Scrapbookpages Blog

December 24, 2017

Stille Nacht, nice video

Filed under: Germany, Language, Music, World War II — Tags: — furtherglory @ 2:49 pm

Stille Nacht – Heilige Nacht – Wehrmacht Radio 24.12.1942

Filed under: Language, Music, World War II — Tags: — furtherglory @ 2:43 pm

Stille Nacht

Filed under: Language, Music, World War II — Tags: — furtherglory @ 2:33 pm

December 9, 2017

Does Setting Your Twitter Location to Germany Block Nazi Content?

Filed under: Germany, Language — Tags: , — furtherglory @ 12:51 pm

https://www.snopes.com/twitter-germany-nazis/

I was reading an interesting article today about how twitter accounts are blocked in Germany.  You can read the article in full and also watch an interesting video by clicking on the link above.

The line of thinking in the article is that you might want to set your location as Germany to block these annoying tweets.

Begin quote from Snopes

CLAIM

Changing your Twitter profile’s country setting to Germany will cause Nazi-related accounts to be blocked from view.

RATING

MOSTLY TRUE

WHAT’S TRUE

Certain national socialist, white nationalist and Nazi Twitter profiles are “withheld” from view when viewed by a Twitter user whose country is set to Germany.

WHAT’S FALSE

The change in settings is not entirely effective, and some Nazi-related accounts and content will persist.

End quote from Snopes.

A sample screen shot from twitter which appears in the article.

The interesting article concludes with the following,

Begin quote from Snopes

Against this background, Germany implemented a new law in October 2017 which specifically targets hate speech and incitement to hatred published on social media platforms, and allows the state to fine technology companies up to €50 million ($59 million) if they fail to quickly remove violating content.

Twitter describes its policy on “country withheld content” in this way:

Many countries, including the United States, have laws that may apply to Tweets and/or Twitter account content. In our continuing effort to make our services available to users everywhere, if we receive a valid and properly scoped request from an authorized entity, it may be necessary to reactively withhold access to certain content in a particular country from time to time.

It’s not clear whether an “authorized entity” means a state entity (i.e. law enforcement or prosecutors), or a private group or individual could also prompt Twitter to withhold content in a given country.

It’s also unclear whether accounts are withheld on the basis of certain keywords in a profile description or handle, or only on the basis of tweets, and whether an official entity must alert Twitter to content that might constitute a criminal offense, or the company itself proactively withholds accounts and tweets.

End quote from Snopes.

 

December 6, 2017

Jews getting more restitution is back in the news!

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust, Language, World War II — Tags: , , — furtherglory @ 12:28 pm

On December 6th, 2017 the Jewish Telegraph Agency published an article entitled “Senate committee advances restitution bill for Holocaust survivors” which you can read in full by following the link below:

https://www.jta.org/2017/12/06/news-opinion/united-states/senate-committee-advances-restitution-bill-for-holocaust-survivors

Begin quote

The JUST Act is designed to build on the international Terezin Declaration on Holocaust Era Assets and Related Issues of 2009, which affirms that the protection of property rights is an essential component of a democratic society based on the rule of law and recognizes the importance of restituting or compensating Holocaust-related confiscations made during the Holocaust-era between 1933 and 1945.

End quote

So what else is new?  For one thing, I notice that “restituting” has now become a verb.

Here is an example of this new verbs used in a sentence.  Victims of Jewing are restituting even more cash.

A German woman is seen here  “Restituting” herself!

https://www.standard.co.uk/news/uk/this-99yearold-holocaust-survivor-who-was-imprisoned-for-being-gay-doesn-t-deserve-compensation-a3711591.html

I copied the above picture from another article on Wolfgang Lauinger, published in the Evening Standard on December 6th, 2017, which you can read by following the link above.

December 1, 2017

Sieg Heil Viktoria

Filed under: Germany, Language, Music, World War II — Tags: — furtherglory @ 7:37 am

November 25, 2017

Volk ans Gewehr

Filed under: Language, Music, World War II — Tags: — furtherglory @ 8:16 am

One thing I like about this video is that it has the German lyrics printed out at the bottom of the screen so that we can all sing along.

November 22, 2017

RusslandLied

Filed under: Language, Music, World War II — Tags: — furtherglory @ 12:10 pm

New rendition of a classic German marching song just released!

November 15, 2017

“Erika” Afrikaans

Filed under: Language, Music, World War II — Tags: , — furtherglory @ 11:27 am

 

I blogged about another rendition of this song which you can view here:

https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2017/07/19/auf-der-heide-bluht-ein-kleines-blumelein/

I like this new version of a classic German marching song.

Rommel was noted for being a very handsome man, as shown in the photo below:

Erwin_Rommel.jpg

Great footage of Rommel in this rendition.

Below are the lyrics if you would like to sing along!  You can also read about this song on Wikipedia by following the link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erika_(song)

Auf der Heide blüht ein kleines Blümelein
und das heißt: Erika.
Heiß von hunderttausend kleinen Bienelein
wird umschwärmt Erika
denn ihr Herz ist voller Süßigkeit,
zarter Duft entströmt dem Blütenkleid.
Auf der Heide blüht ein kleines Blümelein
und das heißt: Erika.

On the heath, there blooms a little flower
and it’s called Erika.
Eagerly a hundred thousand little bees,
swarm around Erika.
For her heart is full of sweetness,
a tender scent escapes her blossom-gown.
On the heath, there blooms a little flower
and it’s called Erika.

In der Heimat wohnt ein kleines Mägdelein
und das heißt: Erika.
Dieses Mädel ist mein treues Schätzelein
und mein Glück, Erika.
Wenn das Heidekraut rot-lila blüht,
singe ich zum Gruß ihr dieses Lied.
Auf der Heide blüht ein kleines Blümelein
und das heißt: Erika.

Back at home, there lives a little maiden
and she’s called Erika.
That girl is my faithful little darling
and my joy, Erika!
When the heather blooms in a reddish purple,
I sing her this song in greeting.
On the heath, there blooms a little flower
and it’s called Erika.

In mein’m Kämmerlein blüht auch ein Blümelein
und das heißt: Erika.
Schon beim Morgengrau’n sowie beim Dämmerschein
schaut’s mich an, Erika.
Und dann ist es mir, als spräch’ es laut:
“Denkst du auch an deine kleine Braut?”
In der Heimat weint um dich ein Mägdelein
und das heißt: Erika.

In my room, there also blooms a little flower
and it’s called Erika.
Already In the grey of dawn, as it does at dusk,
It looks at me, Erika!
And then it’s to me as if it’s saying aloud:
“Are you thinking of your fiancée?”
Back at home, a maiden weeps for you
and she’s called Erika.

November 3, 2017

Students disrespect Holocaust Museum exhibits

Filed under: Auschwitz, Germany, Language — furtherglory @ 4:04 pm

I am writing today about a news article which was published recently: http://www.foxnews.com/us/2017/11/03/school-probes-student-mockery-holocaust-museum-exhibits.html

The following quote is from the article:

Begin quote

A Pennsylvania school district is investigating complaints that students on a class trip to the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum posted pictures making light of some exhibits.

Superintendent Ed Bowser of the Forest Hills School District said Friday officials are looking into social media posts from the senior class trip Wednesday to the Washington, D.C., museum.

Senior class president Gage Singer tells The Associated Press that most students were respectful, but a small number “made a mockery of what they saw,” including in a Snapchat post of shoes confiscated from concentration camp prisoners.

In a letter posted online, Singer called the conduct “unacceptable,” and apologized on behalf of the entire class.

Bowser says any student discipline will be handled privately.

Forest Hills is about 80 miles (129 kilometers) east of Pittsburgh.

End quote

These students should have been given instructions, in advance, about how to act in a Holocaust Museum. As for myself, when I am in a Holocaust Museum, I keep saying silently to myself: “Don’t laugh, don’t laugh.” This has saved me from being arrested when I have visited Holocaust Museums.

Many years ago, I wrote about my visit to the Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, DC on this page of my website: http://www.scrapbookpages.com/USHMM/Exhibits.html

The following quote is from my website:

The permanent exhibit at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, DC has the world’s largest collection of Holocaust photographs and artifacts, displayed on three floors of the museum, covering 36,000 square feet.

Visitors are allowed to take their own self-guided tour and spend as much time as they want looking at the 2,500 photographs and 900 artifacts. The exhibit includes 70 video monitors, 30 interactive stations and 3 video projection theaters.

There are no tour guides leading large groups and disturbing the quiet contemplation of the other visitors. The exhibits are in chronological order, beginning with the Nazi rise to power in 1933 and ending with the founding of Eretz Israel in 1948.

Each of the three floors of the exhibit has a theme, starting with The Nazi Assault – 1933 – 1939 on the fourth floor, moving on to The Final Solution – 1940 – 1945 on the third floor and ending with The Last Chapter on the second floor. To see the whole exhibit requires at least one to three hours.

According to the museum’s designer, “the primary purpose is to communicate concepts,” not just to display objects. At the end of the tour, visitors must enter the 6,000 square foot Hall of Remembrance, which has 6 sides symbolizing the 6-point Star of David, and the 6 death camps where 6 million Jews were murdered by the Nazis.

As you enter from the 14th Street entrance and walk down the hallway on the main floor, the first place you come to on the left-hand side is the room where the elevators to the permanent exhibit are located. To your right in this room is a table with a box of 500 different booklets, which look vaguely like passports, with the museum logo printed on the cover.

Each visitor is asked to select a passport, which has the name and picture of a real person who experienced the Holocaust. As you proceed through the exhibit, you are supposed to turn the pages in the booklet to find out what happened to this person, whose identity you have assumed. I visited the museum twice on two successive days so I got two passports. I did not see any place to turn in these booklets at the end of the tour, so I assume that they were intended to be souvenirs.

End quote

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