Scrapbookpages Blog

May 20, 2017

Germany’s first Holocaust professor will give lectures at the former I.G. Farben headquarters

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust, Uncategorized, World War II — furtherglory @ 3:29 pm

Back when I was traveling to Holocaust sites, I wanted to see the I.G. Farben headquarters, where Jews had worked in factories. I was told that tourists were not allowed to get anywhere near this building. I was warned that I should not even say the word I.G. Farben because this place was so secret.

I. G. Farben factories at Monowitz

Now a Jewish professor will be giving lectures at the famous I.G. Farben factory, which tourists have not been allowed to see until now.

Jews working  in a factory at Monowitz

The following quote is from the news article:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4523096/Germany-s-Holocaust-professor-begins-work.html

Begin quote

A female professor took up her appointment at a prestigious German university this week as the country’s first academic to teach the Nazi Holocaust to students.

Some lectures by historian Sybille Steinbacher will be given in the former HQ of the I.G. Farben company which in wartime made the poison gas used to massacre Jews in their millions.

Professor Steinbacher’s appointment by the Goethe University and the Frankfurt Fritz Bauer Institute was described as ‘a milestone on the way to a better understanding of the Nazi crimes and their impact on history into the present’ by Hesse state science Minister Boris Rhein.

End quote

So the I.G. Farben company was making the Zyklon-B gas that was used to kill the Jews. They were not trying to make an atomic bomb as some people claimed.

Auschwitz III, aka Monowitz, was established in 1942 at the site of the chemical factories of IG Farbenindustrie near the small village of Monowitz, which was located four kilometers from the town of Auschwitz. The IG Farben company had independently selected this location around the same time that Reichsführer-SS Heinrich Himmler decided, in April 1940, to locate a new concentration camp in the town of Auschwitz. The most important factory at Monowitz was the Buna Werke, which was owned by the IG Farben company.

Of the three Nazi concentration camps located near the town of Auschwitz, the Auschwitz III camp was the most important to the Nazis because of its factories which were essential to the German war effort. The Monowitz industrial complex was built by Auschwitz inmates, beginning in April 1941. Initially, the workers walked from the Auschwitz main camp to the building site, a distance of seven kilometers.

Max Faust is one of the men that inspected Monowitz along with Heinrich Himmler

The decision to build chemical factories at Auschwitz transformed both the camp and the town. On February 2, 1941, Herman Göring ordered the Jews in the town to be relocated to a ghetto, and German civilians moved into their former homes.

Auschwitz quickly went from a primitive Jewish town of 12,000 inhabitants to a modern German town of 40,000 people which included an influx of German engineers and their families. Both the main Auschwitz camp and the Birkenau camp were expanded in order to provide workers for the factories. Before Monowitz became a separate camp with barracks buildings, the prisoners had to walk from the other camps to the factories.

On July 17 and 18, 1942, Reichsführer-SS Heinrich Himmler made a visit to the Auschwitz complex. The photo directly above shows Himmler talking with German engineer Max Faust about plans for factories at Monowitz, the Auschwitz III camp.

 

May 18, 2017

Who betrayed famous scofflaw Anne Frank?

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust, Uncategorized, World War II — furtherglory @ 8:51 am

Why was Anne Frank a scofflaw, you ask?

During World War II, the Germans required Jews to register, so that the Germans could keep track of them. The Jews were the enemies of the Germans during World War II. The Germans didn’t want the Jews to be fighting, as civilians, against Germany. That’s why the Jews were sent to concentration camps.

Otto Frank was a criminal, who did not want to register, because he would have gone to prison, if he had registered.  Otto had been committing a crime by cheating his banking customers. Otto’s brother, who was also cheating his banking customers,  managed to escape to America before he was arrested as a criminal, but Otto didn’t make it.  Otto Frank literally “missed the boat”.

The following quote is from a news article which you can read in full at http://www.history.com/news/ask-history/who-betrayed-anne-frank

Begin quote

Anne Frank’s father Otto—the only member of the family to survive their subsequent deportation to the concentration camps—was among the first to assert that a betrayal had led to their capture. The group’s hideout was located inside a warehouse he had once owned, and they were aided by several of his employees as well as other Dutch sympathizers.

Shortly after World War II ended, Otto Frank suggested that the culprit was Willem van Maaren, a warehouse employee who was not in on the secret. Van Maaren was later the subject of multiple investigations related to the betrayal—including one by famed Nazi hunter Simon Wiesenthal—but he always maintained his innocence, and none of the cases ever produced any evidence against him.

End quote

Note that the news article suggests that Willem van Maaren  was a criminal because he allegedly betrayed Otto Frank, the criminal who cheated his banking customers.

May 16, 2017

Death statistics at the Buchenwald concentration camp

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust, Uncategorized, World War II — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 7:37 am

 

BuchenwaldGate.jpeg

The photo above shows American soldiers entering the gate into the Buchenwald camp after it was liberated.

One of the readers of my blog wrote in a comment that a recent news article mentioned that “at least 56,000 prisoners died at the Buchenwald camp.”

The 56,000 number is an estimate that was given, many years ago, by someone at the Memorial Site.

On April 19, 1945, only 8 days after the concentration camp had been liberated by the US Army, the Communist prisoners at Buchenwald held a mourning ceremony near the gate house where they had constructed an obelisk in honor of the victims. The obelisk is shown in the photo below.

Memorial in honor of the prisoners who died at Buchenwald

On June 5, 2009, President Barack Obama placed a single white rose on a plaque at the spot where this obelisk once stood. “The White Rose” was a student resistance group at the University of Munich which had opposed Hitler’s government during World War II.

The obelisk, shown in the photo above, was relocated in 1961 to the intersection in the road where the access road to the camp branches off the main road. The writing on the plaque lists the 18 countries of the victims.

In 1999, I went to visit the Memorial Site, where I learned that the official number of deaths at Buchenwald, that was given by the first U.S. Army Intelligence report, dated April 24, 1945, was 32,705.

After the camp was liberated, the Jews who were held in the “Small Camp” in the quarantine barracks at the bottom of the slope, which were the farthest away from the gate house, were not invited to attend the ceremony held by the Communist political prisoners. At this ceremony, the number of prisoners who died in the camp was estimated by the survivors to be 51,000.

In 1999 the Memorial Site at Buchenwald was giving an estimate of 56,000 prisoners who were killed at Buchenwald.

According to a booklet that I obtained from the Buchenwald Memorial Site, which was written by Sabine and Harry Stein, “A total of 11,000 Jews lost their lives in Buchenwald. Out of the 13,969 inmates who died in 1945, there were 7,000 Jews.”

The booklet written by Sabine and Harry Stein, which was available from the Memorial Site in 1999, states that, in addition to the number of recorded deaths at Buchenwald, “More than 8,000 Soviet prisoners of war were shot in the stable. An estimated number of 1,100 people were executed in the crematorium and an estimated number of between 12,000 and 15,000 people were dead upon arrival from the camps in the east or fell victim to the evacuation marches. This gives a total number of approximately 56,000 persons killed.”

The first U.S. Army Intelligence report, dated April 24, 1945, put the Buchenwald death toll at 32,705.

According to a U.S. Army report dated May 25, 1945, there was a total of 238,980 prisoners sent to Buchenwald during its 8-year history from July 1937 to April 11, 1945, and 34,375 of them died in the camp. This report was based on records confiscated from the camp by the US military, after the camp was liberated.

A later U.S. Government report in June, 1945 put the total deaths at 33,462 with 20,000 of the deaths in the final months of the war.

In the first news reel film about what the victorious American troops discovered in Germany near the end of the war, the narrator says that “20,000 out of the 80,000 prisoners at Buchenwald were found alive.” This would mean that 60,000 prisoners died at Buchenwald, which contradicts the Army reports.

The International Tracing Service of Arolsen, an affiliate of the Red Cross, released a report in 1984 which said that the number of documented deaths in Buchenwald was 20,671 plus an additional 7,463 at the notorious satellite camp called Dora, where prisoners were forced to work underground in the manufacturing of V-2 rockets for the German military. (In October 1944, Dora became an independent camp named Nordhausen.)

According to a guidebook which I purchased at Buchenwald in 1999, there were almost 10,000 Jews sent to Buchenwald on November 10, 1938, after the pogrom known as Kristallnacht, and more than 200 of them died after only a few weeks.

The Jews who died in 1945, in the last months of World War II, were prisoners who had been brought to Germany from the camps that were closed in the East as the Germans retreated from the advancing Soviet army. Under Article 7 of the 1929 Geneva Convention, Germany was obligated to move prisoners away from the combat zone.

According to an information booklet, which I obtained from the Buchenwald Memorial Site, records kept by the camp secretary show the number of deaths each year in Buchenwald, as follows:

1937 – 48

1938 – 771

1939 – 1235

1940 – 1772

1941 – 1522

1942 – 2898

1943 – 3516

1944 – 8644

January to March 1945 – 13,056

March to April 11, 1945 – 913

Total 34,375

The horrendous death toll during the first two months of 1945 was due to a typhus epidemic in the camp. During the same time period, there were also severe epidemics in all the other major concentration camps in Germany.

Typhus is spread by lice and prisoners coming into Germany from the death camps in what is now Poland were the carriers of the lice. The worst epidemic of all was at Bergen-Belsen where 35,000 prisoners died in March and the first two weeks of April 1945.

The death statistics for the first 11 days of April in Buchenwald indicate that the typhus epidemic was being brought under control there.

The Nazis did not use DDT, which was first used to stop epidemics in Europe in 1943. To kill the lice that spreads typhus, the Nazis used Zyklon-B, a poison gas which was also used to kill the Jews in the gas chambers in the Auschwitz-Birkenau and Majdanek camps.

The total number of prisoners at Buchenwald was only 5,382 at the start of the war on September 1, 1939, but by the end of September 1939, the camp population had increased to 8,634 after captured Polish soldiers were brought in. By December 1943, there were 37,319 prisoners in the camp, as Resistance fighters from Poland were brought in, along with many Soviet Prisoners of War that were sent to Buchenwald to be executed because they were Communist Commissars. The Soviet POWs were not registered as inmates.

There were 63,084 prisoners in the Buchenwald complex, including the sub-camps, in December 1944 according to the camp records. The population of the main camp and all the sub-camps reached 80,436 in late March 1945 after the death camps in what is now Poland were closed and the Jewish survivors were brought to various camps in Germany, including Buchenwald.

Many concentration camp inmates died on enforced marches, and thousands more died after they were evacuated out of Buchenwald by train in April 1945.

According to the Encyclopedia of the Holocaust, “on April 6, 1945, the Germans began evacuating the Jewish prisoners. The following day, thousands of prisoners of various nationalities were evacuated from the main camps and the satellite camps. Of the 28,250 prisoners evacuated from the main camp, 7,000 to 8,000 either were killed or died by other means in the course of the evacuation. The total number of prisoners from the satellite camps and the main camp who fell victim during the evacuation of Buchenwald is estimated at 25,500….”

Among the prisoners, who died as a result of the evacuation from Buchenwald, were those on the “death train” that reached Dachau on April 28, 1945 after a three-week circuitous route through Czechoslovakia.

The total number of prisoners registered in the Buchenwald camp was around 238,000 according to a guidebook for the city of Weimar, which is about 5 miles from Buchenwald. This book puts the death total at 65,000. Various other sources put the total number of people sent to the camp between 239,000 and 250,000.

May 9, 2017

The Holocaust was the most important thing that ever happened in the entire history of the world

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust, Uncategorized, World War II — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 8:33 am

On my blog today, I am commenting on a news article, about Bronia Brandman, which you can read in full at https://www.brooklyneagle.com/articles/2017/5/8/holocaust-survivor-makes-emotional-return-auschwitz

The news article starts off with this quote:

Begin quote

In an emotional journey that served as her ultimate triumph over the Nazis, an elderly Borough Park resident [Bronia Brandman] who survived the horrors of the Holocaust paid a return visit to the infamous Auschwitz death camp — this time as a free woman.

It was the first time Bronia Brandman, 86, had seen Auschwitz since her liberation nearly 72 years ago.

End quote

Then Brandia’s story continues with her own story of what happened to her during the Holocaust:

Begin quote

“I came to Auschwitz in 1943 as a child of 12. My parents and four siblings were consigned to the gas chambers. The daily bestiality and dehumanization was beyond words, and the world’s silence was deafening,” Brandman said in a statement. “I never wished to return to that place of our degradation and annihilation, but to return in the presence of our noblest, the bravest of the brave — our IDF soldiers, allows my spirit to soar with pride and hope.”

Her journey back to Auschwitz was part of a 10-day trip to Poland and Israel sponsored by FIDF.

Israeli soldiers and FIDF supporters accompanied a group of Holocaust survivors across Poland and Israel. The trip began on April 24 and ended on May 3.

End quote

What am I complaining about now, you ask? I am writing about this woman because she has no conception of why the Germans put Jews into camps during World War II. She also has no conception of the reason why she was not killed, along with the 6 million Jews who were allegedly killed.

Why did the Nazis save young children who would live for years and tell the world about the Holocaust? Stupid Nazis!!!

May 6, 2017

Do you still have your “I like Ike” button?

Filed under: Germany, Uncategorized, World War II — furtherglory @ 10:22 am

If you still have your “I like Ike” button, it could be worth a fortune now. It turns out that Ike is now hated.

Every morning, I check the stats for my blog. I want to know what subjects my blog followers are reading. Yesterday, the subject that got the most hits was “General Dwight D. Eisenhower”.

Why is Eisenhower back in the news, I wondered?

http://www.orlandosentinel.com/os-ed-what-trump-can-learn-from-eisenhower-20170503-story.html

I threw away my “I like Ike” button many years ago. How I wish I had that button now!

Dwight D. Eisenhower was the most beloved president that America ever had — until the truth about him came out. Then those “I like Ike” buttons went into the trash.

Read my previous blog post about Eisenhower at https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2010/07/03/general-dwight-d-eisenhower-the-things-i-saw-beggar-description/

You can read about the Ohrdruf camp on my website at http://www.scrapbookpages.com/Ohrdruf/index.html.

Why should you read about Ohrdruf on my website? Hint: It is believed by some people that the Nazis were trying to build an atomic bomb there. When I tried to visit the former camp, I was turned away at the entrance.

No one is allowed to see what the Nazis were doing there. I went to the nearby town of Ohrdruf but no one there would talk to me.

May 5, 2017

I just saw the new TV show entitled “Mississippi”

Filed under: Germany, Uncategorized, World War II — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 2:03 pm

A TV show with the title “Mississippi” has been heavily advertised for several days. I was really looking forward to seeing this show today because I though it was going to be about the 3,000 German soldiers who were captured during combat in World War II and were then sent to a POW camp in Mississippi.

I thought that the main theme of the show would be that the German soldiers acted badly. Bad Germans!

At this point, I have to tell you that, during World War II, captured German soldiers were sent to my home town to dig ditches along the railroad tracks. My house was only a few feet from the railroad tracks, so these German soldiers were working within a few feet of my house.

I was 12 years old at that time, and I didn’t know anything about the German people. I was completely and totally shocked when I found out that all these men could speak perfect English, and they were all very handsome. Why did America go to war against people like this, I wondered.

Later, when I was living in Germany, after World War II, while my husband was an army officer, I talked to some German men who had been POWs in America. They said that they had been served “pig food” in an American POW camp. They explained that they had been served corn on the cob, and they had to eat it with their hands. They claimed that they had been humiliated by this.

But, to get back to the TV show, it turns out that this was a show about buttons from military uniforms that were found in a former POW camp in Mississippi. This was not what I was expecting. The men in the show were acting very excited about finding some old rusty buttons. Big Deal!

 

May 4, 2017

Irene Zizblatt is still telling her Holocaust survivor story to students

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust, Uncategorized, World War II — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 3:32 pm

I have written several blog posts about Irene Zizblatt in the past: https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/tag/irene-zisblatt/

This blog post is my best one about Irene: https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2012/11/25/stuck-in-the-door-of-the-gas-chamber-how-irene-zisblatt-survived-auschwitz-birkenau/

Irene is still out talking to students in America about how she manged to survive during the Holocaust.

The following quote is from this news article: http://cornellsun.com/2017/05/04/holocaust-survivor-irene-zisblatt-shares-experience-at-concentration-camp/

Begin quote from news article:

Irene Zisblatt, a survivor of the Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp and other atrocities during the Holocaust, shared her story on Wednesday.

The event, hosted by Cornell Hillel, invites a Holocaust survivor every year, “so people truly understand what happened during the Holocaust and get an account from someone who [was] there,” according to Jeremy Marchuck ’19, chair of cultural programming.

“We are the last generation who are able to do this so we want to ensure that as many people hear these stories as possible,” Marchuck said.

During the presentation, Zisblatt described how her youth and her family were destroyed by Nazi hatred.

“At the age of nine, I was thrown out of the one thing that I loved most, my school, because I was a Jew. And from that day, my world changed, and so did the world,” she said.

She then shared her experiences in a ghetto after being forced there with fellow Hungarian Jews.

“I didn’t even know what a ghetto was, but they made me feel that I had to be punished for something and leave my home,” she said. “The ghetto was a brickyard, but there were no bricks being manufactured. There were just people everywhere suffering.”

Zisblatt also discussed her experiences in Auschwitz, in a labor camp and on a death march.

“I was reduced to a number that represented a nothing. I was stripped of my identity and my dignity,” she said. “That was their first process of dehumanizing us.”

End quote

May 3, 2017

May 1945 — Germans surrender

Filed under: Germany, Uncategorized, World War II — Tags: — furtherglory @ 10:26 am

Execution of 16 Year Old German Heinz Petry by the US Fire Squad 

We are lucky to have someone commenting on my blog, who served as a German solderer in World War II, and was an eye witnesses to the end of war.  My blog post today includes material from his blog which you can read in full by following the links provided.

The two links are a two part account of HK Stolpmann of those days.  The second link is from his account of his experience on May 9th 1945.  The first link is about the general mistreatment and often execution of German youth at the end of the war.  I have selected a few highlights, but those interested in learning more about those days should definitely follow these links.

http://dachaukz.blogspot.com/2011/03/my-own-surrender-to-3rd-us-army-9th-may.html

Begin quote from the above link:

It was an entirely different position the Allies took when HJ [Hitler Youth] members were captured or surrendered in their original uniform, with their swastika armband on their sleeves….

These boys had no rights under any rules to be treated as POW’s when captured and were faced with summary execution.

End quote

http://dachaukz.blogspot.co.nz/2011/03/sonndorf-pow-camp-to-dachau-kz.html

Begin quote:

The final act was  signed in Berlin together with the Russians in the morning of May the 8th.  At that time my platoon of 15 boys and one Officer, Lieutenant Becker marched towards the German border from within Czechoslovakia in the area of Schuettenhofen.  There was a sort of no-mans land and all troop movements were strictly forbidden, we did not adhere to this order. As we had thrown all our weapons down to comply to Doenitz’s command, except our Lt. who carried his MP38 to protect us to some degree against Czech partisan’s ambushes when [on May 9th 1945] we met the first American soldiers confronting a massive column of tired and dejected Germans that all were trying to avoid capture by the Russians.  I have never seen my Lieutenant ever since.

End quote.

Further down in the same blog post, Stolpmann continues:

Begin quote

At that time we did not know that Eisenhower had issued an order on March 10th 1945 and verified by his initials on a cable of that date, that German Prisoners of War be predesignated as “Disarmed Enemy Forces” or DEF.  Eisenhower  ordered that these Germans did not fall under the Geneva Convention, and were not to be fed or given water or medical attention. The Swiss Red Cross was not to inspect the camps, for under the DEF classification, they had no such authority or jurisdiction.

End Quote.

Stolpmann remembered about these days in a recent comment on this blog:

…’Unser Führer ist gefallen’ – which means ‘[Our Führer died in combat action’]

Indeed I did find a scrap of newspaper while spending the first days as a POW (DEF) in Sonndorf, which claimed that our beloved leader with the flag in one hand and a rifle in the other died fighting for the glory of our people and the Third Reich. Beside it was one of the first actual accounts of another newsprint that Hitler had committed suicide in his bunker prior to marrying Eva Brown!

I was so disgusted by what I felt was American propaganda that I tore the paper to pieces and held the other one to my chest, proud of my Führer!

So much for brainwashing.

End quote.

May 2, 2017

May 1, 1945

Filed under: Germany, World War II — furtherglory @ 11:04 am

 

I blogged about this subject yesterday.

One of my readers found a much better video of the same topic, with English subtitles.  It is a recording of the German radio announcement of Hitler’s death.

May 1, 2017

Radio Announcement on May 1, 1945

Filed under: Germany, World War II — furtherglory @ 7:31 am

 

Older Posts »

Blog at WordPress.com.