Scrapbookpages Blog

November 20, 2017

Austria accepted it’s Holocaust guilt

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust — furtherglory @ 1:20 pm

You can read about how Austria has accepted it’s Holocaust guilt in this news article:

https://azjewishpost.com/2017/austria-accepted-its-holocaust-guilt-so-why-is-its-far-right-on-the-rise/

The following quote is from the news article:

Begin quote

VIENNA (JTA) — When it comes to the Holocaust, Austria has made a lot of progress assuming responsibility.

In recent years, Austrian officials have consistently acknowledged their country’s support of Adolf Hitler, an Austria native, and his war of annihilation against Jews. In the early 2000s, the government dropped the claim that the country was mostly a victim of German Nazism, citing “the special responsibility imposed on Austria by its recent history.” Instead, teaching about the Holocaust has become mandatory, with visits to former death camps and teacher training in Israel.

Tina Walzer speaking at the inauguration of an artwork about the Holocaust at Vienna’s Herminnengasse subway station, Oct. 19, 2017. (Cnaan Liphshiz)

The government has paid nearly $1 billion since 2005 in compensation to Holocaust victims, and since 2012, Holocaust memorial projects have popped up at an unprecedented rate.

End quote

Will the Germans and the Austrians never learn? They can never be forgiven for putting Jews into camps, no matter what they do.

The Jews believe that they are God’s Chosen People and that they can lie, cheat and steal as much as they want to.

On my scrapbookpages.com website, you can read about the Mauthausen camp where Austrian Jews were sent.

http://www.scrapbookpages.com/Mauthausen/Gas%20Chamber/index.html

Sacramento park — I never promised you a rose garden

Filed under: California — furtherglory @ 11:07 am

Famous rose garden in a very old Sacramento park

The photo below shows what the rose garden in Sacramento used to look like, before it was ruined by drug users.

rosegarden.jpg

In this recent news article you can read about how a famous park in Sacramento, California has been ruined by drug users: http://www.sacbee.com/news/local/news-columns-blogs/citybea/article185288903.html

The following quote is from the news article:

Begin quote

Hypodermic needles are being flushed so often down the toilets in McKinley Park, damaged sewer systems have forced the city to shut down the bathrooms twice in recent months.

City officials think they may have found a fix.

The City Council will consider Tuesday spending $50,000 for a mechanical grinder that would chew up needles and other objects flushed down the toilets in the East Sacramento park. The bathroom is next to the city’s most heavily used playground, and city officials want to avoid permanently shutting down the facility.

Read more here: http://www.sacbee.com/news/local/news-columns-blogs/city-beat/article185288903.html#storylink=cpy
I have many happy memories of taking my children to this park to walk among the roses. Those days are gone for today’s children.

Charles Manson — dead at 83

Filed under: True Crime — furtherglory @ 9:25 am

You can read about the death of Charles Manson at

http://ewn.co.za/2017/11/20/watch-charles-manson-dead-at-83

Charles Manson had a swastika carved on his forehead. He wanted to be known as a killer, but he never killed anyone himself. He ordered his young women followers to go out and kill.

The most famous crime that Manson ordered was the death of Sharon Tate who was 8 and 1/2 months pregnant when she died. The Black Panthers were accused of this crime.

For some strange reason, beautiful young girls became Manson’s followers. Group sex was mandatory.

How many young people today know who Charles Manson was — not many, I am guessing.

 

November 19, 2017

Warsaw Ghetto museum will soon be built

Filed under: Holocaust — furtherglory @ 1:43 pm

You can read here about the new museum that will be built soon: http://www.hurriyetdailynews.com/poland-to-build-warsaw-ghetto-museum-122649

The following quote is from the article:

Begin quote

Poland will build a museum focused on life and death in the infamous World War II-era Warsaw Ghetto, where Nazi Germany imprisoned nearly 500,000 Jews during the Holocaust, a minister said on Nov. 17.

“The museum will be located in a building that had been used as a children’s hospital inside the ghetto and will be established in collaboration with the Jewish Historical Institute,” Culture Minister Piotr Glinski told reporters, without specifying a timeline.

“It was the largest ghetto in the Nazi-occupied Europe and the most tragic, there is so much to tell,” Pawel Spiewak, who heads the Jewish Historical Institute, told AFP.

The former hospital, located in the heart of the Polish capital, stands right next to the only remaining fragment of the ghetto wall.

Janusz Korczak, a renowned pre-war Polish-Jewish children’s author and pediatrician, worked at the hospital before the war.

The innovative educator who cared for orphans in the Warsaw Ghetto, died along with his young charges in the gas chambers of the Treblinka death camp.

He and the nearly 200 orphans in his care were among the 260,000 Jews who perished in the ghetto’s liquidation, launched in July 1942.

A year after invading Poland on September, 1 1939, Nazi Germany set up the Warsaw Ghetto in the heart of the occupied Polish capital in October 1940.

End quote

I have a section on my scrapbookpages.com website about the Warsaw Ghetto: http://www.scrapbookpages.com/Poland/WarsawGhetto/index.html

Start by reading this page on my website:

http://www.scrapbookpages.com/Poland/WarsawGhetto/Introduction.html

The following quote is from my website:

Before World War II started on September 1, 1939, there were 375,000 Jews living in Warsaw, as many as in all of France, and more than in the whole country of Czechoslovakia. Only the city of New York had a larger Jewish population than Warsaw.

The first Jews had settled in Warsaw after King Kasimierz the Great welcomed Jewish refugees from Western Europe to Poland in the 14th century, but during the 15th century they were expelled from the city of Warsaw, just as they were in Krakow. Between 1527 and 1768, Jews were banned from living in Warsaw.

After Poland was partitioned for the third time in 1795 between Russia, Prussia and Austria, the Jews began coming back to Warsaw, which was in the Russian section, and by the start of World War I, Jews made up forty percent of the population of the city. During the 19th century and up until the end of World War I, Warsaw was in the Pale of Settlement where all Russian Jews were forced to live; when Poland regained its independence after World War I, Warsaw was once again a Polish city. From the beginning, the Jewish district was located southeast of Old Town Warsaw.

The Nazis liked to take action against the Jews on Jewish holidays, so it was on Yom Kippur, the Jewish Day of Atonement, that the announcement was made on October 12, 1940 that “Jewish residential quarters” were to be set up in Warsaw. The Ghetto would comprise 2.4 percent of the city’s land, but would contain 30% of the city’s population, according to the U.S. Holocaust Museum. To create the Ghetto, the Nazis moved 113,000 Christian residents out and moved 138,000 Jewish residents in. The rest of the Warsaw Jews were already living in the neighborhood of the Ghetto.

END QUOTE

 

The story of Bergen-Belsen

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust — furtherglory @ 10:10 am

Years ago, I wanted to visit Bergen-Belsen, so I called a cab and said to the driver: “take me to Bergen-Belsen”. He said “which one — Bergen or Belsen”. I was stumped. I didn’t know that Bergen and Belsen were two different places.

All of this came back to me today, when I read this news article: http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/newslocal/central-sydney/holocaust-survivor-olga-horek-shares-story-of-liberation-as-jewish-museum-celebrates-25-years/news-story/61a9cf16d86a4cec72ba71bdb3530694

The following quote is from the news article:

Begin quote

When Olga Horak was liberated from the Holocaust camp Bergen-Belsen in 1945 she had lost her whole family. She was 16 years old, had typhus, weighed 29kg and was carrying a blanket.

The blanket was made by her fellow death camp prisoners, who had been forced to weave their own hair with wool to make a warm covering for their Nazi wardens.

When the camp was liberated by British and Canadian forces, the Nazis fled, leaving behind a decimated population of Jews from all over Europe and importantly for Horak, the blanket.

End quote

Olga Horak is shown in the photo below

For Mrs. Horak, who survived five death camps, the blanket and the museum serve as a powerful reminder: we must never forget.

[My comment: How does one survive 5 death camps? Are Jews that hard to kill?]

“I feel compelled to talk about it, to teach the younger generation in order never to forget what happened,” Mrs Horak said.

“This is history, it cannot be erased and … as long as we can talk, we do ask the people who are willing to listen to us to listen,” she said.

Founded by the late John Saunders AO and members of the Australian Association of Jewish Holocaust Survivors and Descendants in 1992, the museum has grown over the past 25 years to become an integral part of the cultural life of Sydney and a second home to many Holocaust survivors.

End quote

November 18, 2017

“We live in a post 9-11 world”

Filed under: True Crime — furtherglory @ 9:13 am

The title of my blog post today [“we live in a post 911 world”] is the words spoken by a news caster on TV this morning.

I interpret these words to mean that you never know when a foreign government will fly planes over buildings in New York city, for no reason at all, and destroy these buildings, killing hundreds of innocent people in the process.

Fortunately, this has happened only once in America, and will probably never happen again.

On that September day, I remember “the dancing Israelis” who were watching the planes hit the buildings, while laughing  and dancing around.

On that day, I had just gotten up at 6 0’clock in the morning, as usual, and turned on the TV set in my bedroom. I called my daughter and told her not to go out of the house because America was under attack. What else could it be? No one attacks his own buildings unless that person wants to build newer, better buildings.

So now “we live in a post 911 world” where anything could happen.

November 16, 2017

The gassing of the Hungarian Jews

Filed under: Auschwitz, Holocaust — furtherglory @ 1:01 pm

The Holocaust was mainly the gassing of the Hungarian Jews at Auschwitz. The photo below shows Hungarian men on their first day at Auschwitz-Birkenau. Their heads have been shaved to get rid of any lice that they might have had.

Hungarian  Jewish men who have been humiliated on their first day at Auschwitz

The photo below shows how the Hungarian Jews were humiliated by having to go through a selection process: those who couldn’t work were allegedly sent to the gas chamber immediately upon arrival.

Hungarian Jews had to go through a selection

The photo above, taken at Auschwitz on May 26, 1944, shows the selection process which took place immediately after the Hungarian Jews got off the train inside the Birkenau camp.

The men and women had to line up in two separate lines to be examined by an SS officer who decided who would live and who would be sent immediately to the gas chamber. Note the yellow stars which the Hungarian Jews had been forced to wear on their coats even before they were sent to camps.

The Auschwitz II camp, also known as Birkenau, had enough barracks to accommodate 200,000 prisoners and another section, called Mexico by the prisoners, was under construction. When finished, the new section would have provided housing for 50,000 more prisoners.

According to Daniel Goldhagen, the author of the best-selling book entitled “Hitler’s Willing Executioners,” the Nazis were in a frenzy to complete the genocide of the Jews before the end of the war. Even though the Nazis were desperate for workers in their munitions factories, it was more important to them to carry out the Final Solution to the Jewish Question, according to Goldhagen who wrote the following:

Begin quote from Goldhagen’s book:

Finally, the fidelity of the Germans to their genocidal enterprise was so great as seeming to defy comprehension. Their world was disintegrating around them, yet they persisted in genocidal killing until the end.

End quote

In June 1944, Adolf Eichmann deported 20,000 Hungarian Jews to Auschwitz and then transferred them to the Strasshof labor camp near Vienna. This was an attempt to extort money from the Jewish community in Hungary, according to Laurence Rees who wrote in his book “Auschwitz, a New History,” that Eichmann convinced the Jewish leaders that he was going against orders in making an exception for these Jews and then demanded money for food and medical care because he had saved 20,000 Jews from the gas chambers at Auschwitz.

David Cesarani wrote in “The Last Days,” that Jewish leader Rudolf Kastner was able to prod Eichmann into sending these Jews to Austria where three quarters of them survived the war.

The last mass transport of 14,491 Hungarian Jews to Auschwitz arrived on July 9, 1944, according to a book entitled “Die Zahl der Opfer von Auschwitz,” by Franciszek Piper, the director of the Auschwitz Museum. After this mass transport of Jews left Hungary on July 8, 1944, Horthy ordered the deportation of the Hungarian Jews to stop.

By that time, a minimum of 435,000 Hungarian Jews, mostly those living in the villages and small towns, had been transported to Auschwitz, according to evidence given at the trial of Adolf Eichmann in Jerusalem in 1961 in which transportation lists compiled by Laszlo Ferenczy, the chief of police in Hungary, were introduced.

On July 14, 1944, Adolf Eichmann attempted to deport another 1,500 Jews, but Horthy ordered the train to turn around before it could make it past the Hungarian border. On July 19th, Eichmann ordered the 1,500 Jews to be loaded onto the train again and rushed out of the country.

On August 13, 1944, a small transport of 131 Jews arrived from Hungary at Auschwitz and on August 18, 1944, the last transport of 152 Jews arrived.

In a telegram sent to the Foreign Office in Berlin on July 11, 1944 by Edmund Veesenmayer, it was reported that 55,741 Jews had been deported from Zone V by July 9th, as planned, and that the total number of Jews deported from Zones I through V in Hungary was 437,402

[That’s all she wrote — and she rubbed that out]  The words in an old song from long ago.

Don’t rock the Juke box — I wanna hear me some Jones

Filed under: Music — furtherglory @ 8:16 am

There was a time, long ago, in America when everyone knew who country singer George Jones was. On a Saturday night, half the people in America were sitting a few feet away from their radio, as they listened to George Jones sing.

The following information is from Wikipedia:

George Glenn Jones (September 12, 1931 – April 26, 2013) was an American musician, singer and songwriter. He achieved international fame for his long list of hit records, including his best known song “He Stopped Loving Her Today“, as well as his distinctive voice and phrasing. For the last twenty years of his life, Jones was frequently referred to as the greatest living country singer.[1][2] Country music scholar Bill C. Malone writes, “For the two or three minutes consumed by a song, Jones immerses himself so completely in its lyrics, and in the mood it conveys, that the listener can scarcely avoid becoming similarly involved.” Waylon Jennings expressed a similar opinion in his song “It’s Alright”: “If we all could sound like we wanted to, we’d all sound like George Jones.” The shape of his nose and facial features earned Jones the nickname “The Possum.”[3]

Born in Texas, Jones first heard country music when he was seven and was given a guitar at the age of nine. He married his first wife, Dorothy Bonvillion, in 1950, and was divorced in 1951. He served in the United States Marine Corps and was discharged in 1953. He married Shirley Ann Corley in 1954. In 1959, Jones recorded “White Lightning,” written by J. P. Richardson, which launched his career as a singer. His second marriage ended in divorce in 1968; he married fellow country music singer Tammy Wynette a year later. Many years of alcoholism caused his health to deteriorate severely and led to his missing many performances, earning him the nickname “No Show Jones.”[4] After his divorce from Wynette in 1975, Jones married his fourth wife, Nancy Sepulvado, in 1983 and became mostly sober. Jones died in 2013, aged 81, from hypoxic respiratory failure. During his career, Jones had more than 150 hits, both as a solo artist and in duets with other artists.

End quote from Wikipedia

November 15, 2017

Two German men in their 90ies charged with killing Jews at Stutthof

Filed under: Germany, Holocaust — furtherglory @ 2:39 pm

You can read about the German men, charged with crimes at Stutthof, in the news at

https://www.timesofisrael.com/germany-charges-ex-nazi-camp-guards-over-hundreds-of-deaths/

Many years ago, I wrote the following about the Nazi camp called Stutthof on my website:

Begin quote from my scrapbookpages.com website:

Some of the Jews who were selected for slave labor were sent to the Mauthausen concentration camp in Austria and its sub-camps where they worked in German aircraft factories.

Others were sent to the Stutthof camp near Danzig, according to Martin Gilbert, who wrote the following in his book entitled “Holocaust”:

Begin quote from Martin Gilbert:

On June 17 Veesenmayer telegraphed to Berlin that 340,142 Hungarian Jews had now been deported. A few were relatively fortunate to be selected for the barracks, or even moved out altogether to factories and camps in Germany. On June 19 some 500 Jews, and on June 22 a thousand, were sent to work in factories in the Munich area. […] Ten days later, the first Jews, 2500 women, were deported from Birkenau to Stutthof concentration camp. From Stutthof, they were sent to several hundred factories in the Baltic region. But most Jews sent to Birkenau continued to be gassed.

End quote

The above quote seems to indicate that Stutthof was not a place where Jews were sent to be killed.

“Erika” Afrikaans

Filed under: Language, Music, World War II — Tags: , — furtherglory @ 11:27 am

 

I blogged about another rendition of this song which you can view here:

https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2017/07/19/auf-der-heide-bluht-ein-kleines-blumelein/

I like this new version of a classic German marching song.

Rommel was noted for being a very handsome man, as shown in the photo below:

Erwin_Rommel.jpg

Great footage of Rommel in this rendition.

Below are the lyrics if you would like to sing along!  You can also read about this song on Wikipedia by following the link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erika_(song)

Auf der Heide blüht ein kleines Blümelein
und das heißt: Erika.
Heiß von hunderttausend kleinen Bienelein
wird umschwärmt Erika
denn ihr Herz ist voller Süßigkeit,
zarter Duft entströmt dem Blütenkleid.
Auf der Heide blüht ein kleines Blümelein
und das heißt: Erika.

On the heath, there blooms a little flower
and it’s called Erika.
Eagerly a hundred thousand little bees,
swarm around Erika.
For her heart is full of sweetness,
a tender scent escapes her blossom-gown.
On the heath, there blooms a little flower
and it’s called Erika.

In der Heimat wohnt ein kleines Mägdelein
und das heißt: Erika.
Dieses Mädel ist mein treues Schätzelein
und mein Glück, Erika.
Wenn das Heidekraut rot-lila blüht,
singe ich zum Gruß ihr dieses Lied.
Auf der Heide blüht ein kleines Blümelein
und das heißt: Erika.

Back at home, there lives a little maiden
and she’s called Erika.
That girl is my faithful little darling
and my joy, Erika!
When the heather blooms in a reddish purple,
I sing her this song in greeting.
On the heath, there blooms a little flower
and it’s called Erika.

In mein’m Kämmerlein blüht auch ein Blümelein
und das heißt: Erika.
Schon beim Morgengrau’n sowie beim Dämmerschein
schaut’s mich an, Erika.
Und dann ist es mir, als spräch’ es laut:
“Denkst du auch an deine kleine Braut?”
In der Heimat weint um dich ein Mägdelein
und das heißt: Erika.

In my room, there also blooms a little flower
and it’s called Erika.
Already In the grey of dawn, as it does at dusk,
It looks at me, Erika!
And then it’s to me as if it’s saying aloud:
“Are you thinking of your fiancée?”
Back at home, a maiden weeps for you
and she’s called Erika.

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