news article

July 30, 2017

A famous Holocaust photo that is back in the news….

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust, Uncategorized, World War II — furtherglory @ 4:09 pm

Gen. Dwight Eisenhower and other high-ranking U.S. Army officers on April 12, 1945, view the bodies of prisoners who were killed during the evacuation of the Ohrdruf camp in Ohrdruf, Germany. Courtesy | United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, courtesy of National Archives and Records Administration, College Park.

http://www.joplinglobe.com/opinion/columns/carol-stark-a-glimpse-of-old-horrors-new-challenges/article_1efcdd4f-46c4-59db-869f-a7cd004df95c.html

The photo above, from the July 30th, 2017 Joplin Globe, marks the start of the Holocaust as we know it today.

The following quote from my scrapbookpages.com website tells the story of the photo:

Begin quote from my website

On April 4, 1945, American soldiers of the 4th Armored Division of General Patton’s US Third Army were moving through the area south of the city of Gotha in search of a secret Nazi communications center when they unexpectedly came across the ghastly scene of the abandoned Ohrdruf forced labor camp [shown in the photo above].

A few soldiers in the 354th Infantry Regiment of the 89th Infantry Division of the US Third Army reached the abandoned camp that same day, after being alerted by prisoners who had escaped from the march out of the camp, which had started on April 2nd.

Prior to that, in September 1944, US troops had witnessed their first concentration camp: the abandoned Natzweiler camp in Alsace, which was then a part of the Greater German Reich, but is now in France.

Ohrdruf, also known as Ohrdruf-Nord, was the first Nazi prison camp to be discovered while it still had inmates living inside of it, although 9,000 prisoners had already been evacuated from Ohrdruf on April 2nd and marched 32 miles to the main camp at Buchenwald.

According to the US Holocaust Memorial Museum, the camp had a population of 11,700 prisoners in late March, 1945 before the evacuation began.

The photograph at the top of this article, taken at Ohrdruf on April 8, 1945, shows survivors who had escaped during the evacuation of the camp, but came back after the American liberators arrived.

One of the American liberators who saw the Ohrdruf camp on April 4, 1945 was Bruce Nickols. He was on a patrol as a member of the I & R platoon attached to the Headquarters company of the 354th Infantry Regiment of the 89th Infantry Division, Third US Army.

According to Nickols, there were survivors in the barracks who had hidden when the SS massacred 60 to 70 prisoners on the roll call square, before they left the camp on April 2nd. The body of a dead SS soldier lay at the entrance to the camp, according to Nickols.

The American soldiers were told by Ohrdruf survivors that these prisoners had been shot by the SS on April 2nd because they had run out of trucks for transporting sick prisoners out of the camp, but there were sick prisoners still inside the barracks when the Americans arrived.

Among the soldiers who helped to liberate Ohrdruf was Charles T. Payne, who is Senator Barak Obama’s great uncle, the brother of his maternal grandmother. Charles T. Payne was a member of Company K, 355th Infantry Regiment, 89th Infantry Division.

According to an Associated Press story, published on June 4, 2009, Charles T. Payne’s unit arrived at the Ohrdruf camp on April 6, 1945.

End quote from my website

The following is an excerpt from an Associated Press article:

Begin quote

“I remember the whole area before you got to the camp, the town and around the camp, was full of people who had been inmates,” Payne, 84, said in a telephone interview from his home in Chicago.

“The people were in terrible shape, dressed in rags, most of them emaciated, the effects of starvation. Practically skin and bones.”

When Payne’s unit arrived, the gates to the camp were open, the Nazis already gone.

“In the gate, in the very middle of the gate on the ground was a dead man whose head had been beaten in with a metal bar,” Payne recalled. The body was of a prisoner who had served as a guard under the Germans and been killed by other inmates that morning.

“A short distance inside the front gate was a place where almost a circle of people had been … killed and were lying on the ground, holding their tin cups, as if they had been expecting food and were instead killed,” he said. “You could see where the machine gun had been set up behind some bushes, but the Germans were all gone by that time.”

He said he only moved some 200-300 feet (60-100 meters) inside of the camp. But that was enough to capture images so horrible that Gen. George S. Patton Jr. ordered townspeople into Ohrdruf to see for themselves the crimes committed by their countrymen – an order that would repeated at Buchenwald, Dachau and other camps liberated by U.S. soldiers.

“In some sheds were stacks of bodies, stripped extremely – most of them looked like they had starved to death. They had sprinkled lime over them to keep the smell down and stacked them several high and the length of the room,” Payne said.

End quote

On April 11, 1945, just a week after the discovery of the Ohrdruf camp, American soldiers liberated the infamous Buchenwald main camp, which was to become synonymous with Nazi barbarity for a whole generation of Americans.

Buchenwald is located 5 miles north of the city of Weimar, which is 20 miles to the east of Gotha, where General Dwight D. Eisenhower had set up his headquarters.

The Ohrdruf forced labor camp was a sub-camp of the huge Buchenwald camp. Ohrdruf had been opened in November 1944 when prisoners were brought from Buchenwald to work on the construction of a vast underground bunker to house a new Führer headquarters for Hitler and his henchmen. This location was in the vicinity of a secret Nazi communications center and it was also near an underground salt mine where the Nazis had stored their treasures.

A. C. Boyd was one of the soldiers in the 89th Infantry Division who witnessed the Ohrdruf “death camp.” In a recent news article, written by Jimmy Smothers, Boyd mentioned that he saw bodies of prisoners who had been gassed at Ohrdruf.

There has been some speculation that the Germans might have tested an atomic bomb near Ohrdruf. In his book entitled “The SS Brotherhood of the Bell,” author James P. Farrell wrote about “the alleged German test of a small critical mass, high yield atom bomb at or near the Ohrdruf troop parade ground on March 4, 1945.” The “troop parade ground” was at the German Army Base right next to the Ohrdruf labor camp.

Why did General Eisenhower immediately order a propaganda campaign about Nazi atrocities? Was it to distract the media from discovering a far more important story?

The first news reel about the Nazi camps called Ohrdruf a “murder mill.” The camp was claimed to be a place where prisoners were killed; the possibility of an atomic bomb being made was not mentioned.

That’s all she wrote — and she rubbed that out. [lines from a song]

 

 

July 24, 2017

The Brandenberg gate in Berlin

Filed under: Germany, World War II — furtherglory @ 8:44 am

I took this photo in 2002 when the Brandenburg gate in Berlin was covered over, while it was being repaired.

 

The other photos were provided by hermie, a reader of my blog.

You can read hermie’s comment about the recent visit to Berlin, made by the Duke and Dutchess of England, by following the link below:

https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2017/07/23/duke-and-dutchess-visit-the-horror-in-berlin/#comment-81770

July 22, 2017

100 Mann und ein Befehl

Filed under: Language, Music, World War II — Tags: — furtherglory @ 9:52 am

This song was suggested by a reader who said this in an outstanding comment, which you can read by clicking on the link below:

https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2017/07/21/hes-not-heavy-hes-my-brother/#comment-81696

I like the classic WW2 footage that comes with the rendition above.

I have also linked to the classic 1966 Heidi Brühl version

Begin quote from the outstanding comment:

There was another song that used the same tune as “Green Berets”, but it was anti-war and it was in German.

The song was “Hundert Mann und ein Befehl”. by Freddy Quinn…

…..and here are the English lyrics:

Hundert Mann und ein Befehl

English translation

Somewhere in a foreign land,

they wander through rock and sand,

far from home and fair game,

100 men and he’s there as well

100 men and one command

and a way that no one wants,

day in, day out, to who knows where,

burned land and what’s the use?

All alone in the dark night,

you have often thought about it,

that far from here the full moon shines

and far from here a young girl cries.

And the world is still so beautiful.

If I could see you just once.

Now separating us already a long year,

because a command was our doom.

At random the fate strikes down.

Today him and tomorrow you.

I hear from afar the crows cawing

in the dawn, why does that have to be?

End quote from the outstanding comment

 

July 19, 2017

July 20, 1944 Valkyrie — the bomb plot against Hitler

Filed under: Germany, movies, Uncategorized, World War II — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 11:38 am

On July 20th, 1944 there was a famous assignation attempt against Adolf Hitler.

The five minute video clip above, which is from a Tom Cruz movie, is a fairly accurate reenactment of the incident.  Many people have objected to the casting of Tom Cruz, in the role of the much taller Claus Schenk, Graf von Stauffenberg, but Tom Cruz looks remarkably like Claus Schenk.

There is virtually nothing in Valkyrie, the movie, which shows what ordinary life was like in Germany in July 1944. There are no extras playing the part of a German Fräulein wearing a dirndl; no Germans drinking beer and singing in a beer garden. There is nothing to indicate that the action is taking place in Germany.

Another movie, Revolutionary Road, which was released around the same time, is authentic 1950s America, right down to the smallest detail.

The only scene in Valkyrie that comes close to showing Germany, as it was in 1943, is when Stauffenberg goes to Hitler’s home called the Berghof to get his signature on a document.

We see the famous picture window that looks out on the Bavarian Alps. Hitler’s henchmen are gathered around him at the Berghof and Albert Speer can be identified: there is a bit player who bears a resemblance to him.

BerghofWindow.jpg

The Berghof and surroundings were bombed by the RAF right before the end of the war on April 25, 1945 — it was done out of spite: the area was of no strategic importance at that point.

The famous picture window before it was destroyed 

Hitler is accurately shown in the movie as a broken man, petting his dog, an Alsatian Sheppard. One bit of information that I didn’t know until I saw this movie, many years ago, is that Stauffenberg put in his glass eye whenever he was in the presence of Hitler. He obviously wanted Hitler to have a good opinion of him; in the scene at the Berghof, Hitler says that he wishes that all his Army officers were like Stauffenberg.

In the trailers for the movie, that were shown for weeks before the movie opened, there is a brief scene where someone kills a mosquito with the lit end of a cigarette. Undoubtedly, there were many people who thought that this was a cruel act committed by Hitler, but there was a German guard at Hitler’s Wolf’s Lair headquarters in East Prussia, who actually killed a mosquito on his arm with a lit cigarette.

The Wolf’s Lair was located on swampy ground and that’s why there were mosquitoes. This scene may have been included by the film makers before they learned that Hitler didn’t smoke. In any case, the scene is totally out of context and has no relevance to the movie plot.

On July 20, 1944, an attempt to assassinate Hitler, which had been planned for years by groups which included former political prisoners who had been released from Sachsenhausen, was made by Colonel Claus Schenk von Stauffenberg, an insider on Hitler’s staff. One of those involved in the planning was a former Sachsenhausen political prisoner, Julius Leber, a Social Democrat.

The plan was for the political prisoners at Sachsenhausen, including Schuschnigg and the trade union leader, Carl Vollmerhaus, to take over important positions in the German government after Hitler was dead.

According to Information Leaflet Number 20, which I obtained from the Sachsenhausen Memorial Site:

As one of the first measures for the “restoration of the supreme majesty of the law,” the conspirators wanted the concentration camps closed down. For this reason, the “immediate measures” of the July 20, 1944 plan included the occupation of the concentration camps, the arrest of the commandants and the disarming of the guards by the military. But this never happened.

The assassination attempt failed when someone moved the briefcase containing a bomb, which Col. von Stauffenberg had planted near Hitler’s feet. Von Stauffenberg had left the room before the time bomb went off, and had returned to Berlin where a group of high-ranking German army officers were planning to proclaim martial law, after the announcement of the death of Hitler, and take control of the government. The bomb went off, but Hitler survived the blast with only minor injuries.

According to the Information Leaflet, some of the conspirators arrested immediately after the assassination attempt are believed to have been taken to the Sachsenhausen concentration camp, including Field Marshall Erwin von Witzleben.

Some of the conspirators who were seriously injured or sick, or who had tried to escape arrest by suicide or had become ill while imprisoned, were sent to the well-equipped infirmary barracks at Sachsenhausen where they were kept alive for further interrogations or until they could be put on trial in the People’s Court.

One of the conspirators who was brought to the Sachsenhausen infirmary with severe injuries was Colonel Siegfried Wagner, who had jumped out the window of his apartment in Potsdam on July 22, 1944 in an attempt to escape arrest; he died in the infirmary four days later.

Colonel Carl-Hans von Hardenberg, who was slated to become the head of the state of Berlin-Brandenberg after the takeover by the conspirators, was also taken to Sachsenhausen with severe injuries after he attempted suicide to escape arrest. He was one of the survivors of Sachsenhausen, thanks to a Communist fellow-prisoner, Flor Peeters, who took care of him.

Another conspirator, Lieutenant Colonel Hasso von Boehmer, was brought to the infirmary at Sachsenhausen, so that he could be kept alive long enough for the People’s Court in Potsdam to sentence him to death and execute him.

Only a few of the many conspirators, who were involved in the July 20th plot, were tried in the People’s Court; the others were sent directly to the Sachsenhausen concentration camp without a trial. Only a few of the many conspirators, who were involved in the July 20th plot, were tried in the People’s Court; the others were sent directly to the Sachsenhausen concentration camp without a trial.

Randolph von Breidbach, a resistance fighter against the Nazis, was arrested in 1943 and tried by the Reich War Court; although he was found not guilty by the court, he was held in prison until February 1945 when he was transferred to the Sachsenhausen infirmary, where he stayed behind when the camp was evacuated two months later. He died on June 13, 1945 in Sachsenhausen and was buried in a mass grave behind the infirmary barracks.

On July 30, 1944, ten days after the assassination attempt by von Stauffenberg, Hitler ordered that the family members of von Stauffenberg be arrested as “kinship prisoners.” A total of 180 relatives, mostly wives and children, were arrested in August 1944 and imprisoned at Sachsenhausen in the special section of brick buildings located outside the prison enclosure, called the “Schuschnigg barracks.” This was where former Austrian Chancellor Schuschnigg was held, along with his wife and child, until he was transferred to Dachau in 1945.

 

Auf der Heide blüht ein kleines Blümelein

Filed under: Germany, Language, Music, Uncategorized, World War II — Tags: — furtherglory @ 11:19 am

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erika_(song)

Auf der Heide blüht ein kleines Blümelein
und das heißt: Erika.
Heiß von hunderttausend kleinen Bienelein
wird umschwärmt Erika
denn ihr Herz ist voller Süßigkeit,
zarter Duft entströmt dem Blütenkleid.
Auf der Heide blüht ein kleines Blümelein
und das heißt: Erika.

On the heath, there blooms a little flower
and it’s called Erika.
Eagerly a hundred thousand little bees,
swarm around Erika.
For her heart is full of sweetness,
a tender scent escapes her blossom-gown.
On the heath, there blooms a little flower
and it’s called Erika.

In der Heimat wohnt ein kleines Mägdelein
und das heißt: Erika.
Dieses Mädel ist mein treues Schätzelein
und mein Glück, Erika.
Wenn das Heidekraut rot-lila blüht,
singe ich zum Gruß ihr dieses Lied.
Auf der Heide blüht ein kleines Blümelein
und das heißt: Erika.

Back at home, there lives a little maiden
and she’s called Erika.
That girl is my faithful little darling
and my joy, Erika!
When the heather blooms in a reddish purple,
I sing her this song in greeting.
On the heath, there blooms a little flower
and it’s called Erika.

In mein’m Kämmerlein blüht auch ein Blümelein
und das heißt: Erika.
Schon beim Morgengrau’n sowie beim Dämmerschein
schaut’s mich an, Erika.
Und dann ist es mir, als spräch’ es laut:
“Denkst du auch an deine kleine Braut?”
In der Heimat weint um dich ein Mägdelein
und das heißt: Erika.

In my room, there also blooms a little flower
and it’s called Erika.
Already In the grey of dawn, as it does at dusk,
It looks at me, Erika!
And it is as if it spoke aloud:
“Are you thinking of your fiancée?”
Back at home, a maiden weeps for you
and she’s called Erika.

July 17, 2017

Dachau experiments are back in the news

After all these many years, the medical experiments done at the Dachau concentration camp, are back in the news.

You can read about it at http://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/dachau-georg-tauber-artwork-nazi-germany

The following quote is from the news article:

Begin quote

When Dr. Sigmund Rascher of the Schutzstaffel (SS), a paramilitary organization of Nazi Germany, started conducting his merciless medical experiments at the Dachau concentration camp using prisoners as guinea pigs, he sent for a prisoner, an artist, to document his work. His assistant Walter Neff, a former camp inmate himself, approached Georg Tauber, a Bavarian advertising illustrator. Lured by the prospect of a reduced prison term, Tauber took the offer in 1942. However, unable to stomach the barbarity on display, he showed up at these sessions not more than three times.

One day, he told Neff that he had had enough. As Tauber recalled later in a 1946 letter to the Munich Public Prosecution Office, “Neff said to me, ‘Don’t be so stupid, he can get you released in a few months and you’re free.’ ‘Walter,’ I said, ‘even if I have to stay here for another ten years, it’s alright. I can’t watch that again, I just can’t.’”

End quote

I have a section on my scrapbookpages.com website about the medical experiments done at Dachau. These experiments were done to SAVE lives.

http://www.scrapbookpages.com/DachauScrapbook/experiments.html

The following quote is from my kosher website:

Begin quote

Among the worst atrocities committed at the infamous Dachau concentration camp were the cruel and inhumane medical experiments, using prisoners as guinea pigs, conducted by Dr. Sigmund Rascher for the benefit of the Luftwaffe, the German Air Force.

From March 1942 until August 1942, Dr. Rascher performed high altitude experiments under the authority of Reichsführer-SS Heinrich Himmler. The Nazi justification for these experiments was that this was done in an effort to save the lives of German pilots.

In 1942, the American government did similar high altitude experiments for the US Air Force. According to a book entitled “Lindbergh” by A. Scott Berg, these experiments began on September 22, 1942 when Charles Lindbergh and six of his colleagues flew to Rochester, Minnesota where they met Dr. Walter M. Boothby, a pioneer in aviation medicine, who was the chairman of the Aeromedical Unit for Research in Aviation Medicine at the Mayo Clinic.

Their mission was to study the medical problems associated with high altitude flying. For the next ten days, Lindbergh himself became a human guinea pig, according to Berg’s book.

After the conquest of Germany, the American government confiscated the results of Dr. Rascher’s tests and made use of his experiments for the US Air Force.

End quote

Read more on my website at http://www.scrapbookpages.com/DachauScrapbook/experiments.html

 

 

 

 

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