Scrapbookpages Blog

January 4, 2018

The story of Rudolf Hess (not Rudolf Hoess)

Filed under: Germany, World War II — furtherglory @ 8:25 am

Rudolf Hess is sometimes confused with Rudolf Hoess. Many people mispronounce the name Hoess, which leads to confusion.

Here is the real story:

On May 10, 1941, Hitler’s deputy, Rudolf Hess, flew to Scotland in a Messerschmitt 110 airplane and parachuted out before the plane crash-landed.

Hess made this trip in an attempt to negotiate peace with the British and end the war on the western front, so that Germany could then attack Russia without worrying about fighting on two fronts.

Hess was promptly arrested as soon as his parachute touched the ground, and he was held in prison for the duration of the war. At the Nuremberg International Military Tribunal, after the war, Hess was convicted of Crimes against Peace and sentenced to life in prison.

Finally on June 22, 1941, Germany invaded the Soviet Union in a pre-emptive strike against Communism, or Judeo-Bolshevism, as the Nazis called it, and the killing of innocent Jewish civilians by special soldiers called the Einsatzgruppen began. All of this could have been prevented if the Allies had taken immediate action on March 12, 1938 when Hitler and his troops marched triumphantly into Austria in defiance of the Treaty of Versailles.

The failure of the Allies to act immediately at the first sign of Nazi aggression, and the appeasement of Hitler at Munich in 1938 has been frequently cited by historians and politicians as an object lesson in history whenever new dictators like Miloslovich or Saddam Hussein have emerged to threaten America’s freedom.

According to William Shirer, a famous American correspondent in Europe during that period, there was so little American interest in the fate of Austria that he had a very difficult time persuading CBS to allow him to report the story of the Anschluss on the radio.

End of Story — That’s all she wrote — and she rubbed that out.

December 31, 2017

Oskar Groening is back in the news!

Filed under: Auschwitz, Holocaust, World War II — Tags: — furtherglory @ 8:33 am
Oskar Groening

Poor Oskar looks to old to go to jail.

You can read about Oskar in this 12/31/2017 news article:

http://www.israelnationalnews.com/News/News.aspx/240016

Begin Quote from news article:

He came to attention in 2005 after giving interviews about his work in the camp in an attempt to persuade Holocaust deniers that the genocide had taken place.

End Quote

You can read my many other blog posts about Oskar by following the links below:

https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/tag/oskar-groening/

https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/tag/oskar-groening/page/2/

 

December 24, 2017

Stille Nacht, nice video

Filed under: Germany, Language, Music, World War II — Tags: — furtherglory @ 2:49 pm

Stille Nacht – Heilige Nacht – Wehrmacht Radio 24.12.1942

Filed under: Language, Music, World War II — Tags: — furtherglory @ 2:43 pm

Stille Nacht

Filed under: Language, Music, World War II — Tags: — furtherglory @ 2:33 pm

December 19, 2017

Does Trump’s America mirror Hitler’s Germany?

Filed under: Trump, World War II — furtherglory @ 4:06 pm

You can read all about it in this news article: https://www.salon.com/2017/12/19/frightening-ways-trumps-america-mirrors-hitlers-germany_partner/

The following quote is from the news article:

Begin quote

President Obama has come right out and said it: “You have to tend to this garden of democracy, otherwise things can fall apart fairly quickly. And we’ve seen societies where that happens.”

Yes, he invoked Nazi Germany, adding, “Now, presumably, there was a ballroom in Vienna in the late 1920s or ’30s that looked and seemed as if it ― filled with the music and art and literature and the science that was emerging ― would continue into perpetuity. And then 60 million people died. And the entire world was plunged into chaos.”

End quote

Were the Nazis responsible for killing 60 million people? Or was it only 6 million people?

The news article continues with this quote:

Begin quote

It was a shocking reminder of Milton Mayer and his seminal work, They Thought They Were Free, first published back in 1955 by the University of Chicago Press.

Shortly after World War II, Mayer, an American journalist and college instructor, went to Germany and befriended a small group of 10 “ordinary Germans” who had lived and worked through the war, and interviewed them in depth.

Mayer’s burning question was, “How does something like Nazi Germany happen?”

What he learned was every bit as shocking as President Obama drawing the same parallels. He wrote, presciently, “Now I see a little better how Nazism overcame Germany – not by attack from without or by subversion from within, but with a whoop and a holler. It was what most Germans wanted – or, under pressure of combined reality and illusion, came to want. They wanted it; they got it; and they liked it.

“I came home a little bit afraid for my country, afraid of what it might want, and get, and like, under combined pressure of reality and illusion. I felt – and feel – that it was not German Man that I met, but Man. He happened to

It was a shocking reminder of Milton Mayer and his seminal work, They Thought They Were Free, first published back in 1955 by the University of Chicago Press.

Shortly after World War II, Mayer, an American journalist and college instructor, went to Germany and befriended a small group of 10 “ordinary Germans” who had lived and worked through the war, and interviewed them in depth.

Mayer’s burning question was, “How does something like Nazi Germany happen?”

What he learned was every bit as shocking as President Obama drawing the same parallels. He wrote, presciently, “Now I see a little better how Nazism overcame Germany – not by attack from without or by subversion from within, but with a whoop and a holler. It was what most Germans wanted – or, under pressure of combined reality and illusion, came to want. They wanted it; they got it; and they liked it.

“I came home a little bit afraid for my country, afraid of what it might want, and get, and like, under combined pressure of reality and illusion. I felt – and feel – that it was not German Man that I met, but Man. He happened to be in Germany under certain conditions. He might be here under certain conditions. He might, under certain conditions, be I.

“If I – and my countrymen – ever succumbed to that concatenation of conditions, no Constitution, no laws, no police, and certainly no army would be able to protect us from harm.”

Mayer tells the story largely through the words of the Germans he got to know during his year in Germany after the war.  One, a college professor, told him:

“What happened here was the gradual habituation of the people, little by little, to being governed by surprise; to receiving decisions deliberated in secret; to believing that the situation was so complicated that the government had to act on information which the people could not understand, or so dangerous that, even if the people could understand it, it could not be released because of national security. . .

“This separation of government from people, this widening of the gap, took place so gradually and so insensibly, each step disguised (perhaps not even intentionally) as a temporary emergency measure or associated with true patriotic allegiance or with real social purposes. And all the crises and reforms (real reforms, too) so occupied the people that they did not see the slow motion underneath, of the whole process of government growing remoter and remoter. . . .

“To live in this process is absolutely not to be able to notice it – please try to believe me – unless one has a much greater degree of political awareness, acuity, than most of us had ever had occasion to develop.

“Each step was so small, so inconsequential, so well explained or, on occasion, ‘regretted,’ that, unless one were detached from the whole process from the beginning, unless one understood what the whole thing was in principle, what all these ‘little measures’ that no ‘patriotic German’ could resent must some day lead to, one no more saw it developing from day to day than a farmer in his field sees the corn growing. One day it is over his head.”

End quote

December 16, 2017

The truth about the “Buchenwald war criminals”

Filed under: Buchenwald, Germany, Holocaust, World War II — furtherglory @ 11:27 am

I have a section on my website about the Buchenwald camp, which you can read at http://www.scrapbookpages.com/Buchenwald/index.html

You can read about the alleged Buchenwald atrocities in this section of my website: http://www.scrapbookpages.com/Buchenwald/Atrocities.html

After World War II ended, the Nazi concentration camps were declared to be a “criminal enterprise” by the Allies. Under the new Allied concept of “co-responsibility” which was used in all the World War II war crimes trials, anyone who had worked in any one of the German camps, in any capacity, was a war criminal.

The 31 accused persons, in the Buchenwald war crimes trial, included at least one person who represented each job title in the camp.

The relatively low number of Buchenwald war criminals might have been due to the fact that 76 of the SS staff members had been hunted down and killed by the inmates with the help of the Americans after the camp was liberatorated.

It was not a war crime for American soldiers to kill German POWs at that time because General Dwight D. Eisenhower had had the foresight in March 1945 to designate all future German POWs as Disarmed Enemy Forces in order to get around the rules of the Geneva Convention of 1929, which America had signed.

December 7, 2017

Happy Chelmno Day! December 7th 1941

Filed under: Holocaust, World War II — Tags: — furtherglory @ 12:23 pm

Chelmno was not in the news today.  I know because I did a search.  Funny because there is a connection between the camp and December 7th 1941.

Tombstones stacked against wall of Museum

Tombstones stacked against the wall of Museum at the former Chelmno camp

According to Holocaust historian Martin Gilbert, the “Final Solution” began when 700 Jews from the Polish village of Kolo arrived at Chelmno on the evening of December 7, 1941 and on the following day, all of them were killed with carbon monoxide in gas vans. The victims were taken on 8 or 9 separate journeys in the gas vans to a clearing in the Rzuchowski woods near the town of Chelmno.

In his book entitled “Holocaust,” Martin Gilbert wrote the following:

Begin quote

On 7 December 1941, as the first seven hundred Jews were being deported to the death camp at Chelmno, Japanese aircraft attacked the United States Fleet at Pearl Harbor. Unknown at that time either to the Allies or the Jews of Europe, Roosevelt’s day that would “live in infamy” was also the first day of the “final solution.”

End quote

You can read all about Chelmno on my web site at

http://www.scrapbookpages.com/Poland/Chelmno/index.html

You can follow the link below to read more about this day in history.  I have not tagged all my posts on Pearl Harbor yet, but there are a good number you can read. Follow the link bellow:

https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/tag/pearl-harbor/

Chelmno is one of the few camps that I have never visited. I did some research on the camp, and I was told that the former camp is now a hangout for thieves. I was told that if I went there, I would be robbed and raped and left to die beside the road.

December 6, 2017

Jews getting more restitution is back in the news!

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust, Language, World War II — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 12:28 pm

On December 6th, 2017 the Jewish Telegraph Agency published an article entitled “Senate committee advances restitution bill for Holocaust survivors” which you can read in full by following the link below:

https://www.jta.org/2017/12/06/news-opinion/united-states/senate-committee-advances-restitution-bill-for-holocaust-survivors

Begin quote

The JUST Act is designed to build on the international Terezin Declaration on Holocaust Era Assets and Related Issues of 2009, which affirms that the protection of property rights is an essential component of a democratic society based on the rule of law and recognizes the importance of restituting or compensating Holocaust-related confiscations made during the Holocaust-era between 1933 and 1945.

End quote

So what else is new?  For one thing, I notice that “restituting” has now become a verb.

Here is an example of this new verbs used in a sentence.  Victims of Jewing are restituting even more cash.

A German woman is seen here  “Restituting” herself!

https://www.standard.co.uk/news/uk/this-99yearold-holocaust-survivor-who-was-imprisoned-for-being-gay-doesn-t-deserve-compensation-a3711591.html

I copied the above picture from another article on Wolfgang Lauinger, published in the Evening Standard on December 6th, 2017, which you can read by following the link above.

December 4, 2017

Alleged Shinder’s list survivor unable to identify Amon Goeth

Filed under: Holocaust, World War II — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 1:19 pm
https://i2.wp.com/www.telegram.com/storyimage/WT/20171204/ITEM/171209953/AR/0/AR-171209953.jpg

Rena Finder was born in Krakow, Poland, in 1929

http://www.telegram.com/item/20171204/schindlers-list-survivor-tells-her-tale-at-clinton-middle-school

You can read Rena’s tale in the  Dec 4th Telegram news article linked to above.

Begin Quote from Telegram news article

“After the Holocaust was over, and someone showed me a picture of [Amon] Goeth, I did not know who he was. I was too afraid to ever look him in the face, so I never knew what he looked like.” The one thing she did notice about him was that he had two very large dogs, that were vicious themselves. She claims that large dogs still scare her to this day….

She claims that the award winning film [Schindler’s List], produced by Steven Spielberg, is exactly what life was like during that time.

End Quote.

Her inability to identify Amon Goeth from a photo, and her belief that it was exactly like in the fictional movie makes me think she was never really in Plaszow.

https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/tag/schindlers-list/

Click on the link above to see many other articles about Schindler’s list.  You can also click on the link below to read several other articles I have written about Rena Finder.

https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/tag/rena-finder/

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