Scrapbookpages Blog

February 1, 2015

President Obama mentions Primo Levi in his statement on Auschwitz

Filed under: Holocaust — Tags: , — furtherglory @ 11:59 am

President Barack Obama mentioned famous Holocaust survivor Primo Levi in his official statement on the 70th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz on Jan. 27, 1945.

Primo Levi was a famous Holocaust survivor

Primo Levi was a famous Holocaust survivor

This quote is from President Obama’s statement which you can read in full here:

We commemorate all of the victims of the Holocaust, pledging never to forget, and recalling the cautionary words of the author and survivor of Auschwitz Primo Levi, “It happened, therefore it can happen again. . . . It can happen anywhere.” Today we come together and commit, to the millions of murdered souls and all survivors, that it must never happen again.

I wonder who wrote this statement for President Obama.  I doubt that he knows who Primo Levi was.

I wrote about Primo Levi in this previous blog post:

https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2011/01/10/primo-levi-the-story-of-ten-days-jan-18th-to-jan-27th-1945/

Scroll way down on the blog post cited above, to read Primo Levi’s famous poem entitled If this is a man.

the unexpected return of anti-Semitism in Europe

Anti-Semitic WWII poster in Germany

Anti-Semitic WWII poster in Germany

This quote is from an article, written by Charles Krauthammer, which you can read in full here:

The rise of European anti-Semitism is in reality just a return to the norm. For a millennium, virulent Jew-hatred — persecution, expulsions, massacres — was the norm in Europe until the shame of the Holocaust created a temporary anomaly wherein anti-Semitism became socially unacceptable.

The hiatus is over. Jew-hatred is back, recapitulating the past with impressive zeal. Italians protesting Gaza handed out leaflets calling for a boycott of Jewish merchants. As in the 1930s. A widely popular French comedian has introduced a variant of the Nazi salute. In Berlin, Gaza brought out a mob chanting, “Jew, Jew, cowardly pig, come out and fight alone!” Berlin, mind you.

European anti-Semitism is not a Jewish problem, however. It’s a European problem, a stain, a disease of which Europe is congenitally unable to rid itself.

Is there any other group of people, anywhere in the world, that has a word which means “hatred of their own group of people”?

Is there anyone in the world who doesn’t know the current meaning of the word “anti-Semite” as opposed to the original meaning of the word?

I wrote about the original meaning of the word on this old blog post:  https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2011/06/19/was-richard-wagner-an-anti-semite/

Nazi propaganda poster

Nazi propaganda poster

The famous Nazi propaganda poster, shown in the photo above, illustrates the reasons that the Germans hated the Jews. The German words, written in blood red, say “The eternal Jew” in  English. Note the hammer and cycle emblem of Communism at the top of the poster.

The article written by Charles Krauthammer ends with this quote:

The Iranian bomb is a national security issue, an alliance issue and a regional Middle East issue. But it is also a uniquely Jewish issue because of Israel’s situation as the only state on earth overtly threatened with extinction, facing a potential nuclear power overtly threatening that extinction.

On the 70th anniversary of Auschwitz, mourning dead Jews is easy. And, forgive me, cheap. Want to truly honor the dead? Show solidarity with the living — Israel and its 6 million Jews. Make “never again” more than an empty phrase. It took Nazi Germany seven years to kill 6 million Jews. It would take a nuclear Iran one day.

Is there any word that means hatred of the German people?  Maybe there is a word for this in Yiddish, but I don’t know of any such word in English.  I think that hatred of the German people is so prevalent that it is considered to be normal thinking and there is no word for it.

World-wide hatred of the German people will go on until the end of time because it is promoted by Holocaust education.  I wrote about this in a previous blog post:  https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/2011/12/28/does-holocaust-education-teach-hatred-of-the-german-people/

Wikipedia has an entry entitled “Anti-German sentiment”, which you can read here.  Maybe Krauthammer should write about hatred of the German people, which is promoted by the Jews with their numerous Museums and monuments to the Jews world-wide.

I wrote about Jewish hatred for the German people, as shown in the Jewish  Museum in Berlin, at https://furtherglory.wordpress.com/tag/jewish-museum-in-berlin/