Scrapbookpages Blog

November 15, 2017

“Erika” Afrikaans

Filed under: Language, Music, World War II — Tags: , — furtherglory @ 11:27 am

 

I blogged about another rendition of this song which you can view here:

https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2017/07/19/auf-der-heide-bluht-ein-kleines-blumelein/

I like this new version of a classic German marching song.

Rommel was noted for being a very handsome man, as shown in the photo below:

Erwin_Rommel.jpg

Great footage of Rommel in this rendition.

Below are the lyrics if you would like to sing along!  You can also read about this song on Wikipedia by following the link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erika_(song)

Auf der Heide blüht ein kleines Blümelein
und das heißt: Erika.
Heiß von hunderttausend kleinen Bienelein
wird umschwärmt Erika
denn ihr Herz ist voller Süßigkeit,
zarter Duft entströmt dem Blütenkleid.
Auf der Heide blüht ein kleines Blümelein
und das heißt: Erika.

On the heath, there blooms a little flower
and it’s called Erika.
Eagerly a hundred thousand little bees,
swarm around Erika.
For her heart is full of sweetness,
a tender scent escapes her blossom-gown.
On the heath, there blooms a little flower
and it’s called Erika.

In der Heimat wohnt ein kleines Mägdelein
und das heißt: Erika.
Dieses Mädel ist mein treues Schätzelein
und mein Glück, Erika.
Wenn das Heidekraut rot-lila blüht,
singe ich zum Gruß ihr dieses Lied.
Auf der Heide blüht ein kleines Blümelein
und das heißt: Erika.

Back at home, there lives a little maiden
and she’s called Erika.
That girl is my faithful little darling
and my joy, Erika!
When the heather blooms in a reddish purple,
I sing her this song in greeting.
On the heath, there blooms a little flower
and it’s called Erika.

In mein’m Kämmerlein blüht auch ein Blümelein
und das heißt: Erika.
Schon beim Morgengrau’n sowie beim Dämmerschein
schaut’s mich an, Erika.
Und dann ist es mir, als spräch’ es laut:
“Denkst du auch an deine kleine Braut?”
In der Heimat weint um dich ein Mägdelein
und das heißt: Erika.

In my room, there also blooms a little flower
and it’s called Erika.
Already In the grey of dawn, as it does at dusk,
It looks at me, Erika!
And then it’s to me as if it’s saying aloud:
“Are you thinking of your fiancée?”
Back at home, a maiden weeps for you
and she’s called Erika.

November 3, 2017

Students disrespect Holocaust Museum exhibits

Filed under: Auschwitz, Germany, Language — furtherglory @ 4:04 pm

I am writing today about a news article which was published recently: http://www.foxnews.com/us/2017/11/03/school-probes-student-mockery-holocaust-museum-exhibits.html

The following quote is from the article:

Begin quote

A Pennsylvania school district is investigating complaints that students on a class trip to the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum posted pictures making light of some exhibits.

Superintendent Ed Bowser of the Forest Hills School District said Friday officials are looking into social media posts from the senior class trip Wednesday to the Washington, D.C., museum.

Senior class president Gage Singer tells The Associated Press that most students were respectful, but a small number “made a mockery of what they saw,” including in a Snapchat post of shoes confiscated from concentration camp prisoners.

In a letter posted online, Singer called the conduct “unacceptable,” and apologized on behalf of the entire class.

Bowser says any student discipline will be handled privately.

Forest Hills is about 80 miles (129 kilometers) east of Pittsburgh.

End quote

These students should have been given instructions, in advance, about how to act in a Holocaust Museum. As for myself, when I am in a Holocaust Museum, I keep saying silently to myself: “Don’t laugh, don’t laugh.” This has saved me from being arrested when I have visited Holocaust Museums.

Many years ago, I wrote about my visit to the Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, DC on this page of my website: http://www.scrapbookpages.com/USHMM/Exhibits.html

The following quote is from my website:

The permanent exhibit at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, DC has the world’s largest collection of Holocaust photographs and artifacts, displayed on three floors of the museum, covering 36,000 square feet.

Visitors are allowed to take their own self-guided tour and spend as much time as they want looking at the 2,500 photographs and 900 artifacts. The exhibit includes 70 video monitors, 30 interactive stations and 3 video projection theaters.

There are no tour guides leading large groups and disturbing the quiet contemplation of the other visitors. The exhibits are in chronological order, beginning with the Nazi rise to power in 1933 and ending with the founding of Eretz Israel in 1948.

Each of the three floors of the exhibit has a theme, starting with The Nazi Assault – 1933 – 1939 on the fourth floor, moving on to The Final Solution – 1940 – 1945 on the third floor and ending with The Last Chapter on the second floor. To see the whole exhibit requires at least one to three hours.

According to the museum’s designer, “the primary purpose is to communicate concepts,” not just to display objects. At the end of the tour, visitors must enter the 6,000 square foot Hall of Remembrance, which has 6 sides symbolizing the 6-point Star of David, and the 6 death camps where 6 million Jews were murdered by the Nazis.

As you enter from the 14th Street entrance and walk down the hallway on the main floor, the first place you come to on the left-hand side is the room where the elevators to the permanent exhibit are located. To your right in this room is a table with a box of 500 different booklets, which look vaguely like passports, with the museum logo printed on the cover.

Each visitor is asked to select a passport, which has the name and picture of a real person who experienced the Holocaust. As you proceed through the exhibit, you are supposed to turn the pages in the booklet to find out what happened to this person, whose identity you have assumed. I visited the museum twice on two successive days so I got two passports. I did not see any place to turn in these booklets at the end of the tour, so I assume that they were intended to be souvenirs.

End quote

October 9, 2017

It’s is short for it is or it has

Filed under: Language — furtherglory @ 12:10 pm

There has been a discussion recently on my blog about the use of the word it’s. One of my blog readers wrote: “Next “hateful” comment: an ambulance would be on it’s way — its, not it’s.”

I looked it up and found this website which explains the difference between the use of these two words:

http://www.grammar-monster.com/easily_confused/its_its.htm

The following was copied from the website above:

Begin quote

It’s and Its

There is often confusion between its and it’s. If you delve deeper into this issue, you will see that there is good reason for the confusion. However, if you just want to know what is right, the matter is very simple.

It’s

It’s is short for it is or it has. This is a 100% rule. It cannot be used for anything else.

September 18, 2017

Oktoberfest Contest

Filed under: Germany, Language, Music — furtherglory @ 5:16 pm

Click on the link in the photo above to hear a famous German song that is sung in beer joints. I have sung this song in German, in Germany. I have also danced to this song many times.

This is to announce a contest:  Winners will win by suggesting a German drinking song traditionally sung during Oktoberfest.

It has to be a song that I like enough to elevate from a comment to an outstanding comment, that has been elevated to the level of a blog post, in it’s own right, with the names of each winner announced!

July 22, 2017

100 Mann und ein Befehl

Filed under: Language, Music, World War II — Tags: — furtherglory @ 9:52 am

This song was suggested by a reader who said this in an outstanding comment, which you can read by clicking on the link below:

https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2017/07/21/hes-not-heavy-hes-my-brother/#comment-81696

I like the classic WW2 footage that comes with the rendition above.

I have also linked to the classic 1966 Heidi Brühl version

Begin quote from the outstanding comment:

There was another song that used the same tune as “Green Berets”, but it was anti-war and it was in German.

The song was “Hundert Mann und ein Befehl”. by Freddy Quinn…

…..and here are the English lyrics:

Hundert Mann und ein Befehl

English translation

Somewhere in a foreign land,

they wander through rock and sand,

far from home and fair game,

100 men and he’s there as well

100 men and one command

and a way that no one wants,

day in, day out, to who knows where,

burned land and what’s the use?

All alone in the dark night,

you have often thought about it,

that far from here the full moon shines

and far from here a young girl cries.

And the world is still so beautiful.

If I could see you just once.

Now separating us already a long year,

because a command was our doom.

At random the fate strikes down.

Today him and tomorrow you.

I hear from afar the crows cawing

in the dawn, why does that have to be?

End quote from the outstanding comment

 

July 19, 2017

Auf der Heide blüht ein kleines Blümelein

Filed under: Germany, Language, Music, Uncategorized, World War II — Tags: — furtherglory @ 11:19 am

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erika_(song)

Auf der Heide blüht ein kleines Blümelein
und das heißt: Erika.
Heiß von hunderttausend kleinen Bienelein
wird umschwärmt Erika
denn ihr Herz ist voller Süßigkeit,
zarter Duft entströmt dem Blütenkleid.
Auf der Heide blüht ein kleines Blümelein
und das heißt: Erika.

On the heath, there blooms a little flower
and it’s called Erika.
Eagerly a hundred thousand little bees,
swarm around Erika.
For her heart is full of sweetness,
a tender scent escapes her blossom-gown.
On the heath, there blooms a little flower
and it’s called Erika.

In der Heimat wohnt ein kleines Mägdelein
und das heißt: Erika.
Dieses Mädel ist mein treues Schätzelein
und mein Glück, Erika.
Wenn das Heidekraut rot-lila blüht,
singe ich zum Gruß ihr dieses Lied.
Auf der Heide blüht ein kleines Blümelein
und das heißt: Erika.

Back at home, there lives a little maiden
and she’s called Erika.
That girl is my faithful little darling
and my joy, Erika!
When the heather blooms in a reddish purple,
I sing her this song in greeting.
On the heath, there blooms a little flower
and it’s called Erika.

In mein’m Kämmerlein blüht auch ein Blümelein
und das heißt: Erika.
Schon beim Morgengrau’n sowie beim Dämmerschein
schaut’s mich an, Erika.
Und dann ist es mir, als spräch’ es laut:
“Denkst du auch an deine kleine Braut?”
In der Heimat weint um dich ein Mägdelein
und das heißt: Erika.

In my room, there also blooms a little flower
and it’s called Erika.
Already In the grey of dawn, as it does at dusk,
It looks at me, Erika!
And it is as if it spoke aloud:
“Are you thinking of your fiancée?”
Back at home, a maiden weeps for you
and she’s called Erika.

July 10, 2017

Auferstanden aus Ruinen

Filed under: Germany, Language, Music, World War II — Tags: — furtherglory @ 4:27 pm

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Auferstanden_aus_Ruinen

https://www.quora.com/Should-Auferstanden-Aus-Ruinen-be-the-song-of-the-President-of-Germany

I like this rendition of the song.  Unfortunately, I have not been able find a version with both English and German subtitles.  This version has no subtitles at all, but I really liked the black and white historical video that accompanies the song.

July 9, 2017

Ich Bin ein Hamburger

Filed under: Food, Germany, Language — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 11:46 am

The title of my blog post today is the way that a German person might say that they live in the city of Hamburg in Germany.

In the video below, a German woman is shown, as she pronounces the name of the city known as Hamburg.

I have set the video to start at 35 seconds in, when you can hear the German woman start speaking.  She is speaking about the devastation that took place in the city of Hamburg.  Even if you can’t understand what she is saying, you can still view the photos.

In the photo below, you can see an American food that is known as a Hamburger.  American news reporters sometimes pronounce the name of the German City and the name of the American food the same way, but if you listen carefully to the woman in the video, the German pronunciation  of Hamburg sounds very different.

This is an American hamberger

SS marschiert in Freindesland

This version above has both English and German subtitles! It also features modern CGI graphics clips from Girls und Panzer.

The version below has German subtitles plus subtitles in some other language. I believe it is Spanish.  Some may prefer the more classic WW2 black and white footage that accompanies the music.  Both videos have the exact same sound track.

 

You can read more about this song on Wikipedia, including a translation of the words into English.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Devil%27s_song

Or you can vote in the comments on which rendition you like?

 

July 8, 2017

Horst Wessel Lied

Filed under: Germany, Language, Music, Uncategorized — furtherglory @ 9:31 am

These lyrics below, and the catchy tune you can hear in the short video above, might have been sung by the police as they battled communists and anarchists in the streets of Hamburg these last few days.  Maybe you would like to take a couple of minutes and hear this rendition.

Comrades shot by Red Front and reactionaries, march in spirit within our ranks.

Kam’raden, die Rotfront und Reaktion erschossen, Marschier’n im Geist in unser’n Reihen mit

Too bad this song is illegal in Germany today.  You can read more about it by clicking on the link below.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horst-Wessel-Lied

 

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